Posts Tagged ‘women’s health’

Ladies Night Out: Join Us for an Evening of Healthy Indulgence!

Ladies Night Out EventIt’s become a fall tradition. Emory Johns Creek Hospital is once again hosting its Annual Ladies’ Night Out, Thursday, October 17 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Physicians Plaza. RSVP by calling: 678-474-8200.

This free event provides women of all ages free health screenings (including glucose, cholesterol, bone density, blood pressure, BMI, and skin screenings), casual conversations with physicians over dessert and coffee and a chance to win door prizes.

A number of local vendors will be on hand, offering products and services directly tailored for women, including skin care products and sun damage screenings. Chair massages will be provided, as well, says Community Relations Director, Beverly Miller who coordinates the event each year with the Junior League of Gwinnett and North Fulton Counties.

Also on tap will be a panel discussion focused on “A Younger, Healthier You” and tours of the new Center for Breast Care. Free gifts will be provided to guests who attend the panel and tour.

Call 678-474-8200 to let us know you are coming or if you need more information. Registration is not required, but is very much appreciated. You can also RSVP on Facebook!

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New Application for an Old Technique

Dr. Gail Peters talks about a non-surgical treatment for uterine fibroids

Many women who have uterine fibroids go through their days with no noticeable symptoms. They may even be unaware they have fibroids at all. However, for a small percentage who have symptoms, daily life can be interrupted continually by pain.

Uterine fibroids can cause a host of disruptive symptoms: unusually heavy or long menstrual periods, pain during sexual intercourse, pressure on the bladder leading to frequent trips to the bathroom, bloating, and pain in the pelvis, legs, or lower back. They affect 20% to 40% of women 20 years or older and occur in half of African American women. So far, doctors are unable to pinpoint why fibroids are more common in African Americans or why women develop them at all. But they do know that heredity and obesity are factors.

Women with problematic uterine fibroids traditionally have had only two options—a hysterectomy or a myomectomy (surgical removal of the fibroids). In fact, unwanted fibroid symptoms trigger approximately 150,000 hysterectomies each year.

Over the past decade, an old technique is providing women who suffer with uterine fibroids with a nonsurgical alternative. Physicians have used embolization for more than two decades to treat pelvic bleeding or trauma, and now they are using the procedure to shrink uterine fibroids too.

“If a gynecologist has offered a hysterectomy, a women should look into uterine fibroid embolization,” says Emory interventional radiologist Gail Peters. “The procedure is less invasive, better tolerated, and requires less time for recuperation.”

Although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes embolization as a viable treatment for uterine fibroids, Peters says that some doctors are failing to talk to women about the option. “Most women come to me on their own and are looking for an alternative to surgery,” she says

What she tells them is that embolization offers fewer complications and a quicker recovery than surgical options. It has an 85% to 92% success rate compared with myomectomy, after which 10% to 30% of patients develop fibroids again. And women who experience embolization can fore-go the three- to four-day hospital stays and four to six weeks of recovery that accompany hysterectomies.

An embolization is performed through a small puncture in a groin artery. Dye is injected into the artery to identify which blood vessels supply the uterus and fibroids. The radiologist then guides a wire and catheter into the identified vessels and injects small particles that block the blood supply to the fibroids. The fibroids and the uterus shrink approximately 60% in the first year. Heavy periods usually take a few cycles to lessen. The procedure takes approximately an hour followed by a day’s stay in the hospital for intravenous pain medication. Patients usually can resume normal activity after a week.

“Most of the women I’ve treated report a significant improvement in their symptoms at their first-month check-up,” Peters says.

Learn more in person at a free seminar on Thursday, February 3rd. Call 404-778-7777 or go online to register. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 404-712-7033.