Injury Prevention

What Should You Do When You Sprain Your Ankle?

Ankle SprainIt is estimated that 28,000 people injure their ankles every single day in the United States. This is mostly due to engaging in sports and is usually caused due to quick changes in direction, awkward landings from jumps, and stepping on another athlete’s foot.

If you have a suspected ankle sprain, you should see a doctor at the first opportunity to ensure proper diagnosis. Don’t try to just ‘walk off’ the injury and ignore it.

You can take an NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) to prevent the swelling from getting worse. Common NSAIDS include ibuprofen – such as Advil and Motrin, and naproxen – like Naprosyn. To manage pain immediately, take acetaminophen such as Tylenol. Just make sure to not do so on an empty stomach or exceed the recommended dosage.

After managing the pain, follow American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ recommended RICE method to treat the sprain early:

  1.  Rest - Rest your ankle and use crutches till walking is no longer painful without them.
  2. Ice - Apply an ice pack (or improvise with a pack of frozen peas) for 20-30 minutes at a time. You can ice your ankle 3-4 times for the first couple days or until the swelling goes down.
  3. Compression - Use an elastic compression wrap (ACE wraps work well) for the first 2-3 days. Don’t apply the wrap too tightly. Signs that it is too tight are numbness, tingling, pain or swelling below the bandage.
  4. Elevation - Lay on the couch, bed or in the recliner with pillows propping up your leg so your ankle is above the level of your heart. This helps to prevent excess swelling and bruises.

Most ankle sprains will heal on their own if treated properly and the patient completes the exercises prescribed by the physician or physical therapist. Surgery is usually only needed when there are severe tears in the ligament or if a bone is broken. Make an appointment with a sports medicine specialist to evaluate the degree of the ankle sprain and discuss treatment options.

Chat Online with Dr. Olufade About Ankle Sprains

Ankle Sprain Q&A ChatIf you want to learn more about ankle sprains, join us on Tuesday, May 27 for a live online chat on “Preventing, Diagnosing & Treating Ankle Sprains” with Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD. He will be available to answer questions related to the ankle such as:

  • What are the symptoms of an ankle sprain?
  • How do you diagnose an ankle sprain?
  • How do you treat an ankle sprain?

Sign Up for the Chat

About Dr. Olufade
Dr. Oluseun OlufadeDr. Olufade is board certified in Sports Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team. Dr Olufade is also the team physician for Emory University and Blessed Trinity High School.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports medicine injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in treatment of sports related concussions, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration. Dr. Olufade sees patients at our clinic at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

Dr Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

About Emory Ortho, Sports and Spine in Johns Creek and Duluth
Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350.

Warning Signs of Concussions Not Always Visible

Because the effects are not always visible, many athletes return to their sport too quickly following concussions and head injuries. Unfortunately, this can cause long-term negative health effects. That’s why it’s critical to educate parents, coaches and other athletic officials about the importance of having head injuries examined by a specialized physician who has experience caring for patients with concussion, which can occur with or without the loss of consciousness. Learn more about what we are doing at Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine to care for concussions and to educate the community on the importance of waiting to return to play following a head injury in this short video:

Related Resources:

Decking the Halls – Avoiding Potential Injuries

Common Injury PreventionMore than 250 people a day were hurt by decorating accidents between Nov. 1 and the end of December last year. Almost a third of these injuries were the result of falling off a ladder, while another large percentage were neck or back related injuries.

Here are some common injuries that can occur while decking the halls this year:

  • You could fracture your hand, wrist, ankle or other bone in the body if you fall off the ladder while hanging decorations.  It is also possible to dislocate your shoulder or tear the meniscus (cartilage) in your knee.
  • Herniating a disc or straining a muscle in your neck or back while carrying big, heavy boxes of decorations.
  • Doing all the decorating in 1-2 days? This increased activity may lead to acute tendinitis in the knee or impingement in the shoulder.

Here are a few tips to help you avoid injuries:

  • When using a ladder to hang decorations, make sure you have the correct type of ladder for the job. Also ensure that the ladder is sitting on level ground and have a helper on the ground to hold the ladder if possible. Don’t lean too far to either side of the ladder. Move the ladder to the spot you need to reach.
  • When carrying heavy or awkward sized boxes and totes of decorations, make sure to use proper lifting techniques. Squat down to pick up the box instead of bending at the waist. Don’t rotate your body as you lift. Pick the box straight up and turn your whole body to avoid straining a muscle in your back.
  • Decorating for the holidays is not something we do every day so our bodies might not be used to running up and down a ladder all day hanging lights on the house. If you can spread out the decorating over a few days or week, this may help you avoid a flare up of acute tendinitis or impingement. Another idea is to have a helper to assist you with the decorations.

