Patient Story

Emory Bone Cancer Patient Story: “I have full motion in my arm again!”

ms k11-27 2msk 11-27It happened so quickly. One day I was working out and noticed a bulge in my left shoulder but I didn’t think much of it, in fact, I thought maybe my muscles were growing! But my concern grew as the lump got larger. I made a random visit to the chiropractor and during the visit he moved my right arm across my body. When he went to move my left arm across my body, it was impossible; motion of my left arm was completely restricted. The chiropractor knew something was not right and referred me to a primary care physician for an X-ray. I was scared and didn’t want to face reality that this inability to move my arm could be something serious. I wasn’t in pain – the ball on my shoulder wasn’t bothering me or affecting my life – but it was critical that I figure out what it was.

On September 5, 2013, the news was broken to me that I had a tumor in my left shoulder. It was on that day that I was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma, the most common type of bone cancer. This cancer begins in the bone compared to other cancers that begin somewhere else in the body and spread to bone. Immediately my parents started making calls, knocking on neighbors’ doors and doing research in hopes of finding the best doctor and treatment in the area for my diagnosis. My parents were told that an oncology surgeon, Dr. David Monson at Emory Orthopedics & Spine Center in Atlanta, GA, was the best in the business. That’s when I knew I was going to be in good hands. Dr. Monson’s exceptional reputation was my definition of a rock star surgeon!

The first step in this treatment journey was to make an appointment for an MRI, CT scan and biopsy. Before the tests, my medical oncology team prepped me that chemotherapy and radiation would mostly likely be needed for the next 6 months of my life. Thankfully, the MRI and CT scan showed the cancer had not spread to anywhere else in my body. Then the biopsy results came in and revealed that the bulge was a low grade tumor, which meant no chemotherapy or radiation was needed, rather surgery and physical therapy.

I was informed that the surgery would be to remove six inches of bone from my arm and replace it with a cadaver. I was relieved and extremely grateful that this treatment option wouldn’t turn my whole life upside down, but there were still concerns. I didn’t know if I would ever get back full motion in my arm or be able to get my arm over my head again. I didn’t know if I would look the same after surgery with this “new” arm.

Less than twenty days from the date of my diagnosis, on September 23, 2013, I had surgery. I remained hospitalized for three days following the surgery and then began my healing journey. I couldn’t return to work for four weeks and went through six months of physical therapy. The team at Emory made my journey to recovery seamless. I especially loved my physical therapist. Her excitement every session made me excited! She looked at my circumstances as a challenge, but together we pushed through. In fact, because my recovery went so well – something she had never seen with my type of surgery before – she ended up using it as a case study.

Today, my life is mostly back to normal. I have full motion in my left arm again, but my arm is still restricted when it comes to putting weight on it. It is going to take some time for the new bone to fully fuse with my natural bone, so right now I cannot hold more than five pounds with my left hand. I am aware and mindful of the activity and stress I place on my new arm, but I do not want to do anything that could potentially damage it, but thankfully I am able to work out regularly and both my work and social life are as normal as they can be!

A Note From Dr. Monson
Ms. Peterson was fortunate in that her osteosarcoma was low grade and required surgery alone for resection and reconstruction. There was no need for chemotherapy as there is in high grade osteosarcomas. There are only about 50 of these tumor types diagnosed a year in the entire United States. Our goal was to provide Ms. Peterson with as functional a reconstruction as possible and thus we chose to do so with a cadaver bone transplant of the proximal humerus where we could perform a direct rotator cuff repair. Repair of the shaft of the cadaver to the patient’s own remaining humerus bone distally was performed with plates and screws, much like that performed in fracture repair surgery. Reconstruction with an artificial prosthesis is actually an easier procedure technically; however the inability to reestablish reliable rotator cuff function often leads to lesser function of the shoulder. Although no reconstruction option can be declared a permanent solution, the use of the cadaver transplant burns no bridges and keeps options open for Ms. Peterson should she require more surgery in the future. She has excelled with her physical therapy and her full restoration of motion reflects strongly on her will and determination.

About Dr. Monson

monson-david-kDavid Monson, MD, and his partners at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center have the ONLY multidisciplinary musculoskeletal oncology service in Georgia that serves both children and adults. His focus is on rare tumors, sarcomas of the bone (2,500 cases a year in the U.S.) and soft tissue (10,000 cases a year in the U.S.) as well as other uncommon benign bone and soft tissue tumors. He also treats metastatic disease to the bone from other primary malignancies and often performs complex reconstructive procedures for these disorders not available in the community. The efforts of his practice also extend to complex skeletal reconstructions that may arise from failed orthopaedic procedures performed elsewhere.

He is only one of two fellowship-trained orthopaedic oncologists in the state of Georgia (the other is his partner, Dr. Shervin Oskouei) that concentrates his practice within his subspecialty. He also performs total hip and total knee replacements, specifically more difficult primary replacements or revisions that may require the skills developed within his practice of musculoskeletal oncology.

“I woke up pain free”: Words from an Emory Sports Medicine Center Patient

mskpatientThe two years of my life before visiting Dr. Kenneth Mautner at the Emory Sports Medicine Center were painful. I had moderate to severe pain in my right interior knee joint. My symptoms were stiffness, swelling and sharp pains while I was sleeping, walking and even driving!

Finally I decided to make an appointment with one of the largest and most visible orthopedic clinics in Atlanta. During my visit there, they took an X-ray of my knee and diagnosed me with early stage Osteoarthritis. The physician suggested I first use over the counter medication twice daily to treat the pain and occasionally receive cortisone shots to help with ongoing pain management. If that didn’t work, he said I would eventually need a knee replacement.

After getting this news, I was a little uneasy. I thought to myself, “There has to be another option besides daily medication that could hurt my liver, or surgery.” After much prayer and research, I was led to the Emory Sports Medicine Center. I watched several of the patient videos and marveled at the success stories, from different conditions like hip and knee to procedures like Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy and stem cell therapy.

Without hesitation I called and made an appointment to see Dr. Mautner! Once at Emory, Dr. Mautner ordered an MRI, which revealed a bad meniscus tear and early osteoarthritis. In May 2015, we started Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy, which took platelets from my blood and reinjected them back into my injured knee. The procedure took about 15 minutes and while it hurt, it was less painful than I expected.

The first nine days after the injection I experienced increased pain, but on the tenth day I woke up pain free and have not had any pain since! It’s amazing! The tissues around the joint have calmed and are not swollen. I have returned to my customary two-mile walk each day, and can go up and down hills and stairs. I can sleep and drive pain free.

I feel great and the treatment was worth every penny, which was minimal considering the wonderful benefits! Thank you Dr. Mautner and the team at Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Steve Alvarez
Patient, Emory Sports Medicine Center
Dunwoody, Georgia

Are you considering PRP therapy? If so, make sure it’s performed properly and with the right expert guidance. Learn more about why you should choose Emory Sports Medicine for PRP therapy.

About Dr. Mautner

mautner-kennethKenneth Mautner, MD, is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) with a subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine. He has a special interest in the areas of sports concussions, where he is regarded as a local and regional expert in the field. In 2005, he became one of the first doctors in Georgia to use office based neuropsychological testing to help determine return to play for athletes. He also is an expert in diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound and teaches both regional and national courses on how to perform office based ultrasound. He regularly performs Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections for patients with chronic tendinopathy.

Dr. Mautner also specializes in the care of athletes with spine problems as well as hip and groin injuries.

Dr. Mautner currently serves as head team physician for Agnes Scott College and St. Pius High School and a team physician for Emory University Athletics. He is also a consulting physician for Georgia Tech Athletics, Neuro Tour, the Atlanta Ballet, and several local high schools.

Emory Spine Patient Story: “I wanted to walk down my long driveway – I can now.”

By Sara Dollar, Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center patient

Scoliosis PatientAt the age of 12, I started seeing a chiropractor. In my early teenage years, I was diagnosed with severe scoliosis. Doctors told me that by the time I reached the age of 45, I might not be able to breathe if the scoliosis got bad enough. My spine was shaped like a perfect “S.” I had my first surgery in 1977, followed by several more surgeries. Surgery after surgery left me in excruciating pain. I lived my life, but because my spine was stuck in a bad position, I walked crooked, I couldn’t stand up straight, I couldn’t walk my dogs, and I couldn’t walk five feet without my back spasming. I had become like a hermit crab.

In September 2014, I was referred to John M. Rhee, MD, a spinal surgeon at the Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center, because I had a very delicate problem that my former surgeons could not handle. Dr. Rhee explained to me what could be done, and I was so excited that I wanted to have surgery on the same day as my office visit! But because my problem was very severe, and the required surgery would be complex, Dr. Rhee asked me to go home and discuss this with my family. I was so grateful for this! After much thought, I decided to have surgery – a lumbar osteotomy, which is a major operation done only at highly- specialized spine centers, like Emory, because of its complexity.

I had done so much research on Emory and Dr. Rhee that even before my first scheduled appointment I knew that I had made the right decision. I felt comfortable. Before I went into surgery, I made some goals that I wanted to attain after my procedures: mainly, I just wanted to live without pain. I am happy to say that Dr. Rhee helped me achieve this!

I had two planned surgeries to correct my severe scoliosis and kyphosis. They were done on January 22 and 23, 2015. Compression on the nerves had to be relieved along with fusion and correction of the deformed areas of the spine. My previous hardware had to be removed and repositioned properly, and a wedge of bone was removed from one of my vertebrae in order to realign my spine so I could stand up straight again. This was a major procedure because I had had multiple prior surgeries that left my spine severely deformed.

At my six week checkup, I was walking without any assistance from a cane, walker or person. I think I surprised Dr. Rhee with how well I was doing and how quickly I had recovered.

While I am still healing, I am not in any pain and am accomplishing all of my goals. I wanted to walk down my long driveway – I can now. I wanted to be able to walk down the beach – I can now. I wanted the freedom of walking into a store to grab some milk and bread without needing or using a shopping cart – I can now. When the time comes, I want to run after my future grandchildren, and because of my surgery, I believe I will be able to.

My advice to others considering spine surgery; do not be afraid, stop living in pain, quit suffering and get your good quality of life back. Surgery is not the answer for everyone, but if it is, I would not trust anyone other than the renowned spine surgeons at Emory Orthopaedic & Spine Center. Thanks to them, I am living well and attaining my goals.

About Dr. Rhee

John Rhee, MDJohn M. Rhee, MD, is a Spinal Surgeon and Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery specializing in cervical spine surgery, lumbar spine surgery, complex spinal deformity surgery (scoliosis and kyphosis) and surgery for spinal tumors. Dr. Rhee is an active researcher and sought-after teacher/lecturer at the national and international level in multiple medical societies. He has served as faculty and been an invited lecturer at numerous meetings and courses on spine surgery. In addition, he has served as Program Chairman at numerous national and international spine surgery meetings. Dr. Rhee has also published extensively in a number of peer reviewed journals and books, and he has received numerous awards and honors. He is actively involved the training of international research scholars and other spinal surgeons and has been the author and editor of major textbooks on spine surgery techniques.

Raising Awareness Around Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy patient, John Sugar

Patient John Sugar is grateful for the care he receives from Dr. Robert Bruce & his team at Emory Orthopaedics to manage his CP so he can live like a normal teen.

March is Cerebral Palsy (CP) awareness month. Cerebral Palsy is a term to describe a group of movement-related disorders that affect 2-3 of every 1,000 children.

Last year the United States Senate designated that March 25th is National Cerebral Palsy Awareness Day to honor those with CP. This day is to encourage people to become more informed and bring awareness to the disease. Those that want to show their support in raising Cerebral Palsy awareness are asked to wear something green on March 25th.

At the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, we treat many pediatric patients with cerebral palsy. Cerebral Palsy is a life-long condition that affects the communication between the brain and the muscles.

CP can cause a variety of motor disabilities and issues ranging from very mild, with the child appearing to be slightly clumsy, to more severe movement issues, where the child may be unable to walk.

Emory Sports Medicine patient, Susie Hemphill: A Story of Recovery

Susie HemphillIn August 2008 I fell and hurt my ankle. Over the course of four years, I was treated by two different orthopaedic surgeons and was not able to participate in tennis or any other sports. This was devastating for me because I am an avid and accomplished tennis player. I was recruited out of high school in Illinois to play collegiate tennis at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. But as a result of my ankle injury, I struggled to walk. I almost gave up hope that I would ever play again after two failed ankle surgeries. It was so hard to even perform daily tasks that I was contemplating applying for disability benefits. I was miserable with life because I was in so much pain on a daily basis.

According to Emory Orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Sam Labib, I had a condition in my ankle where there was no cartilage between my foot and ankle bone. Dr. Labib gave me hope and said he could repair the damage by taking cartilage from my knee and putting it in my ankle. On, August 23, 2012, I had cartilage repair surgery at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta with Dr. Labib. It’s been a little over a year and a half since the surgery and I just keep getting better and better. Now, I am happy to say that I am pretty much as good as new and back to playing tennis as much as I want. I even recently made it to the City Finals playing Atlanta Lawn and Tennis Association AA1 Women’s Tennis. It is hard for me to believe that I was unable to do anything for almost four years.

Thanks to Dr. Labib, I am also now back to doing what I love professionally. I am a United States Professional Tennis Coach. It is so great to be back playing and coaching. I owe it all to Dr. Sam Labib. Dr. Labib is a caring, compassionate, exceptional, talented, driven doctor and I owe him the world for fixing me and giving my life back. I highly recommend Dr. Labib to any patient who has a similar condition.

About Dr. Sameh (Sam) Labib

Dr. Sameh Labib

Sam Labib, MD, is a sports medicine fellowship-trained surgeon and director of the foot and ankle service at Emory. Dr. Labib started practicing at Emory in 1999. He is an Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery.

He has lectured both nationally and internationally at many orthopedic meetings. His research has been published in several journals, including the JBJS, Arthroscopy, Foot and Ankle International and the American Journal of Orthopedics as well as numerous video presentations and book chapters. Dr. Labib is Board Certified in orthopedic surgery with additional subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine Surgery.

For the past 5 years, Dr. Labib has been nominated by his peers as one of “America’s Top Doctors” as tracked by Dr. Labib has a particular interest in problems and procedures of the knee, ankle, and foot. He is the head team physician for the athletic programs at Oglethorpe University and Spelman College, and an orthopaedic consultant to the Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech and Emory University.

About Emory Sports Medicine
The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory sports medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.
Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours. Call 404-778-7777 for an appointment.

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Atlanta Opera Violinist Back on Her Feet Thanks to Emory Orthopedists!

Fia Mancini Durrett, Atlanta Opera Orchestra Violinist and Emory patient, recently played her violin for Emory Sports Medicine physician Sam Labib, MD and his clinic staff. Fia made a deal with Dr. Labib that if he could help rid her of foot and back pain, she would play her violin for him in clinic.

Dr. Labib held up his end of the deal, so on her last visit to the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, Fia brought her violin along.

ACL Tear & Repair Patient Story – Freddy Assuncao, MMA Fighter

ACL tear repair surgery MMA Fighter Freddy AssunacoAnterior Cruciate Ligament tears in the knee don’t just happen to athletes playing football or soccer. Emory’s Chief of Sports Medicine, Dr. John Xerogeanes, recently repaired an ACL tear for MMA fighter, Freddy Assuncao.

Assuncao tore his ACL in training, helping one of his teammates prepare for an upcoming fight. For the repair of his potentially career-jeopardizing knee injury, Assuncao sought out renowned ACL surgeon, Dr. Xerogeanes – who is affectionately known as “Dr. X” by patients and staffers at Emory Sports Medicine – and a strong team of experts on rehabbing professional athletes from the Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Collapsed Disc Spine Patient Races to Recovery

For years, triathlete Denise Novicki suffered from excruciating spinal pain in her lower back. Founder of Tri2Remember, a triathlon club that raises money to fight Alzheimer’s disease, Denise had always led an active lifestyle, but her back pain made it difficult, if not impossible, to enjoy her favorite pastime.

“I was in such immense pain that I was looking for some very trusted resources to manage my pain,” Denise says. She chose the Emory Spine Center at the Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital for assessment and a solution.

“What we’ve tried to do here at the Emory Spine Center is take the worry and the guessing out of a spine or back problem,” says Dr. Scott Boden (pictured left), director of the Center. “When people come here, we help them figure out what’s wrong and give them lots of different options.”

Before the spine doctors at the Emory Spine Center suggest surgery, they investigate all possible nonsurgical interventions, but they also know that, in some cases, a simple surgery may make the difference between experiencing debilitating pain and living pain free.

To find out the cause of her back pain, Denise met with spine surgeon Dr. John Heller, who discovered that she had a collapsed disc. It was clear to Dr. Heller that surgery would bring Denise relief and allow her to get her life back. “Denise came to us seeking advice on how to improve back pain that had really gotten in the way of her normal lifestyle,” says Dr. Heller. “She was an avid athlete and was having tremendous difficulty maintaining a training regiment, let alone a normal, everyday life.”

Before her spine surgery, Denise signed up for an upcoming Ironman distance race. She wanted to be sure she had a goal in place that would help her stay focused on recovery. She achieved her goal. “Coming into doing the Ironman, I had a different perspective than probably most athletes do, because I came to the table with thankfulness that I am actually able to compete. I did what I set out to do, and I couldn’t have done it without the team at Emory.” To learn more about Denise’s experience with spine surgery at Emory, check out the short video below:

Dr. Boden says, “The thing I love about taking care of patients with spine problems is that we have a real opportunity to help patients get their lives back, and that’s a very special thing.”

Dr. Scott BodenThe spine doctors at the Emory Spine Center are dedicated to excellent spine care. “Some places, people are part-time spine and part-time hips and knees, but what’s unique about our group is that everybody primarily focuses on taking care of patients with spine problems, teaching trainees who are learning about the spine, and doing research to try and explore new and better ways to treat spinal problems,” says Dr. Boden (pictured left). “If you end up coming to Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, you’ll leave saying that you’ve never been in a hospital that’s anything like it.”

Have you had spinal surgery at the Emory Spine Center? We’d like to hear about your experience. Please take a moment to give us feedback in the comments section below.

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Female High School Soccer Players 64% More Likely to Suffer from Concussions Than Males

Female athletes concussion riskShe’s only 16, but she’s already been playing soccer for over a decade. In that time, Alex Anne Matthews, a junior at the Lovett School in the Buckhead area of Atlanta, has broken several bones and sustained two concussions. Unfortunately, according to a new study, the injuries Alex has sustained over her currently 12-year-long soccer career are not only common, but more common for female high school soccer players than males.

During a soccer game on September 4th of this year, Alex hit the ground with force. “She came up from behind me and slide-tackled my feet out from under me, and I landed on my side, and the first thing to hit the ground was my head,” she recalls. Alex’s parents looked on as it happened, and as her mother, Anne Matthews puts it, “Alex Anne got up like she always does and staggered a little to her right. And Chip and I looked at each other and went, ‘that doesn’t look good.”

Despite a noticeable headache, Alex charged on and played in a second soccer game that same afternoon, but it wasn’t too long before routine concussion symptoms: nausea, dizziness, and blurred vision set in. According to Dr. Kenneth Mautner of Emory Sports Medicine, “There’s actually sheering forces that occur inside the brain, and the brain literally gets shaken inside the skull.”

But, according to a new study, it’s much more common (64% more common, in fact)  for female high school soccer players such as Alex  to sustain concussions than it is for males playing the same sport. So what makes concussions more common for female soccer players? Dr. Mautner says it could be a few things.

“Something just as simple as girls report concussions more because they’re more likely to say when they’re hurt and not feeling well,” according to Mautner, could be one reason. There is also evidence to show that stronger neck muscles in men and their ability to absorb shock more effectively may lower their concussion risk, or that hormones may make female athletes more susceptible to sustaining an injury.

