Running

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s live chat on “How to Run and Train for Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures”

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the live chat with Amadeus Mason, MD, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine. Dr. Mason answered questions about how new runners can develop a plan for training and working up to a long race. He also discussed proper training before a marathon as well as running shoes and how frequently to replace them.

Below are a few questions and answers from the chat. You can see all of the questions and answers by reading the chat transcript.

Question:  Are there any special precautions of which “new” runners with low back pain should be mindful?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason:
Running should not be causing low back pain. If your low back pain was already present before you started running, or you are experiencing low back pain after running, I recommend you be evaluated to find out why.
 
 
 
Question:  I would love to become a runner. As of now I am training using the Get Running app. I want to know if this is a good way to ease into running so, that I may one day be able to run a 5K?

Amadeus  Mason, MDDr. Mason:
There is no one, single way to work up to running a 5K. While I am not familiar with that specific app, I would recommend some general principles to help prevent injury:

  1. Have a plan.
  2. Stick to your plan.
  3. Progress slowly and never increase pace and distance at the same time.
  4. Cross train, taking regular rest days. Consider running every other day.
  5. A 5K is only 3.1miles. There’s no need to be running longer than five miles at any individual session.

If you missed this chat with Dr. Mason, be sure to check out the full chat transcript!

Visit our website for more information about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Are you a Weekend Warrior and Want to Learn How to Train for Summer Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures?

If so, join Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD for an online web chat on Tuesday, June 10 at noon. Dr. Mason will be available to answer your questions regarding running and other sports injuries such as

  • Prevention of injury
  • Stretching
  • Symptoms of certain athletic injuries
  • Risk factors for athletic/running injuries
  • Treatment for specific sports injuries
  • When to visit your sports medicine physician

If you are interested in learning more about preventing and treating sports and running injuries register for the live chat by visiting emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats!

About Dr. Mason

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children

Related Links

Emory Sports Medicine
Runner’s chat with Dr. Mason 2013 transcript
More Runners’ Chat Questions Answered
Tennis Elbow and PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Therapy – Is it Right for Me?

What is Better for My Health? Weights or Cardiovascular Exercise?

Cardio vs. WeightsFor the promotion of overall health and reduction of risk around developing diseases like cancer, diabetes and heart disease, the most effective fitness plan incorporates both cardiovascular training and strength training. There are different benefits to the different types of exercise, so it is ideal to plan your weekly workout routine split (2-3 days of each) between strength and cardio training.

Benefits of cardiovascular training

  • Breathing harder and deeper increases amount of oxygen in the blood
  • Heart, lungs, blood vessels work more efficiently with cardio exercises to transport oxygen through the body
  • Burns calories – one hour of running burns approximately 600 calories in a average female and 750 calories in the average male

Benefits of strength training

  • Increase muscle mass – you will be able to do activities longer after building muscle mass
  • Maintain joint flexibility
  • Increase bone density
  • Manage your weight – Note that muscle burns more calories than fat so if you have more muscle your metabolism is likely to be higher and you are likely to be slimmer.

Lack of sufficient exercise contributes to the possibility of developing conditions such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and several types of cancer. All forms of exercise can reduce your risk of developing diseases that can be harmful to your overall health.

If you can exercise 5 – 6 days a week for over 30 minutes a day, you are ahead of the game. And if you can’t make 30 minutes a day, start small by taking the stairs at work, doing some calisthenics when you wake up in the morning, or by going for a short bike ride with your children. Work it in when you can – your body and health will thank you for it!

Related Resources:

How to Prevent Plantar Fasciitis
Understanding & Preventing Tennis Elbow
Tennis Elbow Isn’t the Only Thing that Causes Tennis Elbow
Understanding IT Band Syndrome
Understanding Runners Knee

About Dr. Mason

Dr. Amadeus MasonDr. Amadeus Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

About Emory Sports Medicine

The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta, Duluth, Johns Creek and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory sports medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.

Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours. Call 404-778-7777 today.

Understanding Exercise Induced Asthma

Sports Induced AsthmaHave you found yourself coughing, wheezing or feeling short of breath during or after exercise recently? If so, it may not just be due to being out of shape. It could be caused by Exercise Induced Asthma; also known as Exercise Induced Bronchospasm. Exercise Induced Asthma could be solely triggered by exercise, or due to a variety of other triggers. This, like other forms of asthma, occurs when airways in your lungs constrict and produce extra amounts of mucus, making it hard to breathe.