We hope you have a safe and healthy holiday season. If you do end up with a injury over the holidays, you can trust Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine to take care of all your orthopedic needs!

About Scott Maughon, MD
Dr. Scott MaughonOrthopaedic Surgeon
Team Physician: Northview High School

Dr. Maughon is an orthopaedic surgeon new to Emory but has been a member of the community for over 20 years and is a native Atlantan. He attended medical school in Augusta at the University of Georgia, completed his residency training in Atlanta at Georgia Baptist Medical Center, and completed his fellowship training in Birmingham at the American Sports Medicine Institute.

Dr. Maughon sees patients in our Duluth clinic and performs surgery at Emory Johns Creek Hospital. He sees patients with any type of orthopaedic condition or injury but specializes in those needing shoulder, knee, or hip arthroscopy, joint replacement surgery, ACL surgery, or any type of sports medicine treatment.

When asked why he chose sports medicine as his specialty area, Dr. Maughon says, “To put it simply, I love helping others. I have always loved sports and it is so rewarding to help an athlete get back on the field and start competing again. I’m able to help that kid continue on and maybe even pursue a college or professional career down the road.”

About Emory Ortho, Sports and Spine in Johns Creek and Duluth
Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350

Related Links:

 

Emory Sports Medicine & Physical Therapy Partner with the Atlanta Ballet

Atlanta Ballet Emory Physical Therapy Partnership

Photo by Kim Kenney, Atlanta Ballet

We are very pleased to announce that Emory Sports Medicine and Physical Therapy is now the official medical provider for the Atlanta Ballet. We provide physical therapy, massage therapy, screenings, injury prevention and physician coverage for injuries for the Atlanta Ballet athletes. Marcia Toye – Vego with Emory Physical Therapy is the primary physical therapist working with the Atlanta Ballet and has been working with these talented athletes since 1995. Dr. Sam Labib with Emory Sports Medicine is one of the physicians that regularly treats the ballet performers when they need to see a doctor.

You can learn more about the partnership by reading the full article on the Emory News Center website.

Tips to Avoid Turkey Day Injuries!

Thanksgiving The holidays are a time to celebrate, spend time with family and hopefully enjoy a few relaxing days off from work. For many weekend warriors, “relaxing” means pulling together a game of football or basketball in the back yard. While these games are often enjoyable, many end in injuries such as:

Although some injuries can not be prevented, others can be prevented with some simple warm up measures and consistent muscle training.

  • Build a cardiovascular base. You should maintain your cardio base by doing cardio exercise about 2 times a week year round. You can do running, biking, swimming, rowing, and walking to maintain this base training.
  • Maintain proper nutrition. A balanced diet is important year round but especially during the holidays when temptations are all around us. Adding extra weight, adds strain and stress to the body and this could lead to injury.
  • Core strength. Develop core strength by doing simple core exercises on a weekly basis such as planks or crunches. Poor core strength can lead to a variety of issues, including back pain.
  • Dress correctly. Use the appropriate footwear and protective gear for the sport you are playing. If you are playing football, put on a helmet to protect yourself from a concussion. This could save you from an emergency trip to the hospital before you can even eat your Thanksgiving turkey.

If you do end up with a sports related injury over the holidays, trust Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine to get you back in the game quickly!

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350.

Dr. Mathew PomboAbout Dr. Mathew Pombo, MD

Team Physician: Johns Creek High School, Chattahoochee High School, Berkmar High School

Dr. Pombo is an orthopaedic surgeon new to Emory but has made a big impact on the community in his first 5 years of practicing. Dr. Pombo completed medical school at the University of Georgia, residency at Wake Forest University, and fellowship training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Dr. Pombo sees patients in our Duluth clinic and performs surgery at Emory Johns Creek Hospital. He has a special interest in managing sports related concussions. He also specializes in ACL surgery, shoulder, knee, and hip arthroscopy, joint replacement, and sports medicine treatments for pediatric patients through adult patients.

Dr. Pombo is very engaged with the community and serves as team physician for several schools and youth sporting groups. Dr. Pombo attended Duluth High School and is proud to be back in his community giving back to young athletes.

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What are the Signs and Symptoms of a Concussion?

Symptoms of ConcussionEarlier this year Governor Nathan Deal signed a youth concussion bill that will go into effect on January 1, 2014.  The new law mandates that if a young athlete is suspected as having a concussion he or she will not be allowed to return to their sport until cleared by a healthcare professional.