Female athletes may also take longer to recover from concussions. For both men and women, however, Dr. Mautner emphasizes the importance of not returning to the field too soon. “There’s no one test to say you’re ready or you’re not ready, so we see how their symptoms are. They need to be completely asymptomatic at rest, they need to be asymptomatic with exertion.”

The findings of the study are not intended to alarm parents or child athletes, but rather, to help raise awareness around concussion symptoms and the importance of taking heed to them when they present themselves. Nausea, headaches, confusion, drowsiness, sensitivity to noise and dizziness are a few of the most common concussion symptoms.

Thankfully for Alex, six weeks after sustaining her most recent concussion, she is back on the field and pursuing her next goal, to play soccer in college. We’ll be keeping an eye out for her on ESPN in the coming years.

For more information on Dr. Mautner or Emory Sports Medicine, visit:

Patient Story: Cynthia & Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Did you know spine surgery can now be done with only a small incision? Minimally invasive spine surgery is a relatively new set of techniques that has opened up surgery as an option for people who might otherwise have continued to suffer without surgery.

Patients often have the preconceived notion that spinal surgery will put them in bed and unable to walk for a long period of time. The fact is most spinal surgery does not lead to such a disabled state. And with minimally invasive surgery, patients can get back on their feet, out the hospital, and back to their normal routine faster than they’d ever have thought possible.

Cynthia Burnett is a great example of a patient who’s had minimally invasive spine surgery at Emory with excellent the results. In 2008, 56-year-old Cynthia Burnett woke up one day with excruciating nerve pain down her leg. Over the next two years, she suffered with this pain, despite multiple epidural injections. The pain just would not go away, even with the best non-operative treatment. Cynthia said she felt as if she’d aged 10 years. Her daughter recommended she come to Emory, where Cynthia saw one of our physiatrists, a nonsurgical physician who specializes in diagnosing and treating spine pain. He diagnosed a spinal stenosis (nerve pinch) and a slippage of one of her vertebrae on another. After careful analysis and discussions of options, she was told she’d be a good candidate for surgery. That’s when Cynthia came to me to discuss the surgical option.

At first, Cynthia didn’t want surgery. She said later, “My big concern about having surgery was the invasiveness. I’m healthy. I don’t go to the doctor very much. I haven’t been very sick. I just really didn’t want to choose to go under the knife.”

While not all cases can be treated with minimally invasive techniques, Cynthia was a great candidate for minimally invasive surgery. If this had not been the case, we could have used a traditional surgical technique with good results. But it would have required using, a relatively large incision to visualize the problem areas of the spine, thus a longer recovery time.

VIDEO: Cynthia’s Story of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery

Instead, with Cynthia, we used highly specialized retractors that are placed through small incisions with X-ray guidance to minimize the soft tissue damage. Through these small incisions, the spinal nerves were decompressed (“unpinched”), and the slipped vertebra was stabilized with a spinal fusion procedure. The factors that enabled me to do this include advanced surgical instruments, advanced imaging systems (three-dimensional computer-guided navigation), and years of surgical experience. These things lead to surgical results that are safer, less invasive, and more reliable than ever before.

Cynthia had the surgery December 16, 2010. Afterward, she said, “It was amazing to me how easy it was to walk around, and my nerve pain was gone immediately.” Cynthia also said, “It’s amazing to think they could do that with the small incision that I have. I wish I had done it years ago. And I’ve already told other people who are in pain, you need to go.”  She was truly thrilled. At Emory, our goal is to get patients back to health as quickly as possible. That’s what minimally invasive surgery is all about.

Have you had minimally invasive spine surgery, or would you like to learn more about minimally invasive spine surgery at Emory? We welcome your questions and feedback in the comments section below.

Dr. Tim Yoon, spine surgeonAbout S. Tim Yoon, MD:
S. Tim Yoon, MD, PhD, specializes in minimally invasive surgery and is assistant professor of orthopedic surgery and chief of Orthopedics at the Veterans Administration Medical Center at Atlanta. He is board certified in orthopedic surgery. Dr. Yoon started practicing at Emory in 2000.