Orthopedic Surgery

Emory Healthcare & Atlanta Hawks New Partnership

12938175_10153983279726397_3461086211474604166_nWe have great news for our blog readers! Emory Healthcare & Atlanta Hawks Basketball Club announced a new partnership. We plan to build a first-of-its-kind training and sports medicine center on Executive Park Drive in Brookhaven.

About Emory Healthcare & Atlanta Hawks’ Facility

Emory Healthcare & Atlanta Hawks’ new facility will serve as the team’s official practice site. Also, it will feature advanced technology in sports medicine and athletic care. It will be built within a state-of-the-art training center with amenities. The team expects to break ground this summer on the 90,000-square-foot facility. The Hawks Basketball Operations Department will be housed in the facility upon its completion. Emory will become the official sports medicine provider of the Atlanta Hawks.

“When we became owners, one of our top priorities was to provide the resources necessary to build a world-class training facility—a key element of being a first-class franchise that consistently competes at the highest level. We are thrilled with the partnership that Steve and Bud have forged with Dr. Boden and the Emory team in developing a new facility that will be at the forefront of how professional teams approach integrating sports medical technology in their training centers,” Hawks Principal Owner Tony Ressler said. “It is a privilege to be partnering with a local institution that is a world leader in the medical field and that also shares our vision and passion for excellence.  In addition, we are proud that this facility will go beyond benefitting just our players, but will also be a valuable sports medicine resource available to the entire community.”

The new facility will be the first in the NBA to be co-located with an entire sports medicine center. It allows for immediate treatment and on-site access to state-of-the-art equipment. Emory will leverage a part of the facility to offer preventative and rehabilitative treatment and sports performance training. Emory Sports Medicine Center will also make this new center its permanent home and treat patients inside the new facility.

What The New Facility Will Offer

Offerings at the new Emory Healthcare & Atlanta Hawks’ facility are set to include the following:

  • 3D motion capture
  • force plates to measure joint stress
  • on-site blood and sweat testing
  • analysis for nutritional deficits
  • markers vital for the creation of individualized health and recovery plans

A fully dedicated recovery area including cryotherapy, sensory deprivation tanks and in-ground hydrotherapy will also be on-site. All non-sports orthopaedic specialties will continue to be located two blocks away at The Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center.

“This strategic partnership will enable two outstanding organizations to create a new vision for sports medicine care and research for athletes at the highest levels of their game and translate this knowledge to our college, high school, and weekend athletes,” said Scott D. Boden, MD, Director of The Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and Chief Medical Officer of The Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital. “The addition of P3, the world renowned leader in peak performance enhancement, will make our facility and the city of Atlanta a destination for the most elite of athletes.”

P3 has been pioneering the use of advanced sports science technologies and front-edge applications in US pro sports. P3 specializes in quantifying athletic performance and developing precisely tailored training programs for elite athletes that boost individual performance and enhance career productivity.

Emory Healthcare is excited about the partnership to create this one-of-a-kind facility with the Atlanta Hawks and providing world-class care, treatment and training to athletes of all levels.

The Importance of a Second Surgical Opinion

spine-second-opinion-squareIf you’re one of the 13 million Americans suffering from back pain, neck pain or sciatica (pain running down your leg), your doctor may recommend surgery to relieve your discomfort.

While surgery can be life-changing for the better, it certainly isn’t a decision to be taken lightly. Surgery comes with its own risks and doesn’t always solve the problem. It may even introduce new ones.

You should get a second opinion before you have surgery. Don’t worry about offending your doctor. Second opinions are common practice. It can give you peace of mind that you’re making the right decision, especially if that decision is to go through with surgery.

Questions to Ask your Doctor

Before you jump into surgery, be sure to ask:

  • What is the likelihood of success?
  • What is the possibility of residual or worsened symptoms?
  • What are the risks of anesthesia?
  • What are the risks of spine surgery?
  • What is the chance of recurrence of my symptoms in the future?
  • What will happen if I don’t have surgery?

Rethinking Surgery

The good news is that most cases of back and neck problems can be resolved without surgery. In fact, spine surgery is only absolutely needed in a small percentage of cases.

If pain is the only symptom, then surgery is almost always elective, and the decision to proceed is based on weighing the risks versus potential benefits.

Surgery is usually the best option for severe weakness due to nerve or spinal cord compression; however every case is unique. Every patient has a different set of symptoms, exam findings, medical comorbidities (other health disorders) and life goals that drive the decision-making process.