If not treated appropriately and released,  the young athlete can be at a higher risk for more concussions.  Multiple concussions can have a negative, long term effect on the brain by impairing memory and processing new information.

Schools can prepare for this change by educating teachers, students and coaches on the signs and symptoms of a concussion.

Symptoms of Concussion Include

  • Stiff neck
  • Blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Personality changes
  • Difficulty walking, speaking or using their arms
  • Severe headache
  • Vomiting over and over
  • Confusion that does not get better
  • Unusual sleepiness
  • Convulsions

Other important facts:

  • Over 50 percent of the youth concussions occur in football.
  • Approximately 10 percent of all high school age athletes will suffer from a concussion as a result of their sport in a typical year.
  • Only  10 percent of patients who suffer from a  concussion lose consciousness.

To protect our young athletes all coaches, recreational leaders and parents need to take an active role in ensuring young athletes who receive bumps/blows to the head get evaluated by a physician ASAP.

Related Resources:

About Dr. Olufade          

Oluseun Olufade, M.D.Dr. Olufade is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports medicine  injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in treatment of sports related concussions, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration. Dr. Olufade sees patients at our clinic at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

Dr Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

About Emory Ortho, Sports and Spine in Johns Creek and Duluth
Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350

When it Comes to Your Health, are High Heels Worth the Price of Looking Good?

High Heels Back PainEmory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine physicians Kyle Hammond, MD  and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD recently participated in “Ladies Night Out”  at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

The Ladies Night Out event is an annual health fair held by Emory Johns Creek Hospital for women to talk with physicians and other providers in the Johns Creek and North Atlanta communities and learn about services near them.

At the Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine table, Drs. Hammond and Olufade spoke with women about potential injuries that could occur from wearing high heeled shoes and what women might be able to do to help prevent injuries to their backs, ankles, feet, hips and knees.

As a fun activity at the Ladies Night Out event, we also had a free drawing for high heeled shoes that were displayed at the table.  Five lucky women went home with a new pair of shoes and lots of tips to prevent orthopedic injuries.

Emory Orthopaedics and Spine Team at the Ladies Night Out Event
Below are 5 orthopedic conditions or injuries related to wearing high heels and tips on how you can prevent them:

ACHILLES TENDINITIS

Symptom: Pain & swelling in lower calf and heel cord resulting in decreased calf flexibility

Achilles Tendinitis Prevention:

  •  Calf stretches with towel or band
  • Calf raises / strengthening exercises
  • Heel pads
  • Wear short heels or flats

ANKLE SPRAIN / FRACTURE

Symptom: Pain, bruising, swelling and inability to walk

Ankle Sprain & Fracture Prevention:

  • Wear short, wide heels (no stilettos)
  • Single leg balancing
  • Ankle ‘A, B, Cs’

BUNIONS

Bunion Symptom: Tenderness and prominence inside of the big toe joint

Bunion Prevention:

  • Ensure proper shoe size & fit
  • Wear short heels with wide toe box
  • Use pads to cushion bunions
  • Wear heels for brief periods of time if possible

KNEE AND HIP INJURIES

Symptom: Muscles in your hip and knee have to work harder when you wear heels as muscles become fatigued and more prone to injury

Possible Injuries:

  • Muscle strain
  • Tendinitis
  • Meniscus tear
  • Hip impingement

Hip & Knee Injury Prevention:

  • Stretch hamstrings, quads, & hip
  • Strength training for lower body
  • Alternate heels with flats during the work week
  • Balance exercises

LOW BACK PAIN

Low Back Pain Causes: Normal center of gravity changes, increasing the curvature of your low back and tilting your pelvis forward.

Low Back Pain Prevention:

  • Change into flats for long walking distances
  • Strengthen your core (crunches & low back extension exercises)

Although high heels look nice and are fun to wear at special events, try to limit the high heels to special occasions and stick with flats for your day to day activities.  Your body will thank you!

About Dr. Kyle Hammond

Dr. Hammond is an orthopaedic surgeon new to the Emory Orthopaedics faculty.  He recently completed his fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.  While at the University of Pittsburgh he was the Associate Head Team Orthopaedic Surgeon for both the Duquesne University Football team and the University of Pittsburgh Men’s Basketball team.  He also worked as a Team Physician for the Pittsburgh Steelers, the Pittsburgh Penguins, the University of Pittsburgh athletics, Robert Morris College athletics, as well as the Pittsburgh Ballet.

Dr. Hammond sees patients at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, as well as Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta.  Dr. Hammond has a special interest in the overhead/throwing athlete, ligament injuries to the knee, Tommy John surgery, joint preservation surgery, and is one of the few fellowship trained hip arthroscopists and concussion specialists in Georgia.

About Dr. Oluseun A. Olufade

Dr. Olufade is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Sports Medicine and Interventional Pain Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of  sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration. Dr. Olufade sees patients at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

About Emory Ortho, Sports and Spine in Johns Creek and Duluth

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth.  Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek.  Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon see patients in Duluth.  Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine.

To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350

Related Resources:

Injuries in the Young Athlete – How much is too much?

Student Athletes Injury PreventionChildren should be encouraged to participate in sports at a young age. Sports can teach children so many life lessons and helps children build their confidence. However, many parents are starting kids in sports at a young age in the hopes of developing their child into a scholarship athelte or a professional athlete. If a young athlete shows promise, many parents encourage their child to specialize in a specific sport and train year round from as young as 6 or 7 years old. This could be harmful because children’s bodies are still growing and developing. Young athletes are more prone to overuse injuries. It is estimated that close to half of the injuries in young athletes are related to overuse/overtraining. In addition to injuries, young athletes are also susceptible to overtraining syndrome and psychologic stress. Female athletes are particularly at risk for stress fractures and even delayed puberty.

With the exception of baseball pitch count research (which has studied how many pitches a young athlete could handle before injury), there is not conclusive research that indicates exactly how much is too much training for a young athlete. The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness recommends that young athletes should limit their sports specific activities to five days a week with one complete rest day from all physical activity. In addition, the same council recommends young student athletes take at least 2 months off a year from a specific sport to properly rest and rebuild their bodies. Young athletes should avoid playing on two teams in the same season.

Cross-training is good for the body. Our bodies are not designed to do the same thing over and over again, especially as youth and adolescents. It is also beneficial to play more than one sport. It allows athletes to develop more skills, be involved with a different group of teammates and coaches, and keeps them interested. It is also important to properly train the body in the preseason. In preparing for a season or a race it is important to increase training time/mileage by no more than 10% per week.

Sports are an excellent activity for young children and can help them develop life lessons they will use forever. Parents should be encouraged to pay attention to the child and allow them to rest and relax and take time away from their sport to rebuild and rejuvenate. Pay attention to a child who complains of muscle and joint pains, fatigue, or shows signs of psychologic stress. Athletics are a great way for youth to stay healthy and build a strong character, but remember that the number one reason that young people give for playing sports is “to have fun.”

About Jeff Webb, MD
Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools and other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

Related Resources:

Preventing & Recognizing Symptoms of Dehydration Among Student Athletes

Prevent Dehydration Athletes SummerDehydration is a common condition for student athletes practicing in the hot summer months. In fact, a student at North Forsyth High School recently collapsed at football practice and had to be rushed to the hospital where he was diagnosed with severe dehydration. Luckily, the student athlete was released that night and is now doing fine. In the CBS Atlanta news video below, Emory Sports Medicine physician Jeff Webb, MD, states that dehydration can be prevented.

Dr. Webb stresses to parents, coaches and players that it is extremely important to drink plenty of fluids before practice, during practice and after practice to avoid dehydration. It is also important to watch for signs of fatigue, cramping, profuse sweating and exhaustion in the student athletes. In order to prevent heat illness, it is important to take the heat seriously and prepare your body for practicing in the heat. Often times, coaches want to push student athletes to get them in shape quickly for sports season, but it is imperative that coaches, parents and certified athletic trainers, if available, closely monitor the students, providing adequate drink breaks and allowing the athletes to hydrate properly in order for the athletes to perform their best.

Check out the full video below!

About Dr. Jeff Webb
Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, and many other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

Related Resources:

Other Posts by Dr. Webb:

Tennis Isn’t the Only Thing that Can Cause Tennis Elbow

Tennis Elbow PDFTennis elbow is a condition that is caused by over using the wrist. This type of injury occurs when the tendon that connects the wrist to the elbow gets inflamed or tears.

In a recent interview with the team at CNN, Emory Sports Medicine physician Dr. Amadeus Mason was asked to speak about Tennis Elbow and answers questions such as:

  • What is Tennis Elbow?
  • What types of professions are most likely to cause Tennis Elbow?
  • How can you prevent Tennis Elbow?
  • How is Tennis Elbow treated?

Check out Dr. Mason’s full interview in the video below: