Athletic Injuries

Find Out How to Prevent, Diagnose & Treat Ankle Sprains

Ankle Sprain Q&A Chat

Did you know that more than 9 million Americans suffer an ankle sprain each year? Well, if you are one of these individuals or want to learn more about how to prevent an ankle sprain join us on Tuesday, May 27 for a live online chat on “Preventing, Diagnosing & Treating Ankle Sprains” with Emory Othopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD. He will be available to answer questions related to a sprained ankle such as:

  • Can I prevent an ankle sprain?
  • What are the symptoms of an ankle sprain?
  • How do you diagnose an ankle sprain?
  • How do you treat an ankle sprain?
  • Why should I go to Emory for sports medicine care

Emory Orthopaedic, Sports & Spine physician Dr. Olufade is a dedicated non-surgical sports medicine specialist who can offer tips and suggestions to keep you healthy or get you back to health so you can get back to your normal active routine! Sign Up for the Chat Now!

What Should You Do When You Sprain Your Ankle?

Ankle SprainIt is estimated that 28,000 people injure their ankles every single day in the United States. This is mostly due to engaging in sports and is usually caused due to quick changes in direction, awkward landings from jumps, and stepping on another athlete’s foot.

If you have a suspected ankle sprain, you should see a doctor at the first opportunity to ensure proper diagnosis. Don’t try to just ‘walk off’ the injury and ignore it.

You can take an NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug) to prevent the swelling from getting worse. Common NSAIDS include ibuprofen – such as Advil and Motrin, and naproxen – like Naprosyn. To manage pain immediately, take acetaminophen such as Tylenol. Just make sure to not do so on an empty stomach or exceed the recommended dosage.

After managing the pain, follow American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons’ recommended RICE method to treat the sprain early:

  1.  Rest - Rest your ankle and use crutches till walking is no longer painful without them.
  2. Ice - Apply an ice pack (or improvise with a pack of frozen peas) for 20-30 minutes at a time. You can ice your ankle 3-4 times for the first couple days or until the swelling goes down.
  3. Compression - Use an elastic compression wrap (ACE wraps work well) for the first 2-3 days. Don’t apply the wrap too tightly. Signs that it is too tight are numbness, tingling, pain or swelling below the bandage.
  4. Elevation - Lay on the couch, bed or in the recliner with pillows propping up your leg so your ankle is above the level of your heart. This helps to prevent excess swelling and bruises.

Most ankle sprains will heal on their own if treated properly and the patient completes the exercises prescribed by the physician or physical therapist. Surgery is usually only needed when there are severe tears in the ligament or if a bone is broken. Make an appointment with a sports medicine specialist to evaluate the degree of the ankle sprain and discuss treatment options.

Chat Online with Dr. Olufade About Ankle Sprains

Ankle Sprain Q&A ChatIf you want to learn more about ankle sprains, join us on Tuesday, May 27 for a live online chat on “Preventing, Diagnosing & Treating Ankle Sprains” with Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD. He will be available to answer questions related to the ankle such as:

  • What are the symptoms of an ankle sprain?
  • How do you diagnose an ankle sprain?
  • How do you treat an ankle sprain?

Sign Up for the Chat

About Dr. Olufade
Dr. Oluseun OlufadeDr. Olufade is board certified in Sports Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team. Dr Olufade is also the team physician for Emory University and Blessed Trinity High School.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports medicine injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in treatment of sports related concussions, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration. Dr. Olufade sees patients at our clinic at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.

Dr Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

About Emory Ortho, Sports and Spine in Johns Creek and Duluth
Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350.

Emory Sports Medicine patient, Susie Hemphill: A Story of Recovery

Susie HemphillIn August 2008 I fell and hurt my ankle. Over the course of four years, I was treated by two different orthopaedic surgeons and was not able to participate in tennis or any other sports. This was devastating for me because I am an avid and accomplished tennis player. I was recruited out of high school in Illinois to play collegiate tennis at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. But as a result of my ankle injury, I struggled to walk. I almost gave up hope that I would ever play again after two failed ankle surgeries. It was so hard to even perform daily tasks that I was contemplating applying for disability benefits. I was miserable with life because I was in so much pain on a daily basis.

According to Emory Orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Sam Labib, I had a condition in my ankle where there was no cartilage between my foot and ankle bone. Dr. Labib gave me hope and said he could repair the damage by taking cartilage from my knee and putting it in my ankle. On, August 23, 2012, I had cartilage repair surgery at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center in Atlanta with Dr. Labib. It’s been a little over a year and a half since the surgery and I just keep getting better and better. Now, I am happy to say that I am pretty much as good as new and back to playing tennis as much as I want. I even recently made it to the City Finals playing Atlanta Lawn and Tennis Association AA1 Women’s Tennis. It is hard for me to believe that I was unable to do anything for almost four years.

