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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Find Out How to Prevent, Diagnose & Treat Ankle Sprains
Apr 9, 2014 By Oluseun Olufade, M.D.

Ankle Sprain Q&A Chat

Did you know that more than 9 million Americans suffer an ankle sprain each year? Well, if you are one of these individuals or want to learn more about how to prevent an ankle sprain join us on Tuesday, May 27 for a live online chat on “Preventing, Diagnosing & Treating Ankle Sprains” with Emory Othopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD. He will be available to answer questions related to a sprained ankle such as:

  • Can I prevent an ankle sprain?
  • What are the symptoms of an ankle sprain?
  • How do you diagnose an ankle sprain?
  • How do you treat an ankle sprain?
  • Why should I go to Emory for sports medicine care

Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine physician Dr. Olufade is a dedicated non-surgical sports medicine specialist who can offer tips and suggestions to keep you healthy or get you back to health so you can get back to your normal active routine! 

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
What Should You Do When You Sprain Your Ankle?
Apr 2, 2014 By Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

Ankle SprainIt is estimated that 28,000 people injure their ankles every single day in the United States. This is mostly due to engaging in sports and is usually caused due to quick changes in direction, awkward landings from jumps, and stepping on another athlete’s foot. If you have a suspected ankle sprain, you should see a doctor at the first opportunity to ensure proper diagnosis. Don’t try to just ‘walk off’ the injury and ignore it. You can take an NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) to prevent the swelling from getting worse. Common NSAIDS include ibuprofen – such as Advil and Motrin, and naproxen – like Naprosyn. To manage pain immediately, take acetaminophen such as Tylenol. Just make sure to not do so on an empty stomach or exceed the recommended dosage. After managing the pain, follow American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ recommended RICE method to [...]

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Plantar Fasciitis Symptoms and Risk Factors
Mar 26, 2014 By Dr. Rami Calis

ankle-painAre you one of the over 2 million Americans who is suffering from plantar fasciitis this year? If you have stabbing pain in your heel right after getting out of bed or after long periods of standing or sitting you could be suffering from plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain and it is caused by inflammation in the thick band of tissue – plantar fascia – that stretches across the bottom of your feet, connecting your heel to your toes. Plantar fasciitis affects some groups of people more than others. If you fit into any of the categories below, you may be at increased risk for plantar fasciitis: • Middle – aged individuals: Plantar Fasciitis is most commonly experienced by people between 40-60 years of age • Occupations that require standing: People who are on their feet a lot are more likely to develop plantar [...]

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Raising Awareness Around Cerebral Palsy
Mar 20, 2014 By Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

Cerebral Palsy patient, John Sugar

Patient John Sugar is grateful for the care he receives from Dr. Robert Bruce & his team at Emory Orthopaedics to manage his CP so he can live like a normal teen.

March is Cerebral Palsy (CP) awareness month. Cerebral Palsy is a term to describe a group of movement-related disorders that affect 2-3 of every 1,000 children. Last year the United States Senate designated that March 25th is National Cerebral Palsy Awareness Day to honor those with CP. This day is to encourage people to become more informed and bring awareness to the disease. Those that want to show their support in raising Cerebral Palsy awareness are asked to wear something green on March 25th. At the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, we treat many pediatric patients with cerebral palsy. Cerebral Palsy is a life-long condition that affects the communication between the brain and the muscles. CP can cause [...]

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Understanding Exercise Induced Asthma
Mar 10, 2014 By Dr. Amadeus Mason

Sports Induced AsthmaHave you found yourself coughing, wheezing or feeling short of breath during or after exercise recently? If so, it may not just be due to being out of shape. It could be caused by Exercise Induced Asthma; also known as Exercise Induced Bronchospasm. Exercise Induced Asthma could be solely triggered by exercise, or due to a variety of other triggers. This, like other forms of asthma, occurs when airways in your lungs constrict and produce extra amounts of mucus, making it hard to breathe. Symptoms of exercise-induced asthma include:

  • Coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath while exercising
  • Chest pain/tightness
  • Fatigue during exercise
  • Compromised athletic performance

These symptoms can start soon after you begin exercise, and can worsen up to 10-15 minutes after you finish.

Seek immediate medical treatment if your symptoms get worse, since exercise induced asthma

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
90% of Back Problems Can Be Resolved Without Surgery
Mar 4, 2014 By Oluseun Olufade, M.D.

The thought of having to have spine surgery is terrifying to most people. The good news is that only about 10% of patients who have back or neck problems are candidates for surgery. At Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine, we have non operative as well as operative physicians who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of acute back and neck pain injuries. The non-operative physicians, physiatrists, only recommend surgery in the cases where it is absolutely necessary. There are many non-surgical spine treatment options that may fix back problems before opting for surgery. These non-surgical back treatments include anti –inflammatory medication, ice, heat, gentle massage, physical therapy, orthotics, and injections. Patients should only consider surgery if all of the conservative treatment options have been exhausted. In this short video below, Emory’s non-operative sports [...]

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Hip Surgery: Hip Arthroscopy 101
Feb 20, 2014 By Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

Hip arthroscopy is a surgical procedure that is performed through small (about 1 centimeter) incisions using an arthroscope (camera used to visualize the inside of the joint) inside of a hip joint. Hip arthroscopy is typically performed in an outpatient setting, so patients can usually go home the day of surgery after a one to two hour recovery in the outpatient recovery area. Although it will take about 6 months to return to sport activity, close to 85-90% of patients will return to their normal activity after they recover from their hip arthroscopy surgery. Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has a great team of operative and non-operative physicians who are specialized in treating athletes who need hip arthroscopies. Watch this short video to find out more about our unique program. [...]

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Warning Signs of Concussions Not Always Visible
Feb 13, 2014 By Dr. Mathew Pombo

Because the effects are not always visible, many athletes return to their sport too quickly following concussions and head injuries. Unfortunately, this can cause long-term negative health effects. That’s why it’s critical to educate parents, coaches and other athletic officials about the importance of having head injuries examined by a specialized physician who has experience caring for patients with concussion, which can occur with or without the loss of consciousness. Learn more about what we are doing at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine to care for concussions and to educate the community on the importance of waiting to return to play following a head injury in this short video:

Related Resources:

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Dr. Maughon Discusses the Ins & Outs of Joint Replacement Surgery
Feb 7, 2014 By T. Scott Maughon, MD

Joint replacement surgery is a procedure that should only be recommended when all other modes of treatment to eliminate your pain have been exhausted. Almost any joint in the body can be replaced, but most commonly replaced joints are the knee, shoulder and the hip. If you are referred for joint replacement the goal at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine is to get an athlete back to a similar level of play or activity after a surgery. In an aging athlete, joint replacement is typically done for pain relief so the patient is allowed to lead an active life. Although, many patients will be able to do all the activities they did before the joint replacement, we recommend doing activities that do not put a lot of pressure on the joint such as swimming, ice skating and doubles tennis. Watch this short video about joint replacement and details on what makes joint replacement surgery at [...]

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Orthopedics, Spine & Sports Medicine
Exercises to Improve Lower Back Pain
Jan 31, 2014 By Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

Exercises for Lower Back PainAmericans are suffering from lower back pain in record numbers. Many people with low back pain mistakenly think that they need to rest to heal the back pain but actually, most low back pain will get better if you stay active. Exercise has been shown to help decrease lower back pain as well as help you recover faster from the injury. In addition, exercise can help prevent the back from being reinjured and reduces the risk of disability due to back pain. It is important to stay active right after the pain starts so you don’t lose any strength or flexibility. The loss of strength or flexibility could lead to further, more debilitating pain. Exercises for back pain: People who have back pain can do several activities that will strengthen the back including walking, swimming and walking in waist deep water. It is also important to stretch and do strengthening exercises such [...]

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