Weighing the Options

Fortunately, most of the patients seen at the Emory Spine Center can be treated with less invasive treatments such as physical therapy, spinal injections or tweaking lifestyle choices that affect spine health. Usually surgery should only be considered once the conservative therapies have been exhausted. If you haven’t already, be sure to talk to your doctor about nonsurgical treatment options for your condition.

The decision to have surgery for most people with back or neck problems usually comes down to your lifestyle goals and desired quality of life.

For example, some people don’t mind living with a certain amount of pain and are content to manage it with anti-inflammatory medications. They can function well through day-to-day tasks and are willing to give up some activities, like running, in favor of lower impact exercise like walking. For them, they may feel the investment and risk of surgery isn’t worth it.

Other patients at this same level of discomfort may prefer to have surgery in hopes of less pain and more mobility. For some people, pain may interfere with daily tasks like doing the laundry or even just getting in and out of the bathtub. They may feel the potential benefits of surgery far outweigh the risks.

If your pain and other symptoms keep you from doing the kinds of activities you enjoy, and less invasive treatments haven’t helped you achieve your health and lifestyle goals, surgery might be a reasonable choice.

We Can Help

If you have been told you need surgery and would like a second opinion, then the Emory Spine Center is a great place to start. We will review your current imaging and obtain any necessary X-rays the same day. Once your records are reviewed and a history and physical exam are performed, we will give our own opinion on the best course of action. This will give you peace of mind that you are making the right choices for you and your family.

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About Dr. Gary

gary-matt-webMatthew Gary, MD, attended medical school at the University of Florida where he was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha for academic excellence.  Following medical school, he completed residency training in neurological surgery at Emory University. During his residency, he gave numerous presentations at local and national neurosurgical society meetings and received research awards at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and Georgia Neurosurgical Society.  He went on to complete a complex and minimally invasive spine fellowship at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital under the tutelage of Drs. Barth Green, Allen Levi and Michael Wang.  He is interested in all facets of spine health and maximizing patients’ quality of life with a focus on minimally invasive spine surgery.

Chondrosarcoma Patient Story: “I can now walk unaided and enjoy time with my family.”

skiiing patient storyI noticed something was “not right” with my right leg when I couldn’t sit crisscross-applesauce-style on the floor during my daughter’s music class. The tendon near my groin area was very tight and sore. Pilates exercises were difficult to complete and my left leg responded better than my right during daily activities. At the time, I thought maybe the pain was a sign of aging and simply that I needed more exercise and stretching. I continued to go about my daily life, living with pain that was sporadic and more of an ache at that point.

In March 2009, I was on a spring break skiing trip with my family when I noticed my leg felt “wobbly” during the downhill runs. I couldn’t control my right leg well and immediately knew something was wrong, so I stopped skiing. The next day, we went horseback riding and as I swung my leg up and around to get on the horse, there was a sharp stabbing pain at the top of my thigh. That was my big “ah-ha” moment. I knew that once I returned home I needed to seek medical attention, especially since the bursts of pain continued on and off throughout the rest of my trip. When I got home, I visited my primary care doctor who ordered X-rays, MRI and bone scan. After reviewing my results, my primary care doctor referred me to Dr. David Monson, an orthopaedic oncology surgeon at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta, GA. Dr. Monson met with me and explained I had Chondrosarcoma of the hip, which is a rare type of cancerous bone tumor.

Getting the news that it was cancer was startling and left me feeling quite shocked, especially after thinking the pain was just something having to do with the typical aging process. I was expecting them to find arthritis, not cancer. What made me most nervous was the type of cancer I had and its location in my hip. During the first visit with Dr. Monson that day, he walked me and my family through the different treatment options and then recommended I take some time to compare options. Like most people would, I went straight to the internet and began researching my cancer and different options. What I found scared me – up until five years ago, most tumors of the pelvis were surgically treated through amputation. This made me extremely anxious. I didn’t want to lose my leg.

During this tough decision-making process, Dr. Monson made me feel comfortable and at peace. He was extremely knowledgeable, very caring and direct. After reviewing my options with Dr. Monson, I felt sure he was the guy to do my surgery, so I made my decision and moved forward. Andre Roy, Dr. Monson’s Nurse Practitioner, was available any time I called and provided answers to my multitude of questions. I felt very cared for and looked after at Emory, and I was impressed with the office staff every time I came in for an appointment.