Thanks to Dr. Labib, I am also now back to doing what I love professionally. I am a United States Professional Tennis Coach. It is so great to be back playing and coaching. I owe it all to Dr. Sam Labib. Dr. Labib is a caring, compassionate, exceptional, talented, driven doctor and I owe him the world for fixing me and giving my life back. I highly recommend Dr. Labib to any patient who has a similar condition.

About Dr. Sameh (Sam) Labib

Dr. Sameh Labib

Sam Labib, MD, is a sports medicine fellowship-trained surgeon and director of the foot and ankle service at Emory. Dr. Labib started practicing at Emory in 1999. He is an Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery.

He has lectured both nationally and internationally at many orthopedic meetings. His research has been published in several journals, including the JBJS, Arthroscopy, Foot and Ankle International and the American Journal of Orthopedics as well as numerous video presentations and book chapters. Dr. Labib is Board Certified in orthopedic surgery with additional subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine Surgery.

For the past 5 years, Dr. Labib has been nominated by his peers as one of “America’s Top Doctors” as tracked by CastleConnelly.com. Dr. Labib has a particular interest in problems and procedures of the knee, ankle, and foot. He is the head team physician for the athletic programs at Oglethorpe University and Spelman College, and an orthopaedic consultant to the Atlanta Falcons, Georgia Tech and Emory University.

About Emory Sports Medicine
The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory sports medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.
Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours. Call 404-778-7777 for an appointment.

Related Links

Tips to Avoid Turkey Day Injuries!

Thanksgiving The holidays are a time to celebrate, spend time with family and hopefully enjoy a few relaxing days off from work. For many weekend warriors, “relaxing” means pulling together a game of football or basketball in the back yard. While these games are often enjoyable, many end in injuries such as:

Although some injuries can not be prevented, others can be prevented with some simple warm up measures and consistent muscle training.

  • Build a cardiovascular base. You should maintain your cardio base by doing cardio exercise about 2 times a week year round. You can do running, biking, swimming, rowing, and walking to maintain this base training.
  • Maintain proper nutrition. A balanced diet is important year round but especially during the holidays when temptations are all around us. Adding extra weight, adds strain and stress to the body and this could lead to injury.
  • Core strength. Develop core strength by doing simple core exercises on a weekly basis such as planks or crunches. Poor core strength can lead to a variety of issues, including back pain.
  • Dress correctly. Use the appropriate footwear and protective gear for the sport you are playing. If you are playing football, put on a helmet to protect yourself from a concussion. This could save you from an emergency trip to the hospital before you can even eat your Thanksgiving turkey.

If you do end up with a sports related injury over the holidays, trust Emory Orthopaedics, Sports and Spine to get you back in the game quickly!

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine

Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine has recently opened two new clinics, one in Johns Creek and one in Duluth. Emory physicians, Kyle Hammond, MD, and Oluseun A. Olufade, MD see patients in Johns Creek. Mathew Pombo, MD and T. Scott Maughon, MD see patients in Duluth. Our new clinic locations care for a full range of orthopedic conditions including: sports medicine, hand/wrist/elbow, foot/ankle, joint replacement, shoulder, knee/hip, concussions, and spine. To schedule an appointment call 404-778-3350.

Dr. Mathew PomboAbout Dr. Mathew Pombo, MD

Team Physician: Johns Creek High School, Chattahoochee High School, Berkmar High School

Dr. Pombo is an orthopaedic surgeon new to Emory but has made a big impact on the community in his first 5 years of practicing. Dr. Pombo completed medical school at the University of Georgia, residency at Wake Forest University, and fellowship training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Dr. Pombo sees patients in our Duluth clinic and performs surgery at Emory Johns Creek Hospital. He has a special interest in managing sports related concussions. He also specializes in ACL surgery, shoulder, knee, and hip arthroscopy, joint replacement, and sports medicine treatments for pediatric patients through adult patients.

Dr. Pombo is very engaged with the community and serves as team physician for several schools and youth sporting groups. Dr. Pombo attended Duluth High School and is proud to be back in his community giving back to young athletes.

Related Links:

Injuries in the Young Athlete – How much is too much?

Student Athletes Injury PreventionChildren should be encouraged to participate in sports at a young age. Sports can teach children so many life lessons and helps children build their confidence. However, many parents are starting kids in sports at a young age in the hopes of developing their child into a scholarship athelte or a professional athlete. If a young athlete shows promise, many parents encourage their child to specialize in a specific sport and train year round from as young as 6 or 7 years old. This could be harmful because children’s bodies are still growing and developing. Young athletes are more prone to overuse injuries. It is estimated that close to half of the injuries in young athletes are related to overuse/overtraining. In addition to injuries, young athletes are also susceptible to overtraining syndrome and psychologic stress. Female athletes are particularly at risk for stress fractures and even delayed puberty.

