Chat

Stem Cell Treatment for Osteoarthritis – What is it and is it right for you?

Stem Cell ChatDid you know that physicians at Emory are now treating osteoarthritis by using a patient’s own stem cells? It is one of the latest advances in orthopaedic care and Emory Orthopaedics surgeon, Shervin Oskouei, MD, and some of his colleagues are doing the procedure here in Atlanta. Find out more about this unique procedure and whether it is right for you by joining us on Tuesday, August 12 for a live, online web chat. During this hour long, informal chat, you can ask specific questions about this groundbreaking new procedure such as:

  • Is stem cell treatment a good option for patients with osteoarthritis, loss of cartilage in the joint, or chronic tendon injuries?
  • What are the stem cell treatment options currently available?
  • Who is a candidate for this type of treatment?
  • Are there other stem cell treatments for osteoarthritis coming soon to the market?
  • What happens during the procedure?
  • Can you recover fully after this procedure?
  • And more…

To sign up for the live chat visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About Dr. Oskouei

Shervin V. Oskouei, MDShervin V. Oskouei, MD, assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University, is an expert in the treatment of musculoskeletal (extremity) tumors, total hip and total knee replacements and revisions. Dr. Oskouei started practicing at Emory in 2004. Dr. Oskouei is board-certified and fellowship trained in orthopaedic surgery. Combining his experience and interests with the state-of-the-art facilities of Emory University and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University allows Dr. Oskouei to treat patients with the latest modalities using a multi-disciplinary approach.

Related Resources

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s live chat on “How to Run and Train for Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures”

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the live chat with Amadeus Mason, MD, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine. Dr. Mason answered questions about how new runners can develop a plan for training and working up to a long race. He also discussed proper training before a marathon as well as running shoes and how frequently to replace them.

Below are a few questions and answers from the chat. You can see all of the questions and answers by reading the chat transcript.

Question:  Are there any special precautions of which “new” runners with low back pain should be mindful?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason:
Running should not be causing low back pain. If your low back pain was already present before you started running, or you are experiencing low back pain after running, I recommend you be evaluated to find out why.
 
 
 
Question:  I would love to become a runner. As of now I am training using the Get Running app. I want to know if this is a good way to ease into running so, that I may one day be able to run a 5K?

Amadeus  Mason, MDDr. Mason:
There is no one, single way to work up to running a 5K. While I am not familiar with that specific app, I would recommend some general principles to help prevent injury:

  1. Have a plan.
  2. Stick to your plan.
  3. Progress slowly and never increase pace and distance at the same time.
  4. Cross train, taking regular rest days. Consider running every other day.
  5. A 5K is only 3.1miles. There’s no need to be running longer than five miles at any individual session.

If you missed this chat with Dr. Mason, be sure to check out the full chat transcript!

Visit our website for more information about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Takeaways from Dr. Olufade’s Ankle Sprain Chat

Ankle SprainThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, May 27, for our live online chat on “Symptoms, diagnosis and treating an ankle sprain,” hosted by Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD.

With summer coming into full swing, a lot of us are out, about and getting more active. Some of our activities can lead to ankle sprains. Dr. Olufade discussed some common misconceptions about treating sprained ankles and exercises you can do to strengthen your ankles to help prevent sprains.

See all of Dr. Olufade’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: My son rolled his ankle this weekend at the beach. What do I need to do?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Great question! We use something called the RICE principle. Start with “R”est by staying off the foot, “I”ce the ankle for 20 minutes at a time every hour or two, use “C”ompression, like an Ace bandage, and “E”levate the foot as much as possible.

 

Question: What are some common mistakes that people make when they think they have an ankle sprain? In other words, what do people do to “treat” ankle sprains that can actually make them worse?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Ankle sprains can be associated with fractures. Some people try to “walk it off” if they think they have an ankle sprain, and without a proper diagnosis, you could actually be doing more damage to your ankle without knowing it.

If you do have an ankle sprain (not a fracture) I would recommend resting the injured ankle for 3-5 days. Some people worry and stay off of the foot for too long. Prolonged immobilization will make for a longer recovery. People often also make the mistake of using heat on the acute ankle sprain. Heat can actually worsen swelling, so ice packs are recommended instead of heat.

Question: How can you tell if you have a fracture and not just a sprain? Are there any additional symptoms other than increased pain?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Fractures are usually diagnosed by x-rays. You should see a doctor to confirm whether you have a fracture or not.
 
 
 
 
 
If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. You can also visit emoryhealthcare.org/ortho for a full list sports medicine treatments offered.

If you have additional questions for Dr. Olufade, fee free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

Are you a Weekend Warrior and Want to Learn How to Train for Summer Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures?

If so, join Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD for an online web chat on Tuesday, June 10 at noon. Dr. Mason will be available to answer your questions regarding running and other sports injuries such as

  • Prevention of injury
  • Stretching
  • Symptoms of certain athletic injuries
  • Risk factors for athletic/running injuries
  • Treatment for specific sports injuries
  • When to visit your sports medicine physician

If you are interested in learning more about preventing and treating sports and running injuries register for the live chat by visiting emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats!

About Dr. Mason

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children

Related Links

Emory Sports Medicine
Runner’s chat with Dr. Mason 2013 transcript
More Runners’ Chat Questions Answered
Tennis Elbow and PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Therapy – Is it Right for Me?

Concussions in Young Athletes – Chat with Dr. Mautner!

School is back in session for most of Atlanta and the surrounding communities and that means the start of fall sports!  While this can be an exciting time, it can also be a time where parents and coaches educate themselves in order to keep our children safe.   According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there is approximately a 60% increase in the number of concussions and traumatic brain injuries during the last 10 years.  In 2009, there were more than 248,000  traumatic brain injuries in young people under the age of 19 from sports such as bicycling, football, basketball, soccer and from playground injuries.

If you have a young child or a student athlete who is participating in sports and want to learn more about how to prevent, detect and treat concussions join us on Tuesday, September 10th at noon for a live online chat to discuss the topic. We will also discuss what the new law in Georgia regarding concussion means for your child.  Dr. Ken Mautner will be available to answer questions in an informal yet educational session.

Sign Up for the Chat

For more information or to register please visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About  Kenneth Mautner, MD
Ken Mautner, MDKen Mautner, MD is an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. Dr. Mautner started practicing at Emory in 2004 after completing a fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in PM&R with a subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine. Dr. Mautner currently serves as head team physician for Agnes Scott College and St. Pius High School and a team physician for Emory University Athletics. He is also a consulting physician for Georgia Tech Athletics, Neuro Tour, and several local high schools. He has focused his clinical interest on sports concussions, where he is regarded as a local and regional expert in the field. In 2005, he became one of the first doctors in Georgia to use office based neuropsychological testing to help determine return to play recommendations for athletes. He also is an expert in diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound and teaches both regional and national courses on how to perform office based ultrasound. He regularly performs Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections for patients with chronic tendinopathy. Dr. Mautner also specializes in the care of athletes with spine problems as well as hip and groin injuries.

About Emory Sports Medicine
The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory Sports Medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.

Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours in most cases. Call 404-778-7777 for an appointment.

Takeaways from our Orthopedic Hand & Upper Extremity Chat

Thank you to those of you who were able to attend the live chat with me on Hand and Upper Extremity conditions on Tuesday, July 23, 2013.  We had some great questions!  Many of the questions were related to when a patient should see a physician after an injury to the hand or upper extremity.  It is important that patients see a physician as soon as possible after an injury to avoid any long term complications.

Broken Wrist

For many hand and upper extremity injuries you can visit your primary care physician first and he/she can evaluate and if necessary refer you to an orthopedist or sports medicine specialist if it is an athletic injury.  If your injury is severe, many insurances allow you to schedule appointments directly with an orthopedist such as Dr. Gary McGillivary or myself, Claude Jarrett.  If you are not sure who to schedule your appointment with, call your primary care physician and they can help direct you to the correct place.

At Emory, you can call our Emory HealthConnection line at 404-778-7777.  This is a call center staffed by nurses that can help you determine the best physician for your specific condition.

Remember, the sooner you see a physician the sooner you will be back doing all the activities in your day to day activities.

If you were not able to join the chat last week, please review the transcript.  Also, for information on specific conditions, we have several blogs on hand and upper extremity conditions and they are placed below in the related links.

Thank you for your interest!

Claudius Jarrett

Claudius Jarrett, MDAbout Dr. Claudius Jarrett
Claudius Jarrett, MD is an assistant professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. He started practicing at Emory after completing a hand, microsurgery, and upper extremity fellowship at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. After finishing medical school at Northwestern University, he completed his orthopedic residency here at Emory University. His clinical practice and research interests focus on addressing hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder injuries.

Related Resources:

 

Tennis Isn’t the Only Thing that Can Cause Tennis Elbow

Tennis Elbow PDFTennis elbow is a condition that is caused by over using the wrist. This type of injury occurs when the tendon that connects the wrist to the elbow gets inflamed or tears.

In a recent interview with the team at CNN, Emory Sports Medicine physician Dr. Amadeus Mason was asked to speak about Tennis Elbow and answers questions such as:

  • What is Tennis Elbow?
  • What types of professions are most likely to cause Tennis Elbow?
  • How can you prevent Tennis Elbow?
  • How is Tennis Elbow treated?

