Posts Tagged ‘peachtree road race’

Top 10 Tips for a Great AJC Peachtree Road Race!

Peachtree Road RaceAre you ready to have some fun at the AJC Peachtree Road Race on Wednesday, July 4th?  Your training is done so now trust yourself that you have put in the hard work to have a successful race!  Here are some last minute tips to ensure that you are in top form on Wednesday!

  1. Hydrate yourself frequently before, during and after running in order to loosen muscles.  Start hydrating a few days before the race making sure to drink fluids with electrolytes as well as water. During the race drink to thirst, you do not need to stop at every water station unless you feel thirsty.
  2. Get your rest!  Start sleeping a little more each night before the race to ensure you are feeling rested on race day.  Typically during training you should sleep one extra minute each night for every mile you run. For example, if you run 30 miles a week, sleep 30 additional minutes each night.
  3. On race day, don’t forget your sunscreen and wear a hat!  The course is not heavily shaded so you could get sun-burned if you don’t properly protect your skin!
  4. Use a product similar to Body Glide on feet and other areas that may chafe to avoid blisters and sore spots after the race!
  5. If possible, wear clothing that wicks away moisture like “Dry Fit”.  This will help you stay cooler during the run.
  6. Warm up with some light jogging or some light stretching before your race to loosen tight muscles. Do not start any new stretches on race day though.  Stick to what you have done during your training.
  7. If the conditions are very hot, slow your pace down a little to ensure you do not develop heat stroke, heat cramps or heat exhaustion.
  8. When you think you want to quit,  think about the joy you will feel while crossing the finish line and celebrating with friends and family and getting that coveted T-shirt!
  9. Pay attention to your body! If you experience pain during or after the race and it does not go away, something may be wrong. Schedule an appointment with an Emory Sports Medicine physician.
  10. If you feel extremely abnormal signs/symptoms during  the race, ask a volunteer to help you to the nearest medical tent for help.  We want to make sure all participants stay healthy to participate again next year!

Most of all though – have fun!  Enjoy the outside and celebrate the fact that you are able to compete in this great American tradition!

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the AJC Peachtree Road Race.

Emory Healthcare is the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia and includes Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Wesley Woods Center, Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Adventist Hospital, The Emory Clinic, Emory Specialty Associates, and the Emory Clinically Integrated Network.

Come visit us at the AJC Peachtree Road Race expo in booth 527 to get your blood pressure checked and learn more about how Emory Healthcare can help you and your family stay healthy!

About Emory Sports Medicine

The Emory Sports Medicine Center is a leader in advanced treatments for patients with orthopedic and sports-related injuries. From surgical sports medicine expertise to innovative therapy and athletic injury rehabilitation, our sports medicine physicians and specialists provide the most comprehensive treatment for athletic injuries in Atlanta and the state of Georgia.

Emory sports medicine patients range from professional athletes to those who enjoy active lifestyles and want the best possible outcomes and recovery from sports injuries. Emory doctors are the sports medicine team physicians for the Atlanta Falcons and Georgia Tech and provide services for many additional professional, collegiate and recreational teams. Appointments for surgical second opinions or acute sports injuries are available within 48 hours.

About Dr. Jeff Webb

Dr. Jeffrey WebbJeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team.  He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools, the Atlanta Dekalb International Olympic Training Center, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Perimeter College, and many other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.  Dr Webb is an avid runner and has completed 16 Peachtree Road Races.

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What Should I Eat Before I Run?

Tips for Your Pre-AJC Peachtree Road Race Nutrition 

Nutrition is a key aspect of running.  If you eat too little, you may feel sluggish.  If you eat too much, you could feel bloated and heavy during the race.  And if you eat the wrong foods, you could end up spending a lot of time in the restroom.

What Should I Eat the Night Before the Race?

Be careful of the “carbo loading” ritual of many runners.  Eating too many carbs the night before a race can leave you feeling sluggish on race day.  Eat foods that are easily digestible such as lean proteins, fruits, or foods with Omega -3’s.  Also, make sure to hydrate with water and electrolytes.  Electrolytes can be found in drinks like PowerAde or Gatorade.  Drinking too much water could be harmful, so try to include some electrolytes into your pre-race routine.

Race Day Meal Planning

Try to get up early on the morning of the race and eat your pre-race meal.  Eating at least 1 – 2 hours before your race is recommended but if you have a weak stomach, you may need to eat as much as 4 hours before the race.  If you eat 3 – 4 hours out, make sure to consume more calories than you would if you eat only 1 hour before the race.

What Should I Eat Before I Run?

What Food to Eat Before a Running Race

At least 80% of the calories you eat before your race should come from carbohydrates.  This could be in the form of a bagel, oatmeal, English muffin, pancakes (go easy on the syrup) or energy bars.