With the exception of baseball pitch count research (which has studied how many pitches a young athlete could handle before injury), there is not conclusive research that indicates exactly how much is too much training for a young athlete. The American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness recommends that young athletes should limit their sports specific activities to five days a week with one complete rest day from all physical activity. In addition, the same council recommends young student athletes take at least 2 months off a year from a specific sport to properly rest and rebuild their bodies. Young athletes should avoid playing on two teams in the same season.

Cross-training is good for the body. Our bodies are not designed to do the same thing over and over again, especially as youth and adolescents. It is also beneficial to play more than one sport. It allows athletes to develop more skills, be involved with a different group of teammates and coaches, and keeps them interested. It is also important to properly train the body in the preseason. In preparing for a season or a race it is important to increase training time/mileage by no more than 10% per week.

Sports are an excellent activity for young children and can help them develop life lessons they will use forever. Parents should be encouraged to pay attention to the child and allow them to rest and relax and take time away from their sport to rebuild and rejuvenate. Pay attention to a child who complains of muscle and joint pains, fatigue, or shows signs of psychologic stress. Athletics are a great way for youth to stay healthy and build a strong character, but remember that the number one reason that young people give for playing sports is “to have fun.”

About Jeff Webb, MD
Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools and other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

Related Resources:

Take-Aways from Dr. Mautner’s Concussion Chat

Thank you for attending the live chat on “Concussions and the Young Athlete”.  As you know, concussions are serious conditions that need to be evaluated soon after they occur.   It is important that all parents, coaches and athletes should be aware of the signs and symptoms of a concussion in order to treat and heal properly.  If you were unable to join us, some key points we touched on during the chat are:

Question: What are symptoms of a concussion? 

Ken Mautner, MDAnswer: Symptoms of a concussion do not always arise right after the impact and they can last for days or weeks.  Some of the most common signs are:

How to Prevent Summer Sports Injuries

Emory Sports Medicine patient Shawn Ploessl is a self proclaimed weekend warrior who sprained his ankle after playing football on the beach with some friends this summer. Many people are like Shawn in that when the weather starts getting nicer, we want to get outside and start working out or playing in a pickup game of baseball or football with friends. The problem is that most of us jump back into outdoor activities after being dormant over the winter and don’t properly warm-up or prepare our bodies for this increased activity.

In a recent news piece by CNN, Amadeus Mason, MD, Emory Sports Medicine physician, gives hints on what you can do to avoid injuries in the summer. Weekend warriors can start preparing themselves for the summer sports season by doing some exercising in the winter and early spring. Some activities that Dr. Mason recommends during the winter are running, indoor strengthening, and indoor cycling or spinning. Watch the entire piece below:

Related Resources:

About Dr. Mason

Dr. Amadeus MasonDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

Concussions in Young Athletes – Chat with Dr. Mautner!

School is back in session for most of Atlanta and the surrounding communities and that means the start of fall sports!  While this can be an exciting time, it can also be a time where parents and coaches educate themselves in order to keep our children safe.   According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), there is approximately a 60% increase in the number of concussions and traumatic brain injuries during the last 10 years.  In 2009, there were more than 248,000  traumatic brain injuries in young people under the age of 19 from sports such as bicycling, football, basketball, soccer and from playground injuries.

If you have a young child or a student athlete who is participating in sports and want to learn more about how to prevent, detect and treat concussions join us on Tuesday, September 10th at noon for a live online chat to discuss the topic. We will also discuss what the new law in Georgia regarding concussion means for your child.  Dr. Ken Mautner will be available to answer questions in an informal yet educational session.

Sign Up for the Chat

For more information or to register please visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About  Kenneth Mautner, MD
Ken Mautner, MDKen Mautner, MD is an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. Dr. Mautner started practicing at Emory in 2004 after completing a fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in PM&R with a subspecialty certification in Sports Medicine. Dr. Mautner currently serves as head team physician for Agnes Scott College and St. Pius High School and a team physician for Emory University Athletics. He is also a consulting physician for Georgia Tech Athletics, Neuro Tour, and several local high schools. He has focused his clinical interest on sports concussions, where he is regarded as a local and regional expert in the field. In 2005, he became one of the first doctors in Georgia to use office based neuropsychological testing to help determine return to play recommendations for athletes. He also is an expert in diagnostic and interventional musculoskeletal ultrasound and teaches both regional and national courses on how to perform office based ultrasound. He regularly performs Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injections for patients with chronic tendinopathy. Dr. Mautner also specializes in the care of athletes with spine problems as well as hip and groin injuries.