Check out Dr. Mason’s full interview in the video below:

Take-aways from our Pediatric Orthopaedic Hip and Spine Chat with Dr. Fletcher

On February 5, 2013, Dr. Nicholas Fletcher, Emory Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgeon held a  live web chat to answer questions pertaining to the newest treatment options for pediatric orthopedic hip and spine conditions such as scoliosis, kyphosis, hip dysplasia, leg length differences and femoroacetabular impingement.

One of the most common pediatric orthopedic problems is hip dysplasia. Hip dysplasia occurs when the hip socket does not form correctly, which can lead to hip dislocation as a child grows, stated Dr. Fletcher in the chat. Unfortunately, hip dysplasia cannot be diagnosed in a child before birth, a great question which was asked by one of the chat participants. While hip dysplasia is not particularly common, mild abnormalities of the hip socket are regularly seen at birth, but parents should not be alarmed, as these abnormalities typically get better within a couple of months of a child’s life. One of the pediatric hip dysplasia treatment options Dr. Fletcher mentioned in the chat is called the Ganz Osteotomy, a procedure available at Emory. The procedure is used to realign the hip and settings of hip dysplasia when it is found in teenagers and adults.

Participants were also interested to learn that Emory is one of only a few centers in the southeast that offer hip preservation surgeries. Hip preservation is a surgical approach to hip problems in teens and young adults designed to prevent the need for hip replacement down the road. It usually involves realigning an abnormal hip socket into a more normal position or removing bone spurs in the hip that could lead to early arthritis.

Dr. Fletcher provided some great insights and answered some hard pressing questions from chat participants. If you would like to know more about the causes and treatment options of Pediatric Orthopaedic Hip and Spine conditions be sure to take a look at the live web chat transcript. Also, for more information on Scoliosis and on how to become a patient visit Emory Orthopedic and Spine online today.

Related Resources

Takeaways from Running Injury Live Chat

Dr. Amadeus MasonOn Tuesday, Dr. Amadeus Mason of Emory Sports Medicine, held a live chat that answered your questions about preventing running injuries. Dr. Mason provided some great answers to some very interesting questions; from how to prevent running injuries to the ideal length of time one should consider when training for a 5k and other long distance races.  Dr. Mason also provided participants with resources on things like: knee pain and strengthening and IT Band Syndrome.

The following is a recap of the live chat, or you can check out the transcript from Dr. Mason’s Preventing Running Injuries chat.

Q. Is it better to stretch before a run? After a run? Or Both?

A. For runners stretching for flexibility, it’s better to stretch after their run, because muscles are looser and more receptive to the stretch at that time. Dr. Mason also noted that while stretching before a run doesn’t hurt, runners should keep in mind that it’s best to spend at least ¼ of the time you spend running on stretching. As an example, Dr. Mason suggests if a runner trains for an hour, it’s best to stretch for at least 15 minutes.

Q. How does a runner prevent shin splints from reoccurring and preventing the pain’s longevity?

A. Runners experiencing recurrent shin splints, or moderate to severe pain in the shin that lasts for a long period of time, should see a specialist. Make sure not to train too much, too quickly, that’s one of the most common causes of shin splints, according to Dr. Mason. If shin splints occur, it’s recommended that a runner modifies their training regimen to accommodate for pain relief. Females, who experience shin splints on a fairly regular or recurrent basis, should contact their Physician.  Continuous shin pain is a possible indication that there’s some sort of hormonal imbalance or insufficient caloric intake from a female runner’s diet.

For more information on preventing running injuries, check out Dr. Mason’s chat transcript. You can also download the resources he shared in the chat by using the links below.

Related Resources

10 Tips for a Healthy Peachtree Road Race Run

Peachtree Road RaceRunning is great exercise for your health and your mind. Follow the tips below to ensure that you are in top form on race day. Have a safe and fun Peachtree Road Race!

  1. Hydrate yourself frequently before, during and after running in order to loosen muscles.
  2. Warm up and/or stretch before the race to loosen tight muscles.
  3. Run slower in hot weather in order to avoid heat stroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion.
  4. Use hand lotion on feet and areas of chafing to prevent skin damage and blisters.
  5. Don’t forget to use sunscreen to protect against sunburn.
  6. Wear sunglasses to reduce glare and avoid tripping.
  7. When your energy is gone, imagine someone running in front of you and pulling you forward.
  8. Get your rest! Sleep one extra minute each night for every mile you run. For example, if you run 30 miles a week, sleep 30 additional minutes each night.
  9. Change soggy, sweaty socks soon after the run and stuff shoes with newspaper to avoid moisture buildup.
  10. Pay attention to your body! If you experience pain during or after the race and it does not go away, something may be wrong. Schedule an appointment with an Emory Sports Medicine physician.

Related Running Resources:

Still looking for more tips? Check out the transcripts from a few of our recent MD chats on running using the links below:

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part I

Runners’ Chat with Dr. Mason Part II

More Running Questions Answered