Symptoms of exercise-induced asthma include:

  • Coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath while exercising
  • Chest pain/tightness
  • Fatigue during exercise
  • Compromised athletic performance

These symptoms can start soon after you begin exercise, and can worsen up to 10-15 minutes after you finish.

Seek immediate medical treatment if your symptoms get worse, since exercise induced asthma can be life threatening in emergency situations:

  • Shortness of breath quickly worsens
  • No improvement even after using a rescue inhaler
  • Shortness of breath continues even after recovery from your workout

There are no clear causes of exercise induced asthma, but factors that can provoke an attack are:

  • Cold air
  • Dry air
  • Air pollution
  • High pollen counts
  • Respiratory infections such as colds
  • Chemicals

No particular exercise is totally forbidden, but those that make you breathe harder can be triggers. These include basketball, running, hockey and soccer versus weightlifting, golfing or moderate walking.

Exercise Asthma risk factors include:

  • Already having asthma
  • Hay fever or other allergies
  • Having a parent or sibling with asthma
  • Smoking or second hand smoke exposure
  • Exposure to chemical triggers such as chlorine in pools
  • Being a child (they tend to be more active than adults)

After being tested and diagnosed by your doctor, they may prescribe two kinds of medicine: Quick Relief and/or Long-Term Control medication.

  • Quick Relief medication is for rapid, short-term symptom relief during an attack. Sometimes a doctor may recommend using it before exercise.
  • Long-Term Control medication is for frequent asthma symptoms that occur even when you are not exercising or when using medicine before workouts does not help. They are taken daily.

If using both, it is suggested not to use the Quick Relief inhaler more than recommended. Get in the habit of recording the number of puffs you take per week. If you find that you need to use it more frequently, talk to your doctor to adjust your Long-Term Control medication.

The good news is that with treatment, you can do intense aerobic activity, along with avoiding causes of attacks by breathing through your nose, wearing a scarf over your nose and mouth, avoiding exercise when the air is polluted or dirty, avoiding exercising near recently mowed lawns, and warming up before exercise and cooling down after.

About Dr. Mason
Dr. Amadeus MasonDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

Related Resources:

Understanding IT Band Syndrome

IT Band Syndrome IT Band Injury

Iliotibial band (IT) syndrome, also referred to as IT band injury or IT band pain, is an injury that affects the outside of the  knee and is caused when irritation or inflammation of the IT band occurs.

If you have ever suffered from IT band syndrome, you know IT band pain is a pain you don’t want to feel again.  The good news is that you can prevent IT band injuries with strengthening and stretching exercises. Pay close attention and follow the information/suggestions here and you may be able to steer clear from the pain of IT band syndrome!

What is the IT Band?

The IT band is the long, strong, thick band of tissue that runs along the outside of the leg.  It starts at the hip area and runs all the way down to just below the knee.  The purpose of the band is to provide stability to the knee during movement.

IT Band Syndrome Causes

An IT band injury is an overuse injury,  primarily caused by inflammation of the IT band.   Tightness in the IT band can cause friction  where the IT band crosses the knee joint.   Causes of IT band syndrome can include:

  • Running up and down hill repeatedly
  • Running on a banked or sloped surface (like an indoor track or edge of a road)
  • Running up and down stairs
  • Weak hip muscles
  • Uneven leg length
  • Excessive foot strike force

IT Band Injury Symptoms

  • Stinging sensation above the knee
  • Swelling or thickening of the tissue where IT band moves over femur
  • Pain may intensify over time and may not occur immediately during activity
  • Pain occurs when foot strikes the ground
  • Pain may occur where the IT band attaches to the tibia

Preventing IT Band Syndrome

  • Warm up and stretch before competing or practicing
  • Recover properly between events/competitions/practices
  • Improve core strength with Pilates type exercises
  • Avoid running on banked surfaces
  • Avoid running the same direction on the track all the time
  • If you have flat fee, where arch supports or orthotics

Check out the exercises in this downloadable document: IT Band Stretching & Strengthening Exercises (PDF). And in this blog post, you’ll find more information on preventing running injuries.

IT Band Syndrome Treatment

  • Rest – most runners don’t want to listen to this advice but rest really will help alleviate the pain
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Ice the painful area
  • Improve flexibility by stretching
  • Physical therapy

We hope you can steer clear of IT band syndrome and keep your legs moving!