Avoid the following foods before a running race:

  • Foods with high fiber content
  • Foods high in fat
  • Vegetables such as onions and cabbage which may leave you gassy and bloated
  • Foods high in protein because it takes your body longer to digest. Carbs can be digested quicker and used for energy needed to run your race!

I highly encourage you to test out different foods.  The best time for you to eat is during your morning training runs to simulate race day conditions and determine what works best for you.  So start practicing now!  Race day is quickly approaching!

Good luck and have fun out there!


Peachtree Road RaceEmory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the AJC Peachtree Road Race.

Emory Healthcare is the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia and includes Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Wesley Woods Center, Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Adventist Hospital, The Emory Clinic, Emory Specialty Associates, and the Emory Clinically Integrated Network.

Come visit us at the AJC Peachtree Road Race expo in booth 527 to get your blood pressure checked and learn more about how Emory Healthcare can help you and your family stay healthy!


About Dr. Mason
Dr. Amadeus MasonDr. Mason is an assistant professor in the Orthopaedics and Family Medicine departments at Emory University. He is board certified in Sports Medicine with a special interest in track and field, running injuries and exercise testing. He has been trained in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound, and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injection. Dr. Mason is Team Physician for USA Track and Field and the National Scholastic Athletics Foundation Track and Field and Cross Country meets, Tucker High School, and Georgia Tech Track and Field.

Dr. Mason is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, the America Road Racing Medical Society, and the USA Track and Field Sports Medicine and Science Committee. He has been invited to be a resident physician at the US Olympic Training Center, a Sports Medicine consultant in his homeland of Jamaica and the Chief Medical Officer at multiple USA Track and Field international competitions. He has also been a frequently featured guest CNN’s fit nation commenting on a wide variety of topics related to athletics and running injuries. Dr. Mason attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team.

Dr. Mason is an active member of the Atlanta running community. He attended Princeton University and was Captain of the track team. His other sports interests include soccer, college basketball and football, and the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA). A Decatur resident, he is married with three children.

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Is it Possible to Overtrain for a Running Race?

2013 Peachtree Road RaceYes, it is possible to overtrain your body while training for a running race! I know from personal experience because I am an avid runner and have run the Peachtree Road Race 16 times. Overtraining can occur when runners stress their bodies beyond what their bodies can handle. This can occur when a runner trains too fast or too hard without sufficient rest and care of minor injuries and aches and pains.

Some symptoms of overtraining include:

  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Weight loss
  • Appetite loss
  • Chronic muscle soreness
  • Elevated heart rate when waking up
  • Depression
  • Decreased performance
  • Irritability
  • Apathy
  • Decreased enthusiasm for running

The most common overtraining injury we see in our clinic is a stress fracture. When the bone is under repetitive stress day after day it can eventually crack. Stress fractures are characterized by localized pain and swelling over a bone, especially in the foot or shin. It generally gets worse the further you run and progressively more painful over time. If you experience these symptoms during your training you should see a sports medicine specialist for evaluation.

Runners can overcome overtraining by taking a few “rest days” when you feel your body is telling you to rest. Many runners do not want to take time to rest but you will find your performance will actually improve by letting your body rest. Also, if you do not want to fully rest, try cross training. You can go for a swim, try yoga or pilates to improve your endurance, core strength and flexibility.

Listen to your body and if you experience many of the symptoms above, instead of pushing harder, try mixing up your running routine and adding rest. The body likes variety. We are not meant to do the same activity for multiple hours day after day after day. You may surprise yourself and run faster because you let your body recover!

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the AJC Peachtree Road Race.

Emory Healthcare is the largest, most comprehensive health system in Georgia and includes Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, Wesley Woods Center, Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Adventist Hospital, The Emory Clinic, Emory Specialty Associates, and the Emory Clinically Integrated Network.

Come visit us at the AJC Peachtree Road Race expo in booth 527 to get your blood pressure checked and learn more about how Emory Healthcare can help you and your family stay healthy!

About Dr. Jeff Webb

Dr. Jeffrey Webb

Jeff Webb, MD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedics at Emory Orthopaedics & Spine Center. Dr. Webb started practicing at Emory in 2008 after completing a Fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama. He is board certified in pediatrics and sports medicine. He is a team physician for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, and serves as the primary care sports medicine and concussion specialist for the team.  He is also a consulting team physician for several Atlanta area high schools, the Atlanta Dekalb International Olympic Training Center, Emory University, Oglethorpe University, Georgia Perimeter College, and many other club sports.

Dr. Webb sees patients of all ages and abilities with musculoskeletal problems, but specializes in the care of pediatric and adolescent patients. He works hard to get players “back in the game” safely and as quickly as possible. He is currently active in the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics professional societies and has given multiple lectures at national conferences as well as contributed to sports medicine text books.  Dr Webb is an avid runner and has completed 16 Peachtree Road Races.

Related Resources: