Posts Tagged ‘web chat’

Healthy Thanksgiving Day Recipes – Don’t Choose Between Health and Flavor!

heatlhy thanksgiving dinnerThanksgiving. This highly-anticipated day marks the beginning of the holiday season—the time of year when we usually fall off the wagon and overindulge on fattening food and drink. With so many delicious recipes out there that seem to appear in endless quantities at our dinner tables, it’s understandable that we may indulge here and there. Just remember—everything good comes in moderation. Don’t be afraid to treat yourself every now and then, but make an attempt to maintain healthy meals at least 80% of the time. In the spirit of giving and moderation, here are a few recipes to help you cut unnecessary calories from your Thanksgiving menu without cutting the flavor or fun!

Healthy Turkey Recipes

Your turkey doesn’t need a full tub of butter to be moist, nor does it require brining days in advance for flavor. Try out this recipe instead: Cornbread-Crusted Turkey.

This recipe calls for healthier ingredients such as low-sodium chicken broth and skinless turkey fillets to cut down fat and excess salt. It also includes carrots and sage for an extra boost of flavor.

Healthy Thanksgiving Side Dishes

Side-dishes can be your biggest enemy if you’re not careful. Traditional side dishes can be filled with sugar, butter and cream, but if you’re willing to branch out, here are a couple of suggestions for lighter, healthier options:

Sweet Potato Casserole
Just putting a slightly healthier spin on a classic. This still contains butter and sugar, so watch your serving size and enjoy!

Mashed Cauliflower (instead of mashed potatoes)
Here, we’re simply substituting a high-fiber vegetable like cauliflower for the potatoes. This shaves off calories and carbs while adding more nutrients. Cauliflower is a nutrient powerhouse, loaded with more calcium, fiber, vitamin C, folate, and vitamin K than a comparable amount of white potatoes.

Lemon-Garlic Roasted Potatoes
Leave the unhealthy add-ons to baked potatoes at the door. Stick with lemon and garlic for seasoning with this delicious recipe that totals about 69 calories per serving.

Mock Sour Cream
If you do decide you want to add the sour cream to your mashed potatoes and other sides, here’s a tip for making a healthier version (only 11 calories per TBSP)!

Greek Yogurt Subsitutes
Both low- and non-fat versions of Greek and traditional plain yogurts can play a part in a healthy diet by improving bone health and reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in adults. One of Greek yogurt’s primary benefits is it delivers higher protein and less sugar than the regular variety. Six ounces of Greek yogurt can deliver as much protein as three ounces of lean meat. As a result, Greek yogurt promotes the sense of fullness with fewer calories than many other protein sources. Check out these ways you can incorporate Greek yogurt into your favorite recipes this holiday!

Healthy Thanksgiving Dessert Recipes

Thanksgiving desserts are often people’s favorite part of the holidays, and rightfully so. Homemade Thanksgiving pies are the ultimate comfort food. What’s not so comforting, however, is the amount of bad fat in most desserts. Here are a couple of healthy takes on some favorite desserts:

Diabetic Friendly Crustless Pumpkin Pie
If you’re living with diabetes, you know that finding a good diabetic-friendly dessert recipe can be a challenge. Try this one out and let us know what you think in the comments below.

New York Style Cheesecake
The ingredient choices here help this to be a better option than a traditional recipe. However, remember, this is still a dessert with calories and fat. Even though it is a better decision than traditional fare, be sure to watch your portions and keep this to an occasional treat.

Chat with Us!

Healthy Holiday Eating ChatJoin Dr. Gina Lundberg, Clinical Director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center, on December 9 at noon for a live web chat on Heart Healthy Holiday Eating. Dr. Lundberg will give advice on how to enjoy the season while maintaining a healthy heart, ingredients to avoid if you’re worried about weight gain and more. You can still enjoy tasty and satisfying holiday fare without blowing a button, or even worse, negatively affecting your heart health. Join us for all the tips!

Pin with Us!

You can find all these recipes and more on Emory Healthcare’s Pinterest page! All recipes are Emory MD-approved and delicious! We also want you to share YOUR recipes with US! Just message or tweet us @emoryhealthcare and we’ll add you to our Healthy Recipes community board!

Dr. Hart to Host Online Chat on Getting Motivated to Exercise

Dr. Chris HartExercise provides numerous benefits—from reducing cardiovascular disease to fighting depression. While we all know we should exercise regularly, the trick is working up the motivation to start exercising. Overcoming couch-potato inertia can be difficult particularly during the dreary winter months and especially after most of us have spent the holidays celebrating with family, friends—and a lot of comfort food.

Join Christopher J. Hart, MD, Chief of Staff at Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Medical Director of Emory Johns Creek’s Atlanta Bariatric Center, on Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014 from noon to 1 p.m. as he provides tips and guidance to help you get moving.

Exercise Motivation Chat Sign Up

 

Whether you are simply working toward a healthier lifestyle in the New Year, or you are trying to lose weight for a surgery, Dr. Hart can address issues and questions such as:

  • I really want to start exercising but I can’t seem to work it into my schedule.
  • What if I don’t like to exercise?
  • I can’t carve out an entire hour to exercise. What are my options?
  • What if I can’t afford a gym membership?
  • I’m exhausted all the time, and just the thought of exercising wears me out. How do I get over that mental hurdle?
  • I’ve tried exercising before, but I can’t stick with it. What can I do to stay motivated?

If you’re looking for a good way to get motivated in the New Year, join Dr. Hart for what’s sure to be a great online chat!

Learning the Risk Factors, Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

Stroke is the number four cause of death in the United States, as well as the leading cause of adult disability. Though strokes do not discriminate against age or race, people who do not practice proper wellness are more susceptible in having one. While striving for optimal health can be a daunting task, the good news is that 80 percent of strokes can be prevented with the right combination of a healthy lifestyle and medical management.

Join Fadi Nahab, MD, stroke medical director at Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown, on Tuesday, April 23rd from noon-1pm to discuss how you can help both prevent and also spot the symptoms of a stroke in yourself or in others. Dr. Nahab also will address why every second counts when seeking help for a stroke.

CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Is There a Difference Between Botox© and Facial Fillers?

Facial Plastic Surgery Web ChatOne of the most frequently asked questions I receive from my patients is, “is there a difference between Botox© and fillers?” This is a very reasonable question since they are both used to treat facial lines and wrinkles, but there is in fact a difference between them.

In general, injectables known as “neuromodulators”or “neurotoxins,” including Botox©, Dysport© and Xeomin©, are used for lines caused by repetitive motion. These lines occur most frequently in the upper region of the face including the forehead, between the eyebrows and around the eyes (“crows feet”). They can also be seen in the area around the lips (“lipstick lines”) or on the sides of the nose (“bunny lines”). When used in small amounts, neuromodulators reduce the activity of muscle contraction, thereby reducing the appearance of lines and softening wrinkles. By reducing muscle contraction, neuromodulators prevent the deepening of lines over time. The effect of these injections usually lasts between 3-4 months.

In comparison to neuromodulators such as Botox©, fillers are used to increase the volume of tissue underneath lines and folds. Usually administered to the lower half of the face, fillers are commonly used on the creases that run from the nose to the mouth (nasolabial folds). They can also be used to enhance cheekbones, lips and the area under the eyes. Fillers are used to treat lines that develop in tissues that are normally at rest, versus those treated by the neuromodulators as a result of overuse. Results typically last between 4-12 months depending on the severity of the crease, the type of filler used and area of injection.

It’s important to understand that in some cases a facial plastic surgeon may recommend a patient receive both an neuromodulator and filler. For instance, if I see a patient with facial creases that are visible at rest but also deepen with facial expressions, I typically recommend the patient receive both. It’s important to talk through your options with your facial plastic surgeon and ask him or her to walk-through their treatment plan with you.

If you have additional questions on neuromodulators, fillers or anything else related to facial plastic surgery, please join me as I host a live web chat on June 28, 2012. There I will answer any questions about facial plastic surgery from skincare advice to surgical procedures.

About Dr. Anita Sethna
Anita Sethna, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery within the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. She holds clinic at the Emory Facial Center located in Perimeter. Dr. Sethna’s professional goals are to provide her patients with the highest level of care for facial reconstructive as well as cosmetic procedures, maintaining natural and subtle results using surgical and non-surgical interventions. She joined Emory Healthcare in 2010.

Related Resources:

Uterine Fibroid Embolization: a Non-Surgical Option for Uterine Fibroids

 

Uterine Fibroid Embolization Web ChatMany women who have uterine fibroids go through their days with no noticeable symptoms. They may even be unaware they have fibroids at all. However, for a small percentage, daily life can be significantly impacted by symptoms.

Uterine fibroids are non-cancerous growths that occur in the wall of the uterus. They may be as small as a pea or as large as a cantaloupe. They can cause a host of disruptive symptoms: unusually heavy or long menstrual periods, pressure on the bladder leading to frequent trips to the bathroom, bloating, pain during sexual intercourse and pain in the pelvis, legs, or lower back. Uterine fibroids are common and affect 20% to 40% of women 20 years or older and occur in half of African American women. So far, doctors have been unable to pinpoint why fibroids are more common in African Americans or why women develop them at all. What we do know is that heredity and obesity are risk factors and that hormone levels play a role.

Traditionally, treatment for women with problematic uterine fibroids has been surgical— hysterectomy or myomectomy (surgical removal of the fibroids after a uterine evaluation from a gynecologist). In fact, unwanted fibroid symptoms trigger approximately 200,000 hysterectomies each year.

For close to 20 years, interventional radiologists, myself included, have used a nonsurgical alternative to treat women who suffer with uterine fibroids. This minimally invasive procedure is called embolization.  The technique itself is not new, but its application to fibroids is.  For more than three decades, physicians have used embolization to treat pelvic bleeding due to other causes (trauma, tumors, surgical complications).  Embolization has proven to be an effective means to shrink uterine fibroids and alleviate the symptoms they cause.

Throughout my years of practice, most women who have come to me seeking information on uterine fibroid embolization have come on their own looking for an alternative to surgery. However, most women who are offered a hysterectomy do not know that there is less invasive solution.

In fact, compared to the surgical options, embolization results in fewer complications, a shorter hospital stay and a far quicker recovery time.  It has an 85% to 92% success rate compared with myomectomy — 10% to 30% of myomectomy patients develop fibroids again. Long term data now shows that about 75% of women who have uterine fibroid embolization report ongoing satisfaction and continuous symptomatic relief for 5-7 years following the procedure.  In fact, most women I treat report a significant improvement in their symptoms at their first post procedure check-up.

An embolization is performed through a small puncture in a groin artery. Dye is injected into the artery to identify which blood vessels supply the uterus and fibroids. The interventional radiologist then guides a wire and catheter into the identified vessels and injects small particles that block the blood supply to the fibroids. The fibroids and the uterus shrink approximately 50-60% in the first year. Heavy periods usually take a few cycles to lessen. The procedure takes approximately an hour followed by a day’s stay in the hospital for intravenous pain medication. Patients can usually resume normal activity after a week.

If you have additional questions about uterine fibroid embolization, please join Roger Williams, DO, and me as we host a free live web chat on the topic of UFE on June 13, 2012 (12:30 p.m. EST). Bring your questions and get ready for a great discussion!

Dr. Gail Peters

About the Author
Gail Peters, M.D. is an Assistant Professor of Radiology at Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown. Dr. Peters’ specialties are in Interventional Radiology, Pediatric Radiology with clinical interests in Fibroid Embolization.

UFE Related Resources:

Comfort Foods: Substitution is the Name of the Game

Mahed Cauliflower Substitute for Potatoes When it comes to favorite comfort foods, mashed potatoes, mac’n cheese, and ice cream tend to top everyone’s list. Their rich, creamy texture tastes great but the calories can add up quickly since they are usually high in fat and carbohydrates. How can you have a favorite comfort food and watch your calories? Let’s talk substitution.

Using mashed potatoes as an example, simply substitute a high fiber vegetable like cauliflower for the potatoes in the recipe. This shaves off calories and carbohydrates while adding more nutrients. Cauliflower is a nutrient powerhouse, loaded with more calcium, fiber, vitamin C, folate, and vitamin K than a comparable amount of white potatoes.

Nutritional Breakdown Before Substitution:

Here is the breakdown for one serving of regular mashed potatoes (with butter and cream) from a popular cooking website.1 (We actually cut the serving size in half since what they listed as a serving was enormous!) Mashed potatoes:  1 serving =  ¾ cup, 400 calories, 35 grams fat, 25 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams fiber.2

Nutritional Breakdown After Substitution:

However, you can substitute steamed cauliflower for the potato and add additional ingredients that boost flavor and cut the fat. Per serving, you save 200 calories, 25 grams of fat, and 10 grams of carbohydrates!

This substitution allows you to keep a favorite comfort food on the menu. Experiment with other recipes, using ingredients that cut calories and boost flavor. Check out this website for ways to reduce calories while still enjoying your favorite foods3. Unfortunately, cauliflower ice cream just doesn’t sound that good.

Mashed Cauliflower Recipe (Serves 3)

1 medium head cauliflower
½ cup diced onions
1 Tablespoon cooking oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
¼ to ½ cup 2% milk (any type of low-fat, non-dairy milk would work too)
Salt and pepper to taste

Cut stem and leaves off cauliflower. Wash and drain trimmed cauliflower. Cut into large chunks and boil or steam on stovetop for approximately 8 minutes, or until cauliflower is soft. While cauliflower is steaming, sauté onions in oil in small skillet over medium heat until transparent. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute more. Remove from heat. Add steamed cauliflower, onion mixture, butter and ¼ cup milk to food processor or blender. Process on high until all ingredients are combined and smooth. Can add additional milk if desire thinner consistency. Season as desired. Serve immediately or cool in refrigerator, then reheat in microwave.

Nutrition per serving: Portion size: ¾ cup, 200 calories, 10 grams fat, 15 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams fiber

1FoodNetwork.com Mashed Potato Recipe
2USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory