Athletic Injuries

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s Chat on How to Train and Prepare for Summer Running Races

Running Live ChatThank you for attending the live chat on How to Train and Prepare for Summer Running Races on Tuesday, June 9 with Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. From tips for preventing shin splints to advice on how to train for a 5K, we were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here).

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Question: I have inflammation behind my knee. What can I do?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason: Inflammation behind the knee can be due to a number of knee conditions. Baker’s cyst are common and can be caused by injury to the knee, arthritis, damage to the cartilage of the knee, and other problems. Sprains (caused by overstretching and tearing of the stabilizing ligaments) can lead to swelling of the knee area as well.

Seek immediate medical attention if you are in serious pain, or are experiencing symptoms such as: paralysis, loss of sensation, absent pulses in the feet, the inability to move the knee joint, severe bleeding, chest pain, difficulty breathing, or uncontrollable pain.

Swelling behind the knee may not produce any other symptoms, but if your condition persists and continues to cause concern, seek an evaluation from a sports medicine physician or knee specialist.

Question: What is the best way to correct an IT band injury that has caused can imbalance and pain while running?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason: If treated appropriately with conservative treatment and resting of the affected area, IT Band Syndrome is usually curable within 6 weeks. If your injury was not appropriately treated, or not given adequate time to heal, the source of your current complications may be due to:

  • Chronically inflamed tendon and bursa, causing persistent pain with activity that may progress to constant pain.
  • Recurrence of symptoms if activity is resumed too soon through overuse, a direct blow, or poor training technique.
  • Inability to complete training or competition.

Until you are able to seek an evaluation from a sports medicine physician, I would discontinue the activity (ies) that are causing you pain so you do not further damage the iliotibial band.

Question: I get cramps in my calf when I run but not when walking. Is there a remedy?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason: Cramps are a result of a few factors, but dehydration and improper warm-up are the most common causes.

To prevent muscle cramps, runners need to consume enough fluid before exercising. Some healthy tips are:

  • Drink 16 to 20 ounces 45 minutes before training.
  • Drink 2 to 4 ounces every 15 minutes during a training session.
  • Before you begin your run, warm up with 5 to 10 minutes of low impact activity, like walking to warm up the muscles.

For more information about all our orthopedic and sports-related injuries, visit Emory Sports Medicine Center. Think you need to be evaluated by a sports medicine physician? To make an appointment with an Emory physician, please complete our online appointment request form or call 404-778-3350.

Related Resources

Is it a Sprain? Or is it a Strain?

sprain vs strainA common question we field from patients with injuries is, “Is it a sprain? Or is it a strain?” While they both result in similar pain and symptoms, sprains and strains are actually different injuries that involve completely different parts of the body.

A sprain is an injury that affects the ligaments, which are a type of connective tissue that connects bones to other bones. When a sprain occurs, the ligaments are either stretched or torn and depending on the severity of the stretching and tearing, can be very painful. Sprains most commonly affect the ankles, in particular the lateral (outside) portion of the ankle, which can occur from a variety of activities.

Strains, on the other hand, affect the tendons, the fibrous connective tissue that connects muscles to bones, or the muscles themselves. Strains involve the stretching and/or tearing of these tendons or muscles.

Symptoms of Sprains and Strains

The hallmark symptoms associated with sprains and strains are similar

  • Pain
  • Redness and/or bruising
  • Swelling and inflammation at the site of the injury
  • Stiffness in the affected area

Causes of Sprains and Strains

Sprains typically happen suddenly and can occur in a variety of ways. When a person falls or twists in a way that puts their body in an unusual position or is hit with an impact that does the same, sprains can occur. On the contrary, strains can occur over time as a result of prolonged, repetitive movements, or occur suddenly.

One of the most common causes of sprains and strains is participation in athletic activities.

Treatment of Sprains and Strains

Most sprains and strains can typically be resolved with the RICE method – rest, ice, compression and elevation. Depending on the severity of the injury, future treatment and recovery efforts may involve a combination of physical therapy and various exercise techniques.

Seek help from a sports medicine physician if you experience any of the following:

  • Cannot put weight on the affected area without feeling significant pain
  • Cannot move affected joint
  • Have numbness around the injured area
  • Have significant swelling and/or changes in skin color

With proper care, most sprains and strains will heal without long-term side effects.

Prevention of Sprains and Strains

While there is no true way to prevent all sprain and strain injuries, proper stretching and strengthening regimens can help keep your body strong and more resistant to many injuries, including sprains and strains.

The highly-trained physicians and surgeons at the Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center treat a wide variety of orthopaedic, spine and sports medicine conditions, including sprains and strains from the foot and ankle to hand and elbow.

About Dr. Olufade

Dr. Oluseun OlufadeOluseun Olufade MD, is board certified in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Interventional Pain Medicine. He completed fellowship training in both Interventional Pain Medicine and Sports Medicine. During his fellowship training, he was a team physician for Philadelphia Union, a major league soccer (MLS) team, Widener University Football team and Interboro High School Football team.

Dr. Olufade employs a comprehensive approach in the treatment of sports related injuries and spinal disorders by integrating physical therapy, orthotic prescription and minimally invasive procedures. He specializes also in concussion, tendinopathies and platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections. He performs procedures such as fluoroscopic-guided spine injections and ultrasound guided peripheral joint injections. Dr. Olufade individualizes his plan with a focus on functional restoration.

Dr. Olufade has held many leadership roles including Chief Resident, Vice-President of Resident Physician Council of AAPM&R, President of his medical school class and Editor of the PM&R Newsletter. He has authored multiple book chapters and presented at national conferences.

How to Train and Prepare for Summer Running Races – Join Us for a Live Online Chat!

Running Training Live ChatWhether you are a seasoned marathon runner or recreational jogger, it is important to train properly and know how to prevent injury.

If you are interested in learning more about preventing and treating sports and running injuries, join Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD, for an online web chat on Tuesday, June 9 at noon. Dr. Mason will be available to answer your questions such as:

  • Injury prevention
  • Stretching
  • Race-day tips
  • Symptoms of certain athletic injuries
  • Risk factors for athletic/running injuries
  • Treatment for specific sports injuries
  • When to visit your sports medicine physician

To register for the live chat, visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats! If you already have questions for Dr. Mason, go ahead and submit in advance so our team can answer during the chat!

Sign Up for the Chat

From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapies and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for a range of athletic-related injuries. Visit our website to learn more about the Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Injury Insight: Manny Pacquiao’s Shoulder Injury

This past weekend’s boxing match between Floyd Mayweather, Jr. vs. Manny Pacquiao may have been the most-watched pay-per-view event of all time, but all eyes are now focused on Pacquiao’s reported shoulder injury. Battling through the twelve-round fight with Mayweather, Pacquiao suffered further injury to his already ailing shoulder. Reports released this week confirm the athlete will need shoulder surgery to repair a “significant tear” in his rotator cuff.

Emory Sports Medicine’s Dr. Jeff Webb stopped by CNN to shed some light about Pacquiao’s injury, possible treatment options and recovery time:

What is the rotator cuff?

The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles and their tendons that wrap around the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder, attaching the upper arm to the shoulder socket. These tendons allow you to move and rotate your arm in wide range of motion. When the rotator cuff tendons are damaged or torn, the shoulder may become unstable and cause pain.

What causes rotator cuff tears?

A tear in the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Most tears occur as a result of wearing down, or fraying, of the tendons over time. Overuse of the muscles, especially in a person’s dominant arm, increases the risk of tearing. Lack of blood supply and bone spurs due to age are other causes. Shoulder injuries, such as broken collarbone or a dislocated shoulder, can also cause a rotator cuff tear.

What are the symptoms of rotator cuff tear?

  • Patients with a rotator cuff tear usually experience a dull ache in their upper arm and shoulder. Other common symptoms include:
  • Pain or discomfort when lifting and lowering your arm
  • Weakness with rotating your arm
  • Pain extending down to the elbow (but usually not further)
  • Neck pain on the side of the affected shoulder; Low dull headaches
  • With sudden tears, patients may hear a cracking noise and experience intense pain and immediate weakness in the upper arm

How serious is Pacquiao’s injury?

It’s hard to definitely comment without evaluating him in person, but reports of a “significant tear” can mean one of a few types of rotator cuff injuries, including:

  • Tendonitis: a condition in which the tendon is inflamed, irritated and/or swollen. Tendonitis is common in athletes and can occur as the result of tendon overuse, injury, or because of age.
  • Complete tear: when the tendon splits into two pieces, sometimes separating off from the upper arm bone.
  • Partial tear: when there’s damage to the tendon, or tissue, but it is not completely split.

In Manny Pacquiao’s case, the tear is extensive enough that surgery has been recommended. The goal of surgery is to treat his pain and restore the function of shoulder, preventing further damage to those tendons. While some patients can return to regular activities after six months, but in the case of professional athletes, especially boxers, we can expect the recovery time to be around nine to twelve months to allow for ample healing.

About Dr. Jeff Webb

Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. During his training and practice he has provided medical coverage for division I college football and other sports, multiple high schools, ballet, the Rockettes, marathons, international track and field events, and the Special Olympics. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting physician for several Atlanta area high schools, the Atlanta Dekalb International Olympic Training Center, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Perimeter College and many other club sports teams.

He is active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

Related Resources

At Emory Sports Medicine Center, our shoulder experts specialize in advanced shoulder procedures, including Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair, to treat and repair a wide range of shoulder injuries. Click to learn more about torn rotator cuff injury >>

Why are Sports Physicals Important?

Sports PhysicalsAfter months of being dormant during the winter, most children who participate in sports are anxious to get back in the game as soon as warm weather arrives. While increased exercise and participation in sports outweigh the risk of injury or illness, it is crucial that every child undergo a pre – participation sports physical before beginning practice with their chosen sport. In the United States, pre – participation exams (PPE) are required for student-athletes of all ages who want to participate in sports and/or sports camps.

But are sports physicals really necessary? Absolutely! A PPE provides the following prior to participation:

  • Identifies any potential life-threatening conditions, such as risk of sudden cardiac death.
  • Evaluates existing conditions that may need treatment prior to participation, or monitoring to avoid future injury.
  • Identifies any orthopedic conditions that may require physical therapy or other treatment.
  • Identifies athletes who may be at higher risk for violence, substance abuse, STDs, depression, eating disorders, anemia, asthma, hypertension, etc.
  • Reviews concussion history (if previously concussed, the PPE determines if the student-athlete is still experiencing post-concussion symptoms).

There are two portions of the physical:

  • Review of medical history: Student athletes and their parents need to come prepared to openly and honestly discuss all medical history. Knowing the complete history helps doctors identify conditions that might affect the student’s ability to participate and/or perform in their sport or activity. This is not a time to try and hide past injuries or medical conditions.
  • Physical exam: many schools perform partial physical exams, but if you would like a more complete physical exam, visit your family’s personal physician or pediatrician. He or she may refer your child to a Sports Medicine specialist if he thinks the child needs further evaluation for orthopedic concerns or if the student has had a history of concussions.

PPEs usually occur six weeks prior to the start of sports or camp. Most student-athletes are cleared for full participation following a sports physical exam, but those who require follow-up care are generally cleared from all potential complications within the six week timeframe.

For a more thorough physical exam, our team of sports medicine specialists would appreciate the opportunity to evaluate you or your loved one at one of our three clinic locations. To make an appointment, call 404-778-3350 or make an appointment.

Emory Sports Medicine Center is conducting several upcoming sports physicals in partnership with schools across metro Atlanta. Check the dates below to see if your student-athlete is eligible to participate.

  • Berkmar High School – Thursday, April 2 from 3:30 to 6p.m.
  • Johns Creek High School – Saturday, April 18 from 9a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • Northview High School – Saturday, April 18 from 9a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • Decatur High School – Wednesday, April 29 from 5 to 7:00 p.m.
  • West Forsyth High School –Thursday, April 30 from 4:30 to 6:30p.m.
  • Blessed TrinityHigh School – Wednesday, April 22 at 2:30 p.m.
  • Atlanta Girls’ School – Wednesday, May 6 at 2 p.m.
  • Pace Academy – Tuesday, May 19 from 12 to 3 p.m.

About Dr. Jeff Webb
Jeffrey Webb, MDJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team. He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, and many other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.

Related Resources

Emory Sports Medicine Center
Preventing & Recognizing Symptoms of Dehydration Among Student Athletes
Understanding Exercise Induced Asthma
Injuries in the Young Athlete – How much is too much?

4 Healthy Tips to Winter-Proof Your Outdoor Workout

During the winter months, exercising outside takes not only motivation, but proper preparation to prevent injury. Emory Sports Medicine physician Amadeus Mason, MD, shares ways to keep your body safe and warm while exercising in the cold. Below are a few healthy tips to help prevent injury:

  • Make sure to warm-up before starting to exercise
  • Keep your fingers, nose and ears covered
  • Make sure to stay hydrated
  • Invest in proper work-out clothes using materials designed to balance body temperature and help with perspiration

For more tips on how to stay safe, warm and dry while training in cold weather, view the full FOX 5 News segment.

Atlanta News, Weather, Traffic, and Sports | FOX 5

About Emory Sports Medicine

The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta, Dunwoody, Duluth, Johns Creek and the state of Georgia. Constantly conducting research and developing new techniques, Emory sports medicine specialists are experienced in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of sports injuries.

Our sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Our doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours. Call 404-778-7777 today.

About Dr. Mason

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University.

He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, orthopedic stem cell therapy and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapy. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track & Field, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He is an annual speaker at the pre-race expo for PTRR, Publix marathon and Atlanta marathon commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

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Knee Arthroscopy and Knee Arthroscopy Recovery

knee surgeryKnee arthroscopy is surgery that uses a tiny camera (arthroscope) to look inside your knee. Small cuts are made to insert the camera and small surgical tools into your knee for the procedure.

Your surgeon can use arthroscopy to feel, repair or remove damaged tissue. To do this, small surgical instruments are inserted through other incisions around your knee.

Preparation for Knee Arthroscopy:

Usually no significant pre operative testing is needed. Depending on your heath, your orthopaedic surgeon may order pre-operative tests. These may include blood counts, an EKG (electrocardiogram), and even a complete physical examination to assess your health and identify any problems that could interfere with your surgery.

Surgery for Knee Arthroscopy:

During the procedure, the orthopedic surgeon inserts the arthroscope (a small camera instrument about the size of a pencil) into your knee joint through a small incision in the knee. A sterile solution will be used to fill the knee joint and rinse away any cloudy fluid. This helps your surgeon see your knee clearly so that he may diagnose the problem and determine what treatment is needed.

Arthroscopy for the knee is most commonly used for:

  • Removal or repair of torn meniscal or articular cartilage
  • Reconstruction of a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)
  • Removal of loose fragments of bone or cartilage
  • Removal of inflamed synovial tissue

After your procedure has concluded, a doctor will remove the instruments and close the incisions with a stitch.

Recovery from Knee Arthroscopy

Recovery from knee arthroscopy is much faster than traditional open knee surgery. You may have some slight swelling in the knee after surgery. Keep your leg elevated as much as possible for the first few days following surgery and ice your knee following the instructions given by your doctor. You may or may not be placed on crutches. Your surgeon will make that decision and discuss with you. Your surgeon will most likely prescribe physical therapy for 6-12 weeks, as well.

About Dr. John Xerogeanes

John Xerogeanes MD

John W. Xerogeanes, MD, Chief of Sports Medicine at Emory University, is known as Dr. “X” by his staff and patients. He is an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University as well as an Adjunct Professor at Georgia State and Mercer University. Dr. X has been the Head Orthopaedist and Team Physician for Georgia Tech, Emory University, Agnes Scott College and the Atlanta Dream of the WNBA since 2001. He specializes in ACL and ACL revision surgery performing over 200 of these operations each year. He is board certified in orthopaedic surgery and has his sub-specialty certification in orthopaedic sports medicine.

Dr. Xerogeanes has been recognized as one of US News & World Report’s Top Doctors with a special distinction listing him among the top 1% in the nation in his specialty.

Related Resources:

Rotator Cuff Surgery

rotator cuffThe rotator cuff is a group of four tendons and their attached muscles that stabilize the shoulder and allow you to raise and rotate your arm. The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint with three main bones: the upper arm bone (humerus), the collarbone (clavicle), and the shoulder blade (scapula). The rotator cuff helps keep the ball of the arm bone seated into the socket of the shoulder blade.

When the tendons and muscles of the rotator cuff are overly stretched or damaged, the shoulder may begin to hurt. Patients with a rotator cuff tear usually have a dull ache in their upper arm in the area of the deltoid muscle. Neck pain on the same side may develop over time, as well as dull headaches. Patients may experience weakness or “popping” in the shoulder. and have difficulty with over-head shoulder activities (tennis, swimming, getting dressed). Night pain is a common finding with rotator cuff injuries, and may result in the inability to sleep.

If you’ve torn your rotator cuff, your doctor may recommend surgery if your pain does not improve with nonsurgical methods. These include exercises using light weights and rubber bands, anti-inflammatory medications and massage to relieve discomfort. Continued pain and inability to perform the activities of daily living are the primary indications for surgery, and if you’re very active and use your arms for overhead work or sports, your doctor may also suggest surgery.

Surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff most typically involves sewing the torn edges of the tendon to their insertion on the top of the humerus, but partial tears may only require a trimming or smoothing procedure (debridement) to remove loose fragments of tendon, thickened bursa, and other debris from around the shoulder joint.

In open shoulder surgery, a surgeon makes an incision in the shoulder to open it and view the shoulder directly while repairing it. However, most tears can be fixed via arthroscopic surgery. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a minimally invasive technique for repairing a damaged rotator cuff. Using a small fiberoptic camera, the surgeon repairs the rotator cuff through 2-3 small incisions (portals) in the shoulder. Arthroscopic techniques result in less pain and stiffness, thus leading to a faster initial recovery time. Because arthroscopic tools are thin, your surgeon can use very small incisions, rather than the larger incision needed for standard, open surgery.

Surgery for rotator cuff repair requires significant recovery time. The patient will most likely wear a sling for four to six weeks. It will take approximately 3 months for initial healing of the tendon, but patients may begin light activities, such as writing and typing, almost immediately after surgery. Light weightlifting and shoulder strengthening begins 10-12 weeks post-operatively. You may not have significant pain relief or an increase in motion for several months following rotator cuff surgery. The healing process, coupled with physical therapy takes an extended period of time, sometimes up to six to nine months for a full recovery.

About Dr. Karas

Spero Karas, MDSpero Karas, MD,  is the Director of the Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Program and an Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University. Dr. Karas is an internationally recognized expert in his field, which includes sports medicine, surgery of the shoulder and knee, and arthroscopic surgery. He has been recognized as one of America’s “Top Orthopaedic Doctors” in Men’s Health Magazine April 2007 and “Top Sports Medicine Specialists for Women” in Women’s Health Magazine. Atlanta Magazine has named him “Atlanta’s Most Trusted Sports Medicine Specialist” for the past eight years.

