Posts Tagged ‘stroke awareness’

Takeaways from Dr. Belagaje’s Stroke Recovery Live Chat

Stroke Recovery ChatThank you to everyone who joined us on May 28, for our live chat on Stroke Recovery. There were some great questions and we hope you found stroke neurologist, Dr. Samir Belagaje’s discussion informative. If you missed the chat, feel free to review the full chat transcript.

There was such a good response, we didn’t have time to address all of the questions you submitted during the chat, so we will answer those below:

Question: What other things can be done besides going to a recovery center?

Samir BelagajeDr. Belagaje: Certainly one can develop a home exercise/rehabilitation plan and continue to work on improving their stroke related deficits in that fashion. However, I strongly recommend that stroke recovery be completed under the guidance of a health care expert in that area or going to a stroke recovery center. They can look at medications which may be adversely affecting the recovery process, start new ones, screen/treat for depression, and provide opportunities to participate in clinical trials which would allow one to get access to latest technology and developments.

Question: Does the brain actually recover from a stroke or are you just ‘retraining’ different parts of your brain? How is it recovering?

Samir BelagajeDr. Belagaje: Great question! People recover from stroke in 3 major ways:

  • Adaptation– In this method, people just “learn to live with deficits” and find ways to adapt or get along with them. Examples would be the use of prisms in eye glasses for post-stroke visual problems or using a cane/walker to help with walking. Another example would be for a person to learn to feed themselves with their opposite hand
  • Regeneration– this involves growing new brain cells and them getting to the area of stroke and repairing that area. This is the way that stem cells and other biotherapeutics may help. It is an exciting area for stroke recovery research.
  • Rewiring– this is probably the major way of stroke recovery in the brain and the mechanism most therapy is geared towards. It is also the way that you are alluding to in your question when you talk about “retraining different parts of the brain”. Most therapy is geared towards getting those undamaged parts of the brain to rewire and take over the function of the damaged portions

Question: My dad lives in the UK and suffered a stroke. What can he do to help himself?

Samir BelagajeDr. Belagaje: Sorry to hear about your father. It really depends how long ago his stroke was and what kind of deficits he has post-stroke. In general terms, he should continue to stay as active as possible and continue to work on his deficits with therapy/rehab team. I would also encourage family and close friends to monitor for post-stroke depression symptoms and alert his health care providers if they notice depression symptoms.

Question: How do you regain normal vision after stroke?

Samir BelagajeDr. Belagaje: Admittedly, post-stroke vision deficits are challenging as we don’t have as good and effective and proven visual rehab therapy/techniques compared to some other deficits. If her stroke is greater than 6 months, I would recommend seeing a neuro-ophthalmologist for possible prisms in the glasses (this would be an adaptation technique I mentioned in an answer to another question). In addition, working with an occupational therapist (OT) may also help to improve visual field deficits and develop compensation techniques.

 

 

 

Stroke Awareness Month Events at Emory Healthcare

Stroke EventsAccording to the American Heart Association, stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. In recognition of May as National Stroke Awareness Month, Emory Healthcare encourages you to learn the signs, symptoms and risk factors for stroke. Mark your calendar for the following events:

Community Stroke Fair

When: Wednesday, May 13, 2015; 11:00 am to 2:00 pm
Where: Emory University Hospital Midtown Medical Office Tower Lobby
Why:

  • Learn the signs and symptoms of stroke
  • Free blood pressure screening
  • Ask a neurologist about stroke care
  • Hear about stroke rehabilitation programs
  • Speak to a pharmacist
  • Get your BMI checked
  • Free gift bags

5K Scrub Run and Community Health Festival

When: Saturday, May 16, 2015; 8 am to 11am
Where: Emory Johns Creek Hospital parking lot
Why:

  • Learn the signs and symptoms of stroke
  • Free glucose and cholesterol
  • Free blood pressure screening
  • Get your BMI checked

Stroke Awareness Fair

When: Tuesday, May 19, 2015; 10 am to 2 pm
Where: Emory Clinic Motor Lobby between buildings A and B
Why:

  • Learn the signs and symptoms of stroke
  • Understand how to manage blood pressure, exercise properly and maintain a healthy diet
  • Talk with experts about stroke prevention and response for suspected stroke

Stroke LIVE Chat

stroke-recovery-chat

 When: Thursday, May 28, 2015; 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
 Where: Online
 Why:

  •  Learn about stroke recovery and rehabilitation from Dr. Samir Belagaje, stroke neurologist at Emory  University and Director of Stroke Rehabilitation at the Marcus Stroke Center. Dr. Belaje will answer  questions during a LIVE interactive chat.

Chat Sign Up

Stroke is an emergency. If you or someone around you is experiencing signs or symptoms of stroke, CALL 911 immediately.

Emory Honors World Stroke Day

World Stroke DayOn this Wednesday, October 29, people all across the globe will celebrate World Stroke Day. This day was established in 2006 to raise public awareness of the warning signs of stroke. Our teams at Emory Healthcare work daily in the fight to treat and end stroke. Last year, Emory Healthcare treated over 1800 stroke patients at our hospitals, and approximately 300 patients received intensive rehabilitation care post-stroke at the Emory Rehabilitation Hospital – a total surpassing 2,000 patients.

We are passionate about stroke prevention – especially since 80% of strokes are preventable – and have created outreach teams that screen and educate members of the community throughout metro-Atlanta. To date in 2014, our teams have reached over 1,000 community members and counting.

Recognizing stroke early and getting immediate medical attention is key in reversing potential damage to your brain. Remember to ACT F.A.S.T. if you suspect that you or someone else around you is experiencing a stroke. If you notice the following signs, you should call 911 immediately:

F: Facial droop; uneven smile

A: Arm numbness or weakness

S: Slurred speech, difficulty speaking or understanding

T: Time to call 911 and get to the nearest stroke center immediately

In line with World Stroke Day, Georgia Governor Nathan Deal recently signed a proclamation declaring October 29th Georgia Stroke Awareness Day, in which he encourages all citizens to seek education on adequate prevention and recognition of signs/symptoms of stroke.

As we promote stroke prevention and timely recognition in our communities, we remind you that you have the power to end stroke – and Emory is here to help. We invite you to visit our website for further information on stroke prevention, recognition and treatment.

Lastly, we would like to thank all the teams playing a role in our efforts, and share with them this campaign as we continue our fight to end stroke.

Related Resources

Takeaways from Dr. Nahab’s “Stroke Awareness Month” Live Chat

StrokeThank you to everyone who joined us for the live web chat hosted by Emory Stroke Center Medical Director, Dr. Fadi Nahab. Dr. Nahab discussed the signs and symptoms of stroke, as well as treatments, recovery options and prevention.

Get more info and see more of Dr. Nahab’s answers by checking out the chat transcript!

Below are just a few of the questions and answers from the Emory Stroke Center’s live chat:

Question: Are there any preventative measures that you recommend to the general population?

Fadi Nahab, MDDr. Nahab: Definitely! First, if you’re actively smoking, it’s very important to stop as soon as possible. Secondly, dietary factors play a major role in our risk of having a stroke or heart attack. Low salt, limited fried food, high dietary fiber, and nuts can have an important effect. Fish that are high in omega-3 fats, such as salmon or tuna, should be consumed at least two times a week because of its beneficial effects. Limiting sugary beverages (specifically soda and sweet tea) also helps reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. A third factor is increasing moderate exercise/activity to at least 20 min. daily. 20 min. represents the smallest amount we should be doing for heart attack and stroke prevention. The last four factors include control of blood pressure to a target of less than 120/80, control of cholesterol to a target of total cholesterol less than 200 mg/dl, blood glucose to a target fasting level less than 100, and a target weight using body mass index (BMI) less than 25. Body mass index can be calculated as your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared. A recent study showed that each additional factor you achieve results in an 8% lower risk of stroke.

Question: Do you have advice for preventing hemorrhagic stroke recurrence?

Fadi Nahab, MDDr. Nahab: The best way to prevent a hemorrhagic stroke is to monitor your blood pressure and make sure it’s below 130/80. I often encourage patients to check their blood pressure twice a day, in the morning and evening before meals, sitting down with your arm rested on a table. It’s an important investment to have a blood pressure machine. Without checking your blood pressure, you can miss detecting high blood pressure until it’s too late. For patients who have a hemorrhagic stroke related to a blood vessel problem in the brain, there are very good treatments for reducing the risk of a recurring hemorrhagic stroke. At Emory, we are one of the largest volume hemorrhagic stroke centers in the country and use cutting-edge technology to treat aneurysms and other blood vessel abnormalities.

If you missed this informative chat with Dr. Nahab, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. Be sure to visit our website for more information about stroke prevention and treatment at the Emory Stroke Center. If you have any questions for the doctor, do not hesitate to leave a comment in our comments area below.

What is a Mini Stroke?

stroke-fbOn average, one person in the United States dies from a stroke every 4 minutes, and strokes account for 1 out of every 19 deaths each year, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Though not everyone gets a warning before experiencing a stroke, some people experience what is called a transient ischemic attack (TIA) – also known as a mini-stroke. The American Stroke Association characterizes it as a warning sign of a stroke, and it should be taken very seriously.

TIA is caused by a blood clot in an artery in or leading to the brain, however the blockage it creates is only temporary (transient). Symptoms caused by a TIA may last up to 24 hours, but usually resolve within 1 to 2 hours. Fortunately, it usually does not cause permanent damage to the brain. Though most strokes are not preceded by a mini-stroke, about a third of the people who suffer TIA experience a stroke within a year’s time. It is suggested that those who experience a transient ischemic attack to treat it as a warning sign, and should act to keep a permanent, more dangerous stroke from occurring.

Though clots associated with TIA dissolve quickly, there is no way of knowing how long it could take. Whenever you have any stroke symptoms, dial 911 immediately so you can get evaluated in an emergency room. Time is of the essence, or put another way, time equals brain.

F.A.S.T. is an easy way to remember the sudden signs and symptoms of a stroke:

Face drooping
Arm weakness
Speech difficulty
Time to call 911

Additional signs of a stroke can include:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arms or legs, especially on one side of the body
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden severe headache with no known causes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness or lack of balance and coordination

If you experience TIA after having a stroke, go to the emergency room immediately, since it could mean that something in your treatment plan is not working as it should.

Related Resources

May is National Stroke Awareness Month!

Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke, according to the National Stroke Association.

In recognition of May as National Stroke Awareness Month, Emory Healthcare encourages you to learn the signs, symptoms and risk factors for stroke. Mark your calendar for the following events:


Stroke Awareness

Go Red for Women Event at Emory University Hospital Midtown

  • Where:

Emory University Hospital Midtown
Medical Office Tower Lobby
550 Peachtree Street, NE
Atlanta, Georgia

  • When: Friday, May 9 ; 7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • What: Come out and enjoy this fun, educational event, where you can meet the Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians and staff, learn how to prevent heart disease and find out if you are at risk for heart disease. The event will also feature nutrition consultations, body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure screenings for attendees.

Also, join us at 12 p.m. in the Glenn Auditorium for a short educational talk on how to prevent heart disease by Emory Women’s Heart Center cardiologist Alexis Cutchins, MD.
 
Nurses who attend the talk will be offered 0.5 Contact Hours. Refreshments will be served.


Stroke Awareness Fair at Emory University Hospital

  • Where:

Emory University Hospital
1364 Clifton Road, NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30322
E Wing Auditorium and Classroom Lobby, 2nd Floor

  • When: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 ; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • What: Come out to learn signs and symptoms of stroke, understand how to manage blood pressure, exercise properly and maintain a healthy diet. You can talk to experts about stroke prevention and response for suspected stroke. Also, plan to participate in two community stroke lectures, beginning at 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
  • Who: Emory employees, patients, families and you!

Stroke Awareness Fair at Emory University Hospital Midtown

  • Where:

Emory University Hospital Midtown
Medical Office Tower Lobby
550 Peachtree Street, NE
Atlanta, Georgia

  • When: Thursday, May 15, 2014; 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • What: Join us to learn the signs and symptoms of stroke, ask a neurologist about stroke care, speak to a pharmacist, get your BMI checked and learn about stroke rehabilitation programs.
  • Who: Emory employees, patients, families and you!

Stroke Awareness at Emory Johns Creek Hospital

  • Where:

Emory Johns Creek Hospital
6325 Hospital Parkway
Johns Creek, GA

Related Resources:

How Much Do You Really Know About Strokes?

Stroke Awareness ChatMay is National Stroke Awareness Month, making it the perfect time to brush up on your knowledge of the risks, signs and symptoms associated with stroke. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, someone in the United States dies of a stroke every four minutes. Fortunately, as a Comprehensive Stroke Center, Emory University Hospital is helping lead the way in research efforts that focus on preventing the risk factors that can lead to stroke, as well as new models of stroke care. Emory vascular neurologist Fadi Nahab, MD will be on hand to answer questions such as:

  • What puts someone at risk for a stroke?
  • How can I prevent stroke?
  • How are strokes treated?
  • Why is Emory a great choice for stroke care?

Mitral Valve Disease Chat

Do you know how to recognize stroke symptoms and when to “Act F.A.S.T.“?

Stroke Awareness Month Events at Emory Healthcare

Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke, according to the National Stroke Association. In recognition of May as National Stroke Awareness Month, Emory Healthcare encourages you to learn the signs, symptoms and risk factors for stroke. Mark your calendar for the following events:

Community Stroke Fair
When: Wednesday, May 15, 2013; 11:00 am to 2 pm
Where: Emory University Hospital Midtown Medical Office Tower Lobby
Why:
• Learn the signs and symptoms of stroke
• Ask a neurologist about stroke care
• Hear about stroke rehabilitation programs
• Speak to a pharmacist
• Get your BMI checked
• Hear about stroke rehabilitation programs

Stroke Awareness Fair
When:Friday, May 30 31, 2013; 10 am to 2 pm
Where: Emory University Hospital
Auditorium, Classrooms B and C
Join us to:
• Learn the signs and symptoms of stroke
• Understand how to manage blood pressure, exercise properly and maintain a healthy diet
• Participate in a community stroke lecture at noon

Stroke is an emergency. If you or someone around you is experiencing signs or symptoms of stroke, CALL 911 immediately.

Related Resources

Become Aware of the Risks, Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

Dr. Fadi Nahab, stroke director at Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown, recently conducted a chat to address the signs and symptoms of stroke, as well as what you can do to decrease your risk. Dr. Nahab’s timing couldn’t be better. May is National Stroke Awareness Month – the perfect time to brush up on your knowledge of stroke and commit to reducing your own risk factors for stroke.

Stroke remains the country’s leading cause of disability. Fortunately, Emory Healthcare is committed to providing excellent stroke care throughout North Georgia. In fact, Emory University Hospital recently was named Atlanta’s first certified Comprehensive Stroke Center, while Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Saint Joseph’s Hospital all are certified Primary Stroke Centers.

Learning the Risk Factors, Signs and Symptoms of Stroke

Stroke is the number four cause of death in the United States, as well as the leading cause of adult disability. Though strokes do not discriminate against age or race, people who do not practice proper wellness are more susceptible in having one. While striving for optimal health can be a daunting task, the good news is that 80 percent of strokes can be prevented with the right combination of a healthy lifestyle and medical management.

Join Fadi Nahab, MD, stroke medical director at Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown, on Tuesday, April 23rd from noon-1pm to discuss how you can help both prevent and also spot the symptoms of a stroke in yourself or in others. Dr. Nahab also will address why every second counts when seeking help for a stroke.

CHAT TRANSCRIPT