Peachtree Road RaceEmory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the AJC Peachtree Road Race.

Emory Healthcare is the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia and includes Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Wesley Woods Center, Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Adventist Hospital, The Emory Clinic, Emory Specialty Associates, and the Emory Clinically Integrated Network.

Come visit us at the AJC Peachtree Road Race expo in booth 527 to get your blood pressure checked and learn more about how Emory Healthcare can help you and your family stay healthy!


About Dr. Brandon Mines

Brandon Mines, MD

Brandon Mines, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics. Dr. Mines started practicing at Emory in 2005 after completing his Sports Medicine Fellowship at University of California – Los Angeles. Dr. Mines is board certified in both family practice and sports medicine. He has focused his clinical interest on sports injuries and conditions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, knee, foot and ankle. He is head team physician for the Women’s National Basketball Association’s (WNBA) Atlanta Dream and Decatur High School. He is also one of the team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons.  His areas of interest are diagnosis and non-operative management of acute sports injuries, basketball injuries, tennis injuries, golf injuries and joint injections.

Understanding Runners’ Knee aka Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Knee PainDo you have pain in the front of your knee behind the kneecap? If so, you may have patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS for short), commonly known as “runners’ knee”. Typically runners’ knee is not a product of an injury, but is caused by abnormal leg mechanics including weakness in the quadriceps which result in poor tracking of the kneecap.

You can increase your risk of developing runners’ knee if you have tight hamstrings, or do not warm up enough before an event. Runners often experience patellofemoral pain as they increase their running distance and/or frequency.

Symptoms of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome:

  • Pain in the knee, usually in the front of the knee, behind the kneecap
  • Pain in the back of the knee or also above or below the kneecap
  • Pain that gets worse after sitting for long periods of time
  • Pain that gets worse after going up or especially down stairs or hills
  • Pain that gets worse when wearing shoes with high heels
  • Pain with jumping, squatting, and lunging
  • “Crunching” or “popping” in the knee
  • Minimal swelling

The good news is that this condition is treatable with improving your overall leg mechanics. You should think about incorporating strength training into your running training so that you strengthen the quadriceps and gluteus muscles. It is also important to stretch the hamstrings and IT band. If you have flat feet or foot pronation (fallen arches) you should consider inserting orthotics in your shoes to support your arches.

If you are diagnosed with this condition, you may have to stop running temporarily until the knee pain subsides, but continuing to run will not cause long term damage. You should at least consider adding in cross training with activities such as swimming and cycling which will be easier on the knee with PFPS and maintain your fitness. Make sure to ice your knee after exercise and take anti-inflamatories like ibuprofen. You may also want to try a neoprene sleeve for comfort.  Refer to this Patellofemoral Syndrome document for some exercises you can safely do to strengthen the muscles, increase flexibility and stretch the quadriceps.

If your knee pain has not improved within 4-6 weeks, you should consult your sports medicine physician.


Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the AJC Peachtree Road Race.

Peachtree Road RaceEmory Healthcare is the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia and includes Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Orthopedics & Spine Hospital, Wesley Woods Center, Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Adventist Hospital, The Emory Clinic, Emory Specialty Associates, and the Emory Clinically Integrated Network.

Come visit us at the AJC Peachtree Road Race expo in booth 527 to get your blood pressure checked and learn more about how Emory Healthcare can help you and your family stay healthy!

About Dr. Jeff Webb

Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools, the Atlanta Dekalb International Olympic Training Center, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Perimeter College, and many other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books. Dr Webb is an avid runner and has completed 16 Peachtree Road Races.

Related Resources

 

Preparing for the AJC Peachtree Road Race: Answers to your Running Questions

Dr. Amadeus MasonLast week I had the opportunity to chat online with over one hundred members of the Atlanta running community to answer their questions about running and how to prevent running injuries to help not only those participating in the AJC Peachtree Road Race, but all runners in our city and state. We had so many questions from the chat that I didn’t get a chance to get to all of them, so I wanted to circle back with the participants that didn’t get answers to their questions. You’ll find my answers below in a Q&A format. If you didn’t get to attend the live chat, or just want a recap, check out the chat transcript (which you can also print), and don’t forget to check out the additional resources and questions and answers below.

For those that are running in the AJC Peachtree Road Race, I wish you a healthy and successful race!

ACL Injuries and Young Female Athletes

Thank you for joining me for the live chat on ACL injuries last week!  We had some excellent questions. One participant asked a key question about young females and ACL injuries and I would like to expand on my response to this important subject.

There are a growing number of  female athletes who are tearing their ACLs.  In fact, young female athletes (under 20 years old) are four to eight times more likely than males to injure their ACL.  Even though extensive research has been done on the reasons why this could happen, we are not exactly sure why females tend to injure their ACL easier. Luckily, if a young woman injures her ACL  we are able to get most athletes back to their previous level of play due to advances in arthroscopic surgery and specialized physical therapy.

Full recovery may take about eight to 10 months but important to note, is in rehabilitation, experienced physical therapists are working with the athlete to help them avoid re-injury.  The physical therapists and athletic trainers are teaching young girls how to jump, how to land, how to contract muscles correctly as well as specific exercises that will help strengthen the knee.  Some of the things we are teaching young female athletes are not instinctual but will greatly help reduce the risk of future injury if implemented correctly when the athlete starts participating in their sport again.

If you have had a ACL injury please make sure to work with your physical therapist to make sure you are working some of these aspects into your recovery.  If you have not had an ACL tear but you are a young female athlete, do some research on how to avoid injuries so you can excel in your sport without injury. One recommended source is the PEP Program which seeks to prevent ACL injuries.

For the full transcript on the chat visit - http://advancingyourhealth.org/orthopedics/past-doctor-chats/acl-injuries-chat/

About Dr. Sam Labib

Dr. Labib is an Emory Sports Medicine orthopaedic surgeon with special interest in problems and procedures of the knee, ankle, and foot. He is the head team physician for the athletic programs at Oglethorpe University, Spelman College, and Georgia Perimeter College. He is also an orthopaedic consultant to the Atlanta Faclcons, Georgia Tech and Emory University.

He has lectured both nationally and internationally at many orthopedic meetings. His research has been published in several journals, including JBJS, Arthroscopy, Foot and Ankle International and the American Journal of Orthopedics as well as numerous video presentations and book chapters. Dr Labib is Board Certified in orthopedic surgery with additional subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine Surgery.

Related Links

 

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How to Prevent Plantar Fasciitis – a Common Running Injury

Plantar Fasciitis

It is almost spring time and many runners will be ramping up their running mileage in preparation for spring and summer running races! Take a couple of minutes to read this blog post to learn about ways to prevent a painful and irritating condition called plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is a common running related injury and is often caused by excessive running, wearing the wrong type of shoe while running, wearing shoes that are too old and worn out while running, or building up running mileage too quickly. Plantar fasciitis involves pain and inflammation of a thick band of tissue, called the plantar fascia, that runs across the bottom of your foot and connects your heel bone to your toes.

Takeaways from Running Injury Live Chat

Dr. Amadeus MasonOn Tuesday, Dr. Amadeus Mason of Emory Sports Medicine, held a live chat that answered your questions about preventing running injuries. Dr. Mason provided some great answers to some very interesting questions; from how to prevent running injuries to the ideal length of time one should consider when training for a 5k and other long distance races.  Dr. Mason also provided participants with resources on things like: knee pain and strengthening and IT Band Syndrome.

The following is a recap of the live chat, or you can check out the transcript from Dr. Mason’s Preventing Running Injuries chat.

Q. Is it better to stretch before a run? After a run? Or Both?

A. For runners stretching for flexibility, it’s better to stretch after their run, because muscles are looser and more receptive to the stretch at that time. Dr. Mason also noted that while stretching before a run doesn’t hurt, runners should keep in mind that it’s best to spend at least ¼ of the time you spend running on stretching. As an example, Dr. Mason suggests if a runner trains for an hour, it’s best to stretch for at least 15 minutes.

Q. How does a runner prevent shin splints from reoccurring and preventing the pain’s longevity?

A. Runners experiencing recurrent shin splints, or moderate to severe pain in the shin that lasts for a long period of time, should see a specialist. Make sure not to train too much, too quickly, that’s one of the most common causes of shin splints, according to Dr. Mason. If shin splints occur, it’s recommended that a runner modifies their training regimen to accommodate for pain relief. Females, who experience shin splints on a fairly regular or recurrent basis, should contact their Physician.  Continuous shin pain is a possible indication that there’s some sort of hormonal imbalance or insufficient caloric intake from a female runner’s diet.

For more information on preventing running injuries, check out Dr. Mason’s chat transcript. You can also download the resources he shared in the chat by using the links below.

Related Resources