Dr. Karas came to Emory in 2005, after serving as Chief of the Shoulder Service and team physician at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He currently serves as team physician for the Atlanta Falcons, as well as a consulting team physician for Emory University and Georgia Tech athletics. He cares for patients and athletes of all levels: professional, collegiate, scholastic, and recreational.

Related Resources:

Takeaways from Dr. Mason’s live chat on “How to Run and Train for Running Races and Other Athletic Adventures”

Thank you to everyone who joined us for the live chat with Amadeus Mason, MD, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine. Dr. Mason answered questions about how new runners can develop a plan for training and working up to a long race. He also discussed proper training before a marathon as well as running shoes and how frequently to replace them.

Below are a few questions and answers from the chat. You can see all of the questions and answers by reading the chat transcript.

Question:  Are there any special precautions of which “new” runners with low back pain should be mindful?

Amadeus Mason, MDDr. Mason:
Running should not be causing low back pain. If your low back pain was already present before you started running, or you are experiencing low back pain after running, I recommend you be evaluated to find out why.
 
 
 
Question:  I would love to become a runner. As of now I am training using the Get Running app. I want to know if this is a good way to ease into running so, that I may one day be able to run a 5K?

Amadeus  Mason, MDDr. Mason:
There is no one, single way to work up to running a 5K. While I am not familiar with that specific app, I would recommend some general principles to help prevent injury:

  1. Have a plan.
  2. Stick to your plan.
  3. Progress slowly and never increase pace and distance at the same time.
  4. Cross train, taking regular rest days. Consider running every other day.
  5. A 5K is only 3.1miles. There’s no need to be running longer than five miles at any individual session.

If you missed this chat with Dr. Mason, be sure to check out the full chat transcript!

Visit our website for more information about Emory Sports Medicine Center.

Takeaways from Dr. Olufade’s Ankle Sprain Chat

Ankle SprainThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, May 27, for our live online chat on “Symptoms, diagnosis and treating an ankle sprain,” hosted by Emory Orthopaedics, Sports & Spine physician Oluseun Olufade, MD.

With summer coming into full swing, a lot of us are out, about and getting more active. Some of our activities can lead to ankle sprains. Dr. Olufade discussed some common misconceptions about treating sprained ankles and exercises you can do to strengthen your ankles to help prevent sprains.

See all of Dr. Olufade’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: My son rolled his ankle this weekend at the beach. What do I need to do?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Great question! We use something called the RICE principle. Start with “R”est by staying off the foot, “I”ce the ankle for 20 minutes at a time every hour or two, use “C”ompression, like an Ace bandage, and “E”levate the foot as much as possible.

 

Question: What are some common mistakes that people make when they think they have an ankle sprain? In other words, what do people do to “treat” ankle sprains that can actually make them worse?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Ankle sprains can be associated with fractures. Some people try to “walk it off” if they think they have an ankle sprain, and without a proper diagnosis, you could actually be doing more damage to your ankle without knowing it.

If you do have an ankle sprain (not a fracture) I would recommend resting the injured ankle for 3-5 days. Some people worry and stay off of the foot for too long. Prolonged immobilization will make for a longer recovery. People often also make the mistake of using heat on the acute ankle sprain. Heat can actually worsen swelling, so ice packs are recommended instead of heat.

Question: How can you tell if you have a fracture and not just a sprain? Are there any additional symptoms other than increased pain?

Oluseun Olufade, MDDr. Olufade: Fractures are usually diagnosed by x-rays. You should see a doctor to confirm whether you have a fracture or not.
 
 
 
 
 
If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. You can also visit emoryhealthcare.org/ortho for a full list sports medicine treatments offered.

If you have additional questions for Dr. Olufade, fee free to leave a comment in our comments area below.