In the end, we decided that during the surgery to remove my tumor, we would reconstruct my hip using a saddle prosthesis. I was pleased that Dr. Monson knew how to perform this procedure comforted that is one of the few doctors that knows how to place such a prosthetic.

Following my surgery in November of 2009, I went through extensive physical therapy. Today I am walking really well and keeping up with my active teenage daughter. My range of motion is limited so minor adjustments have been made in my daily life to stay safe and comfortable. I’m thankful to be able to do all the things that I can do now, and continue enjoying life!

A note from Dr. David Monson

Bone tumors of the pelvis are uncommon and their surgical management depends on multiple factors, including tumor size, location and whether the tumor is benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These factors determine whether a limb-saving surgery is possible or not and if the losses associated with surgery may result in a non-functioning extremity.

Three main factors to consider with pelvis surgery relate to stability of the hip after surgery, and function of the sciatic and femoral nerves. A minimum of two out of three must remain intact for the lower limb to be worth saving. Fortunately for Mrs. Powers, both her sciatic and femoral nerves were able to be preserved and we were able to restore stability of her right hip with a saddle prosthesis.

Options for reconstruction of the hip joint after removal of pelvic bone tumors may include prosthesis such as a saddle, a cadaveric bone transplant (allograft) or sometimes no reconstruction at all. Each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages which makes selecting the right treatment for each individual patient unique based upon the factors above.

At Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, our goal is to always offer patients with what we expect to be the most functional, yet durable surgical reconstruction possible without compromising the long term likelihood of cure. These surgeries are often quite complex and can take as long as 6-8 hours or longer. Complications can occur and the recovery time after surgery takes anywhere from six months to a year. We want patients to be fully educated before heading into a surgery this complex.

Mrs. Powers has worked extremely hard with her physiotherapy and has achieved an excellent functional outcome. We are incredibly proud of her and most grateful that there has been no recurrence of her tumor!

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Three Emory Surgeons Named to Becker’s Spine Review’s list of Spine Surgeons to Know – 2016

spine250x250Woot woot – it has been a great 2016 so far for Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center! Three of our spine surgeons were recently named to Becker’s Spine Review’s list of Spine Surgeons to Know – 2016. Congratulations to John Heller, MD, and Tim Yoon, MD, on receiving this achievement. Combined, these three physicians represent seventy-three years of spine surgery expertise. Impressively, eight other surgeons named to the list completed their residency and/or fellowship at Emory Healthcare.

Read below to learn what Becker’s Spine Review had to say about our nationally recognized spine surgeons:

Scott Boden, MD: Board-certified orthopedic surgeon Dr. Boden serves as the director of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center and an orthopedic surgery professor at Emory University. He led the research on bone growth factor development and spine fusion technology. Spine and the Journal of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, among other journals, have published his work. Dr. Boden received the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ Kappa Delta Young Investigator Award, Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons’ Marshall R. Urist Young Investigator Award and five North American Spine Society Outstanding Research Paper Awards, among various other honors. Dr. Boden completed his fellowship at Case Western Reserve Hospital in Cleveland.

John G. Heller, MD: Dr. Heller is a spine surgeon and the Baur Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory Healthcare. He focuses on the research and development of instrumentation in cervical spine surgery, particularly in cervical disc replacement and laminoplasty. He was a Kashiwagi-Suzuki Traveling Fellow and he earned the Volvo Award for Low Back Pain Research. His additional training includes a fellowship with the University of California Medical Center in San Diego.

Tim S. Yoon, MD: Dr. Yoon is an associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Emory Clinic. He is an active researcher, focusing on gene therapy for disc disease. His work has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as Current Opinion in Orthopaedics and Skeletal Radiology. His clinical interests also include cervical fusion, compression fractures, disc degeneration, discectomy, herniated disc, kyphoplasty, kyphosis and laminoplasty. His additional training includes a spine fellowship in Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago.

About Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

Every day, the highly regarded physicians and surgeons at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center work together, across metro Atlanta, to diagnose and treat a variety of orthopaedic, sports medicine and spine conditions.

Our physicians use progressive treatment approaches – many of them pioneered right here at Emory and taught around with world. Surgical procedures and other treatments that are rarely performed at other hospitals are routinely performed at Emory. Learn more by clicking here, or call 404-778-3350.

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Pediatric & Adult Hip Dysplasia

hip-painHip Dysplasia

The thigh bone’s connected to the hip bone – that’s what the song says. But sometimes that connection doesn’t work so well, which is the result of a hip socket that is too shallow – a condition known as hip dysplasia.

The hip is the largest “ball and socket” joint in the body, held together by ligaments, tendons and a joint capsule. The hip socket is designed to hold the femur tightly to prevent it from coming out of the socket while allowing enough motion to permit a wide variety of activities. Hip dysplasia simply means that the hip is in the wrong shape, most commonly, the hip socket is too shallow and not positioned to fully cover the femoral head.

Most people with hip dysplasia are born with the condition. Many patients never have any symptoms of dysplasia as a child. However, if left untreated, many patients with hip dysplasia will progress to arthritis in their 30’s or 40’s, if not before. Hip arthritis can be a debilitating condition.

Treatment

Treatment for hip dysplasia depends on the age of the affected person and the extent of the hip damage. Infants are usually treated with a soft brace that holds the ball portion of the joint firmly in its socket for several months, helping the socket mold to the shape of the ball.

But some forms of the condition can develop later in life. Older children and adults usually require surgery to correct hip dysplasia. In mild cases, the condition can be treated arthroscopically — using tiny cameras and tools inserted through small incisions. However, if the dysplasia is more severe, the position of the hip socket can also be corrected or cuts can be made in the bone around the socket (an osteotomy) to increase its depth.

In many cases, the condition will lead to tear of the labrum and eventual arthritis because of damage to the cartilage in the socket. Total hip replacement is possible to improve pain and function in this situation.

Our providers have extensive experience in treating patients of all ages with hip dysplasia. The majority of patients with hip dysplasia are treated with surgical procedures including the periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) or “Ganz” osteotomy. This procedure, only performed by a small handful of physicians in Georgia, offers the ability to correct hip dysplasia and potentially avoid the need for a hip replacement. This exciting treatment has offered patients with hip dysplasia a hope for returning to normal activities.

Learn more about Emory’s experienced, board-certified hip specialists who provide the best possible treatment for a wide range of conditions affecting the hip. Pediatric orthopaedic patients should click here to learn more about the variety of pediatric orthopedic conditions we treat.

If you are considering a pediatric orthopaedic procedure at Emory, we encourage you to make an appointment by calling 404-778-3350 or completing our online request form by clicking the banner below.

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About Dr. Bradbury

bradburyThomas Bradbury, MD, enjoys hip and knee arthroplasty because of the consistency of success in the properly selected patient. Dr. Bradbury’s professional goal is the improvement in quality of life for patients with pain secondary to hip and knee problems.

His research interests center around infections involving hip and knee replacements which are rare, but difficult problems. Dr. Bradbury is researching the success rate of current treatment methods for hip and knee replacement infections caused by resistant bacteria (MRSA). Through his research, he hopes to find better way to both prevent and treat periprosthetic hip and knee infections.

Extending Nationally-ranked Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine Care

MSKmapRecently, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital was recognized nationally as a top hospital in the country for orthopaedics*, but did you know that we have more than one location? In fact, Emory offers comprehensive orthopaedic, sports medicine and spine care at multiple locations across Atlanta:

Clinic Locations:
★ Atlanta (also has an outpatient surgery center)
★ Dunwoody (also has an outpatient surgery center)
★ Johns Creek
★ Sugarloaf
★ Tucker

Hospital Locations:

  • Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital
  • Emory University Hospital Midtown
  • Emory Johns Creek Hospital

Physical Therapy Locations:

  • Atlanta (3 different locations)
  • Dunwoody
  • Johns Creek
  • Sugarloaf
  • Tucker

Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital is Georgia’s first and only hospital designated primarily to spine and joint replacement surgery. Each of our orthopaedic physicians has received years of specific training to specialize in his or her area of expertise and all use progressive treatment approaches, many of them pioneered right here at Emory and taught around with world. Surgical procedures and other treatments that are rarely performed at other hospitals are routinely performed at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine.

In additional to expanding our geographic reach over the last few years, Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has continuously reinvested resources and funding back into its existing facilities to improve research, technology and care delivery models, ensuring that the patient and family experience is unmatched. This commitment to delivering supreme care has resulted in our patients consistently giving us some of the highest patient satisfaction scores in the country**.

To see an Emory orthopaedic, sports medicine or spine specialist at one of our convenient locations, call 404-778-3350 today. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours.

*Ranked by U.S. News & World Report

** Ranked by Press Ganey

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Related Resources:
Orthopaedics at Emory Healthcare

What is Orthopedic Trauma?

ambulanceOrthopedic trauma is a severe injury to part of the musculoskeletal system, and often the result of a sudden accident requiring immediate medical attention. While not all orthopedic trauma is life-threatening, it is life altering. Therefore, your choice of doctors is extremely important.

Orthopedic trauma physicians are unique in that they specialize in complex injuries to bones, joints and soft tissues (like muscles, tendons and ligaments) throughout the entire body. Many orthopaedic specialists specialize in just one body part. Others may provide more general care but won’t treat more acute fractures, which are physically more difficult to fix. Orthopedic trauma physicians, however, receive training in the field of orthopaedic surgery with a special focus on the treatment of fractured bones and joint realignment to promote the safe recovery and return of functionality to injured body parts. So, they often treat patients with multiple broken bones, compound fractures and fractures near a joint (like a hip or knee).

Orthopaedic trauma surgeons are able to follow patients through all stages of recovery and enlist the help of other specialists, if needed, to treat complex cases. By maintaining open communication with all providers, they are able to ensure each patient receives the care needed to resume a full and active lifestyle.

Regardless of where a traumatic injury has been treated initially, patients can see an orthopedic trauma surgeon at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in our Atlanta or Johns Creek locations. Our surgeons are happy to give second opinions, provide specialty care for complex and multi-system fractures, or even perform post traumatic joint reconstruction. And, as part of the Emory Healthcare family of providers, our surgeons have access to all of the most advanced equipment, treatments and services offered by Emory.

About Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

At the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, our orthopedic trauma team understands just how life-altering a traumatic event, like a car accident or major fall, can be. So, we work hard to help patients recover from their physical injuries as fully as possible. We know that recovery isn’t complete after emergency surgery, therefore we provide follow-up care, respond to complications, and refer patients to other specialists when necessary in order to achieve the best possible outcomes.

Learn more about the conditions and treatments our Emory orthopaedic trauma surgeons provide. To make an appointment to see an Emory orthopaedic trauma surgeon, please call 404-778-3350.

“I woke up pain free”: Words from an Emory Sports Medicine Center Patient

mskpatientThe two years of my life before visiting Dr. Kenneth Mautner at the Emory Sports Medicine Center were painful. I had moderate to severe pain in my right interior knee joint. My symptoms were stiffness, swelling and sharp pains while I was sleeping, walking and even driving!

Finally I decided to make an appointment with one of the largest and most visible orthopedic clinics in Atlanta. During my visit there, they took an X-ray of my knee and diagnosed me with early stage Osteoarthritis. The physician suggested I first use over the counter medication twice daily to treat the pain and occasionally receive cortisone shots to help with ongoing pain management. If that didn’t work, he said I would eventually need a knee replacement.

After getting this news, I was a little uneasy. I thought to myself, “There has to be another option besides daily medication that could hurt my liver, or surgery.” After much prayer and research, I was led to the Emory Sports Medicine Center. I watched several of the patient videos and marveled at the success stories, from different conditions like hip and knee to procedures like Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy and stem cell therapy.

Without hesitation I called and made an appointment to see Dr. Mautner! Once at Emory, Dr. Mautner ordered an MRI, which revealed a bad meniscus tear and early osteoarthritis. In May 2015, we started Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Therapy, which took platelets from my blood and reinjected them back into my injured knee. The procedure took about 15 minutes and while it hurt, it was less painful than I expected.

The first nine days after the injection I experienced increased pain, but on the tenth day I woke up pain free and have not had any pain since! It’s amazing! The tissues around the joint have calmed and are not swollen. I have returned to my customary two-mile walk each day, and can go up and down hills and stairs. I can sleep and drive pain free.

I feel great and the treatment was worth every penny, which was minimal considering the wonderful benefits! Thank you Dr. Mautner and the team at Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Steve Alvarez
Patient, Emory Sports Medicine Center
Dunwoody, Georgia

Are you considering PRP therapy? If so, make sure it’s performed properly and with the right expert guidance. Learn more about why you should choose Emory Sports Medicine for PRP therapy.

About Dr. Mautner

mautner-kennethKenneth Mautner, MD, is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) with a subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine. He has a special interest in the areas of sports concussions, where he is regarded as a local and regional expert in the field. In 2005, he became one of the first doctors in Georgia to use office based neuropsychological testing to help determine return to play for athletes. He also is an expert in diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound and teaches both regional and national courses on how to perform office based ultrasound. He regularly performs Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections for patients with chronic tendinopathy.

Dr. Mautner also specializes in the care of athletes with spine problems as well as hip and groin injuries.

Dr. Mautner currently serves as head team physician for Agnes Scott College and St. Pius High School and a team physician for Emory University Athletics. He is also a consulting physician for Georgia Tech Athletics, Neuro Tour, the Atlanta Ballet, and several local high schools.

When is Spine Surgery Necessary?

spine-surgery-chatIf you have experienced ongoing back or neck pain, you may have asked yourself at one point, “do I need surgery?”

Low back and neck pain are common conditions that can range from dull, constant aches to sudden, sharp pains that make it difficult to move. There are many causes of spine pain, including injury, ruptured discs and the normal wear and tear that comes with aging. Some diseases and spine conditions may also cause pain, such as:
– Arthritis
– Scoliosis
– Spinal stenosis
– Spondylolisthesis
– Spondylosis

Seek an evaluation from a spine specialist if your pain is severe or persistent. The good news is that less than 10% of patients who experience back or neck problems are candidates for surgery. Many spine conditions can be treated non-operatively, but if you’ve been told you need spine surgery, it’s important to have the proper information before making a decision.

On Tuesday, August 25, 2015, at noon EST, join Scott Boden, MD, director of the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center, for an interactive web chat to discuss when you should — and shouldn’t — elect to undergo spine surgery. Sign up for the chat >>

Sign Up for the Chat

Related Resources
When Should You Consider Spine Surgery?
Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center
Should You See a Spine Specialist? Take our quiz and find out>>

About Scott Boden, MD

boden-scottScott D. Boden, MD, is Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Director of the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Boden started practicing at Emory in 1992. During his fellowship at Case Western Reserve Hospital in Cleveland, Dr. Boden trained with one of the founding fathers of modern spine surgery, Dr. Henry Bohlman. A primary original researcher on bone growth factor development and spine fusion technology, Dr. Boden is also an internationally renowned lecturer and teacher and the driving force behind the Emory University Orthopedics & Spine Hospital (EUOSH).

 

Dr. Boden’s Clinical Interests:
Dr. Boden’s areas of clinical interest include surgical and nonsurgical management of adult degenerative spinal disorders including herniated discs, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis in the cervical and lumbar spine. He was recently named in another Becker’s list of Top 50 Spine Surgeons in the U.S. and is a skilled surgeon with techniques of microdiscectomy, laminectomy, spinal fusion, and laminoplasty.

The Road to Emory: Education
• Medical School: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 1986
• Internship: George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. 1987
• Residency: George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. 1991
• Fellowship: Case Western Reserve University Hospital, Cleveland, OH 1992

Personal:
Dr. Boden is the proud father of triplets who graduated first and tied for second in their high school class. He is also a baseball aficionado and coaches high school and travel softball teams.

National Recognition for Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center

boden-scottIn the May 2015 issue of Spine magazine, a special review section highlights the 100 most frequently cited research papers on lumbar (lower back) spine surgery.

After reviewing more than 16,500 papers that matched the search criteria, the research team compiling the data determined 322 papers that were cited at least 100 times.

One of the top three most frequently cited authors was Scott D. Boden, MD, director of Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center.

“This [review] identifies those individuals whose contributions to the ever-growing body of knowledge have provided guidance and suggestions for further investigation,” says Samuel K. Cho, MD. Cho and his colleagues from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, performed the review.

Earlier this year, Dr. Boden was recognized in the highly regarded medical publication Becker’s Spine Review as one of the top 55 spine surgeons on the forefront of biologics & stem cell. Dr. Boden’s selection into this prestigious group was because of his work and research on spine fusion, spinal disorders and bone regeneration.

So what does this mean for patients? Dr. Boden, along with his highly-trained colleagues, are often recognized nationally and internationally for being on the forefront of research. The information discovered during research is communicated through research papers and publications and used to:

  • perfect and deliver outstanding patient care.
  • educate other physicians around the world.
  • train the next generations of surgeons and physicians.

Congratulations to Dr. Boden and all our physicians and staff at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine for your tireless effort in delivering leading patient care.

To see an Emory orthopaedic, sports or spine specialist, complete our online appointment form or call 404-778-3350.