Posts Tagged ‘ACL tear’

Tips to Avoid Turkey Day Injuries!

Thanksgiving The holidays are a time to celebrate, spend time with family and hopefully enjoy a few relaxing days off from work. For many weekend warriors, “relaxing” means pulling together a game of football or basketball in the back yard. While these games are often enjoyable, many end in injuries such as:

Although some injuries can not be prevented, others can be prevented with some simple warm up measures and consistent muscle training.

  • Build a cardiovascular base. You should maintain your cardio base by doing cardio exercise about 2 times a week year round. You can do running, biking, swimming, rowing, and walking to maintain this base training.
  • Maintain proper nutrition. A balanced diet is important year round but especially during the holidays when temptations are all around us. Adding extra weight, adds strain and stress to the body and this could lead to injury.
  • Core strength. Develop core strength by doing simple core exercises on a weekly basis such as planks or crunches. Poor core strength can lead to a variety of issues, including back pain.
  • Dress correctly. Use the appropriate footwear and protective gear for the sport you are playing. If you are playing football, put on a helmet to protect yourself from a concussion. This could save you from an emergency trip to the hospital before you can even eat your Thanksgiving turkey.

If you do end up with a sports related injury over the holidays, trust Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine to get you back in the game quickly!

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350.

Dr. Mathew PomboAbout Dr. Mathew Pombo, MD

Team Physician: Johns Creek High School, Chattahoochee High School, Berkmar High School

Dr. Pombo is an orthopaedic surgeon new to Emory but has made a big impact on the community in his first 5 years of practicing. Dr. Pombo completed medical school at the University of Georgia, residency at Wake Forest University, and fellowship training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Dr. Pombo sees patients in our Duluth clinic and performs surgery at Emory Johns Creek Hospital. He has a special interest in managing sports related concussions. He also specializes in ACL surgery, shoulder, knee, and hip arthroscopy, joint replacement, and sports medicine treatments for pediatric patients through adult patients.

Dr. Pombo is very engaged with the community and serves as team physician for several schools and youth sporting groups. Dr. Pombo attended Duluth High School and is proud to be back in his community giving back to young athletes.

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ACL Tear & Repair Patient Story – Freddy Assuncao, MMA Fighter

ACL tear repair surgery MMA Fighter Freddy AssunacoAnterior Cruciate Ligament tears in the knee don’t just happen to athletes playing football or soccer. Emory’s Chief of Sports Medicine, Dr. John Xerogeanes, recently repaired an ACL tear for MMA fighter, Freddy Assuncao.

Assuncao tore his ACL in training, helping one of his teammates prepare for an upcoming fight. For the repair of his potentially career-jeopardizing knee injury, Assuncao sought out renowned ACL surgeon, Dr. Xerogeanes – who is affectionately known as “Dr. X” by patients and staffers at Emory Sports Medicine – and a strong team of experts on rehabbing professional athletes from the Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Robert Griffin III: On the Road to ACL Injury Recovery

Dr. John Xerogeanes Emory Sports Medicine

Emory’s Chief of Sports Medicine, Dr. John Xerogeanes (Dr. X), recently spoke with the team from USA Today about the significance of NFL Washington Redskins’ quarterback, Robert Griffin III’s knee injury and the surgery to repair it.

Check out the video below via USA Today to see what Dr. X believes Robert Griffin III’s biggest recovery challenges will be and more on ACL injuries:

About John Xerogeanes, MD

John Xerogeanes MD
Dr. Xerogeanes is Chief of Sports Medicine at the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center. Known as Dr. “X” by his staff and patients, he is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University as well as an Adjunct Professor at Georgia State and Mercer University. Dr. Xerogeanes is entering his 11th year as Head Orthopaedist and Team Physician for Georgia Tech, Emory University, Agnes Scott College and the Atlanta Dream of the WNBA. Dr. X specializes in the care of the knee and shoulder for both male and female athletes of every age. He is board certified in orthopaedic surgery and has his sub-specialty certification in orthopaedic sports medicine.

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Athletic Injuries: Young Athletes Play Through the Pain

Athletic Injury Young AthletesA new study shows that many young athletes keep on playing after they’ve been injured. And all too often, those injuries could have been prevented. Safe Kids Worldwide, a global nonprofit organization with a mission of preventing unintentional childhood injury, found that kids are suffering from overuse injuries, dehydration, and even head injuries.

Kids are under pressure to play at a much higher level and with more intensity than they did decades ago. A pitcher who shows potential may play on two or three different teams during a single season. And Safe Kids found there’s a lot of pressure to stay in the game—even when you’re hurt.

A new Safe Kids study shows a third of young athletes who play team sports suffer injuries severe enough to require medical treatment. But nearly 90% of parents underestimate how much time kids need to recover.

As a result, Emory pediatric orthopedic surgeon Dr. Nicholas Fletcher says, a lot of kids play hurt.

“Kids think if they take a week off, they’ll get kicked off the team, or their parents won’t let them play anymore. It’s very important for the kid to stay on the team, so a lot of times they’ll mask the injury,” says Dr. Fletcher.

Safe Kids found that half of the coaches said they’d felt pressure—either from kids or parents—to put an injured child back in the game. And nearly a third of kids said they would play hurt unless their coach made them stop.

“One of the biggest take-home messages I try to convey to coaches is that this 11-year-old also has a 12-year-old and a 13-year-old and a 14-year-old season,” says Dr. Fletcher, who sees a lot of young players with ACL tears, hip injuries, and throwing injuries. Many of those problems are from overuse. He says if a young athlete is not given time to heal and given proper treatment, he or she can be left with lifelong problems.

Has your son or daughter suffered a sports injury and kept on playing? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.

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Returning to Competition after an ACL Injury and Surgery

ACL Rehab ProgramBecause our sports medicine specialists have created a new program dedicated entirely to ACL injuries and your successful recovery from them, we’ve been sharing blog posts that correspond with the stages of the program. In first post, we helped you identify goals and prepare for ACL surgery after an injury and also introduced you to the concept of prehabilitation, which is equally as important as rehabilitating after surgery. For more on that topic, check out part I of our ACL injury blog series. After helping you prepare for surgery, we then moved on to identifying your post-ACL surgery recovery goals week-by-week in part II of our series. Today, we’ll be covering the last stage of the program and the portion that’s probably most important to those who consider themselves athletes: Returning to Play.

The goals and exercises outlined below will guide you from 3 months until 8 months post surgery. It is vital to faithfully adhere to the following program to avoid re-injury to the ACL reconstruction. Having a physical therapist or certified athletic trainer to help hide you through this program is often helpful. If you’ve had ACL surgery, but are still in the early stages of rehabilitation, check out part I and part II of our ACL injury blog series before moving forward.

Months 3-4: Jogging Phase

During months 3 and 4 of your recovery after ACL surgery you will work on improving functional strength with forwards and backwards movement, increasing your cardiovascular fitness and starting a jogging progression, core strengthening and overall lower extremity flexibility. Tip: when performing exercises such as Schlopy Mini Jumps, use a mirror for feedback. Your hips should stay even and knees should not buckle in, you should flex at your knees not your hips.

Months 4-5: Agility Phase

Building agility in months 4 and 5 of your recovery is a key step in returning to play. During months 4-5, focus on your strength, cardio, flexibility, core, and agility workouts. From the exercises outlined by the program, lower extremity strength should all be done on same day and make sure you get 48 hours rest between strength exercises. Cardiovascular exercises should be done 3-5 times per week.

Months 5-6: Return to Drills Phase

Throughout months 5-6 you will continue to work on improving strength and balance and start getting back to your game. You can add the BOSU ball with your strengthening exercises and start sport specific drills and start to be a part of your team.

Months 6-7: Return to Practice Phase

During months 6-7 of your post-ACL surgery recovery, you can start practicing your sport with your team. You can get physical in practice but only progress to play when you are fully confident. You will need both the physical strength and mental confidence before you start to compete and play.

Months 7-8: Return to Competition Phase

Congratulations! Once you’ve made it this far through the ACL surgery and rehabilitation program, you are ready to return to competition!  Make sure you are in the best shape possible to return both physically and mentally. Your ACL strength and flexibility will only improve as long as you continue to challenge yourself and continue your strengthening.

Remember you won’t be 100 percent, fully recovered until 12 to 18 months. Professional athletes take one year to return to high level competition. Be patient!

If you’ve injured your ACL, whether or not you’ve had surgery yet, check out our ACL rehabilitation program website. All of the phases listed above are outlined on the site with detailed instructions, exercises and tips for making your recovery after ACL surgery as effective as possible.

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Defining Post-Op Goals After ACL Surgery

ACL post operative goals

It is estimated that there are approximately 80,000 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in the U.S. each year. Not surprisingly, 70% of those injuries take place while the person injured is participating in athletic activity. Because ACL tears are so common and can put a hindrance on an athlete pursuing his or her career or passion, our Emory Sports Medicine team has put together an ACL program specifically for people seeking guidance in their treatment and recovery from ACL injuries and tears.

In our last blog post on ACL injuries, we got you familiar with the idea of prehabilitation, or care and steps to take before surgery for an ACL-tear. which is part one of the ACL program at Emory. In this post, we’ll cover some of the details and goals of your post-op recovery from ACL surgery, including what you should expect to see week by week:

ACL Surgery Post-Op Weeks 1-3

Goals: The goals in the first three weeks of your recovery from ACL surgery are fairly straight forward, to get patients back on their feet (off crutches), reduce swelling in the joint by faithfully icing (20 min every 2-4 hrs), and to increase the knee’s range of motion and focusing on getting extension back. For specific measurements you should track and exercises to consider, check out the materials on our website.

ACL Surgery Post-Op Weeks 4-6

Goals: Consistently reducing swelling in the knee and continuing to work on increasing the knee’s range of motion are the core goals of ACL surgery recovery weeks 4-6. At this point in your surgical recovery, your knee should be able to be straight or equal to other knee. Your knee joint should be cooing and not warm to touch. Those 4-6 weeks out from surgery should focus on being able to walk without limping and strengthening quadricep muscles.

ACL Surgery Post-Op Weeks 7-12

Goals: 2-3 months after ACL surgery, swelling should be controlled and there should be minimal effusion in the knee joint. Range of motion should be nearly full or equal to the other side full extension and knee flexion should be to 120 degrees. Knee joint should be cool and normal temperature, compared to other side. By this point, patients should have achieved good quadriceps tone with their vastus medialis oblique (VMO) firing effectively. Patients should also seek to establish normal gait pattern and be able to walk without limping at this point.

Does your recovery timeline after ACL surgery match up with what you see here? If so, or if not, please feel free to share your story with us and with our readers.

Emory Sports Medicine’s ACL injury program specializes in providing care ranging from the prehabilitation stage to getting you back in the game. So, in our next ACL injury post, we’ll share with you specific exercises you can use and steps you can take (including video demonstrations) to help you return to play more quickly. Stay tuned!

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