About Emory Sports Medicine
The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory Sports Medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.

Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours in most cases. Call 404-778-7777 for an appointment.

Preventing & Recognizing Symptoms of Dehydration Among Student Athletes

Prevent Dehydration Athletes SummerDehydration is a common condition for student athletes practicing in the hot summer months. In fact, a student at North Forsyth High School recently collapsed at football practice and had to be rushed to the hospital where he was diagnosed with severe dehydration. Luckily, the student athlete was released that night and is now doing fine. In the CBS Atlanta news video below, Emory Sports Medicine physician Jeff Webb, MD, states that dehydration can be prevented.

Dr. Webb stresses to parents, coaches and players that it is extremely important to drink plenty of fluids before practice, during practice and after practice to avoid dehydration. It is also important to watch for signs of fatigue, cramping, profuse sweating and exhaustion in the student athletes. In order to prevent heat illness, it is important to take the heat seriously and prepare your body for practicing in the heat. Often times, coaches want to push student athletes to get them in shape quickly for sports season, but it is imperative that coaches, parents and certified athletic trainers, if available, closely monitor the students, providing adequate drink breaks and allowing the athletes to hydrate properly in order for the athletes to perform their best.

Check out the full video below!

About Dr. Jeff Webb
Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, and many other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

Related Resources:

Other Posts by Dr. Webb:

Understanding IT Band Syndrome

IT Band Syndrome IT Band Injury

Iliotibial band (IT) syndrome, also referred to as IT band injury or IT band pain, is an injury that affects the outside of the  knee and is caused when irritation or inflammation of the IT band occurs.

If you have ever suffered from IT band syndrome, you know IT band pain is a pain you don’t want to feel again.  The good news is that you can prevent IT band injuries with strengthening and stretching exercises. Pay close attention and follow the information/suggestions here and you may be able to steer clear from the pain of IT band syndrome!

What is the IT Band?

The IT band is the long, strong, thick band of tissue that runs along the outside of the leg.  It starts at the hip area and runs all the way down to just below the knee.  The purpose of the band is to provide stability to the knee during movement.

IT Band Syndrome Causes

An IT band injury is an overuse injury,  primarily caused by inflammation of the IT band.   Tightness in the IT band can cause friction  where the IT band crosses the knee joint.   Causes of IT band syndrome can include:

  • Running up and down hill repeatedly
  • Running on a banked or sloped surface (like an indoor track or edge of a road)
  • Running up and down stairs
  • Weak hip muscles
  • Uneven leg length
  • Excessive foot strike force

IT Band Injury Symptoms

  • Stinging sensation above the knee
  • Swelling or thickening of the tissue where IT band moves over femur
  • Pain may intensify over time and may not occur immediately during activity
  • Pain occurs when foot strikes the ground
  • Pain may occur where the IT band attaches to the tibia

Preventing IT Band Syndrome

  • Warm up and stretch before competing or practicing
  • Recover properly between events/competitions/practices
  • Improve core strength with Pilates type exercises
  • Avoid running on banked surfaces
  • Avoid running the same direction on the track all the time
  • If you have flat fee, where arch supports or orthotics

Check out the exercises in this downloadable document: IT Band Stretching & Strengthening Exercises (PDF). And in this blog post, you’ll find more information on preventing running injuries.

IT Band Syndrome Treatment

  • Rest – most runners don’t want to listen to this advice but rest really will help alleviate the pain
  • Anti-inflammatory medication
  • Ice the painful area
  • Improve flexibility by stretching
  • Physical therapy

We hope you can steer clear of IT band syndrome and keep your legs moving!


Peachtree Road RaceEmory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the AJC Peachtree Road Race.

Emory Healthcare is the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia and includes Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Wesley Woods Center, Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Adventist Hospital, The Emory Clinic, Emory Specialty Associates, and the Emory Clinically Integrated Network.

Come visit us at the AJC Peachtree Road Race expo in booth 527 to get your blood pressure checked and learn more about how Emory Healthcare can help you and your family stay healthy!


About Dr. Brandon Mines

Brandon Mines, MD

Brandon Mines, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics. Dr. Mines started practicing at Emory in 2005 after completing his Sports Medicine Fellowship at University of California – Los Angeles. Dr. Mines is board certified in both family practice and sports medicine. He has focused his clinical interest on sports injuries and conditions of the shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand, knee, foot and ankle. He is head team physician for the Women’s National Basketball Association’s (WNBA) Atlanta Dream and Decatur High School. He is also one of the team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons.  His areas of interest are diagnosis and non-operative management of acute sports injuries, basketball injuries, tennis injuries, golf injuries and joint injections.