Posts Tagged ‘news’

A VERY Special Delivery at Emory University Hospital Midtown

Dana Tottenham in front of Emory University Hospital Midtown

Dana Tottenham, with new born son, Adlai, in front of Emory University Hospital Midtown

Two days ago, new mother-to-be Dana Tottenham and her friend Sherry Ebrahimi attended Emory’s Founders Day Dinner together. “It’s our annual ritual. We always go as each other’s ‘date,’ and I joked that I had to make it to 37 weeks pregnant to not miss the dinner this year! (My 1st child was premature, so I was at risk for pre-term delivery again).”

Dana and Sherry enjoyed the dinner, and yesterday, the two attended the My Emory celebration on the campus quad, where Sherry brought Dana a hot chocolate and everything was business as usual, until suddenly, Dana went into labor.

Dana asked co-workers and friends Sherry and Elizabeth Manieri to drive her to Emory University Midtown Hospital (EUHM). A few frantic phone calls were made as Sherry drove so Dana’s husband was aware she had gone into labor and would meet her at the hospital.

Nature intervened. Midway through the short drive to EUHM, Dana’s labor escalated. The ladies pulled into the hospital’s valet parking area and Elizabeth quickly raced to get the doctor and Dana’s husband. In that short time, Dana and Sherry had delivered Dana’s newborn baby—a boy, weighing 6 lbs 0.7 oz—right in the car.

“I never doubted that we would make it to the hospital in time. Of all the people in the universe, Sherry was the best person to be my charge nurse–doula-driver-and midwife on that fateful day. I did have to fight through every contraction to not push, because I felt the baby’s head crowning as we were on Ponce de Leon. As soon as we pulled up to the hospital curb, I simply surrendered to the moment, and Adlai was born,” recalls Dana.

Sherry recalls the fairly chaotic moment with an overwhelming sense of peaceful joy, “It was one of the most amazing experience of my life! When I saw the baby coming, I grabbed him and held him while Dana reached down and untangled the umbilical cord. When I passed him to her it was the most beautiful newborn- mom moment—my eyes got teary and I exited the car so they could have a bonding moment. Surprisingly, I was calm—I think because we were parked in front of the hospital- so I knew help was on the way. Dana was calm the whole time…an absolute rock star through it all.”

Minutes later, medical help and Dana’s husband, Eric, arrived to celebrate the birth of Adlai Tottenham Chang. Dana says of her baby’s grand entrance, “Adlai Tottenham Chang (boy), was born February 5, 2013 @ 12:14 pm in a Toyota Camry, right outside Emory University Midtown Hospital. He’s 6 lbs 0.7 oz., 46 cm long.” Adlai, whose name means “God is Just,” joins his big brother Lyndon in the family.

“You may have heard of another Adlai (Stevenson)- US Ambassador to the United Nations during Kennedy and LBJ’s administration (Brother Lyndon’s namesake). We think our little guy has global ambitions. He was born in a car, so he’s ready to hit the road and meet the world!” Dana exclaims.

From the whole Emory Healthcare family, welcome to the world, Adlai.

Welcoming the Paces Plastic Surgery Center to the Emory Healthcare Family!

Paces Plastic Surgery Center Emory PartnershipAt Emory Healthcare we pride ourselves in developing and maintaining outstanding relationships with talented physicians and associates across Atlanta and the state of Georgia. As we continue our efforts to build partnerships to improve patient care, we’re happy to announce the acquisition of the plastic surgery practice of Roderick Hester, MD and Foad Nahai, MD, along with the Paces Plastic Surgery Center, located in Buckhead.

Both Dr. Hester and Dr. Nahai are associate professors of surgery of the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Emory University’s School of Medicine.

“Emory Healthcare has a robust plastics and aesthetics practice that focuses primarily on reconstructive surgery,” says Donald Brunn, president and chief operating officer of The Emory Clinic. “This new endeavor will expand the scope of Emory’s clinical practice and will enable patients to receive a full range of coordinated, integrated aesthetics care and services under one comprehensive program and under one roof.”

Emory’s highly trained plastic surgeons provide a variety of surgical services to the Atlanta community, including breast reconstruction; ocular-plastics and ophthalmology; facial plastics and otolaryngology (including head and neck reconstruction) and hand and upper extremity reconstruction.

Our partnership with Dr Hester and Dr. Nahai will be finalized in Spring 2013, at which time the name of the Paces Plastic Surgery Center will change to Emory Aesthetics Center, and the practice will become part of The Emory Clinic’s Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The staff and physicians will continue to meet the highest quality standards and work from one electronic medical record and patient portal system to ensure seamless communications between patients and their physicians

“We look forward to this collaboration as we deliver outstanding services to our patients under the Emory brand,” says Hester. Hester and Nahai are considered by peers to be among the best of the nation’s aesthetic plastic surgeons.

“The benefits of this partnership include helping the center to grow and expand, while offering a wide range of services to patients by skilled health care providers,” Nahai explains.

About the Practice:
Dr. Roderick Hester founded what was then called Paces Plastic Surgery and Recovery Center in 1993. It remains one of the nation’s most comprehensive centers for the care of plastic surgery patients and features state-of-the-art clinical areas, operating rooms and over night recovery suites. The doctors at the Paces Plastic Surgery Center also offer an array of nonsurgical support and treatment services including CoolSculpting™, photofacials, hydrafacials, laser hair removal, facials, chemical peels and more.

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Expanding Access to Top-Notch Health Care in Georgia Communities

Emory Healthcare Atlanta GeorgiaEvery day inside and outside of Emory facility walls our staff and care team members make it their priority to live our mission to serve humanity by improving health. That mission is carried out in obvious ways through the direct partnership between our patients and care team, but also in less obvious ways, by improving our community’s access to top quality patient-centered health care.

In late 2011, we improved access to everyday health care services by partnering with the CVS MinuteClinic to provide health care at 31 locations across the metro Atlanta area without an appointment. As we brought in the New Year, we welcomed the newest member of the Emory Healthcare family, Saint Joseph’s Hospital. Partnering with Saint Joseph’s means two of Atlanta’s leading health care organizations are now working in collaboration to bring an unparalleled level of health care and access to our Atlanta and Georgia communities.

Because the health care needs of our communities are constantly growing, we’ve taken another step to broaden access to the unparalleled level of care provided to the Emory Healthcare community. We have established an agreement to enter into negotiations for Emory to manage Southern Regional Health System that will integrate the Riverdale, Georgia health care network into our own.

These talks come at quite a momentous time for the Emory Healthcare community. While we work to improve access to top-notch health care in Georgia through a partnership with Southern Regional, we also move towards a relationship that will establish the facility as a hospital partner in Emory’s Clinically Integrated Network serving the Southern Crescent area.

The partnership between Southern Regional Health System and Emory Healthcare is an intuitive one, according to Southern Regional’s CEO, Jim Crissey, due to Emory Healthcare’s commitment to high quality care, its strong local presence, proven financial strength and solid reputation in the community.
“Our board is confident that Emory’s mission aligns closely with our own and our shared values will help us to form a successful partnership,” said CEO Crissey.  “Most importantly, a partnership with Emory Healthcare will preserve access to high quality care for the communities we serve,” he said.

We will be sure to keep you updated as discussions with Southern Regional progress here on our blog. If you have comments or feedback on this blog, please leave them for us and our readers in the comments below!

 

Emory is Expanding!

Emory Facility MovesYou may be surprised to see some new construction at The Emory Clinic (TEC).  Construction began on Friday, April 27, 2012, to improve patient access to Buildings A, B and the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University (Building C) in anticipation of construction of the planned Emory University Hospital bed tower.  The project, which will mostly affect the valet area next to Buildings A and Winship, will add lanes to make valet parking easier and faster and improve self-parking by creating an elevated, “conditioned” (heated and cooled) bridge from the main Hospital/Clinic parking deck to TEC  Buildings A and B, as well as leading to the hospital. Pedestrians will no longer have to compete with cars that are trying to enter the valet area in front of Building A.

If you are a patient and have a clinic appointment in TEC  Buildings A or B, please give yourself a few extra minutes to get to your appointment as pedestrian traffic will be slightly rerouted during the construction period.  Please continue to park in the main Hospital/Clinic parking deck.  If you have a hard time walking, we encourage you to take advantage of the valet parking options still open and available next to Building A.

If you are visiting Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, please consider using the Uppergate valet parking area to avoid the traffic.

Visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/expansion for the latest exciting news on the expansion of Emory Healthcare.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause but know you will be thrilled when the project is completed.

New Year, New Family – Saint Joseph’s Hospital Joins the Emory Healthcare Community

Emory Healthcare Saint Joseph's Hospital partnershipAs we bring in the New Year, we’re excited about all the new things on the horizon for Emory Healthcare and the many communities with whom we collaborate to provide high quality health care. We recently, for example, announced on our blog that we have partnered with the CVS MinuteClinic to provide health care at 31 locations across the metro Atlanta area without an appointment. That was very cool news for our community. Today though, we take great joy in being able to bring in the New Year with a huge announcement, and one that our community will truly benefit from in a major way– Emory Healthcare has now joined forces with Saint Joseph’s Hospital.

What does this mean for you? It means that two of Atlanta’s leading health care organizations are now working in collaboration to bring an unparalleled level of health care and access to our Atlanta and Georgia communities.

You may have heard us say before that we believe collaboration is truly the best medicine. Whether this means collaboration between patients and families to make informed decisions about their care with their care team members, or between organizations to improve the quality and access to care provided, we all benefit from collaborative communication and action. Our partnership with Saint Joseph’s Hospital will allow us to take collaboration around Atlanta health care to the next level.

The expertise in education and academic research that serves as the backbone of the technology and level of patient- and family-centered care provided at Emory Healthcare is mirrored by the level of excellence in local community health care we’ve seen from Saint Joseph’s from the very beginning.

We are so pleased to be able to kick off the New Year by bringing such a meaningful partnership to our community. Working with Saint Joseph’s Hospital means our patients and families will have even more access to the very best patient- and family-centered health care in Atlanta being driven by the leading academic research taking place at Emory. We hope you’re as excited about this news as we are! We’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback in the comments below. And if you’re interested in learning more, check out the resources below, including a blog post from the Saint Joseph’s team on what our partnership means to them. Happy New Year, everyone!

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So Many Hospital Rankings, So Little Time – What Should You Look for as a Patient?

Understanding Hospital RankingsWhen you’re trying to price a car, you probably go to the Kelley Blue Book. When you’re looking for a go-to restaurant rating system, you probably choose Yelp or Zagat. When you’re looking for a cancer treatment center, you probably make sure it is designated by the National Cancer Institute. So, when you choose a doctor, or a clinic, or a hospital, what resources do you have to help you make that decision? Aside from the input of your trusted friends and family members, or checking out a health care system’s website, there are many organizations that seek to help patients make decisions about where they seek their care. Some of these organizations rank hospitals with hard data, i.e. – metrics on quality levels and patient outcomes, or by program survival rates. Others seek to measure quality as it relates to consumer or marketplace perception, and some even use fee-based systems, excluding hospitals who don’t pay to participate.

So if you want to make sure you can trust your health care team, you probably also want to make sure that the ranking system you employ to choose them is also trustworthy. Here are 3 things to look for when you choose what hospital rankings you rely on to choose your care provider:

Hard & Tangible Data

Whatever ranking system you choose, make sure that it uses reliable, unbiased data. As an example, some hospital rankings system includes data such as mortality rates, but be careful here. Mortality rates should be adjusted to take into account how sick patients were when they arrived at the facility; otherwise, the data is misleading. Make sure the ranking system you choose is straightforward in its disclosure of how ranking data is collected and used.

Validation from Independent & Credible Industry Associations

Just as there is a large volume of rankings out there, so too is there a large volume of established and reliable accrediting and governing organizations in the health care space. Ranging from large governmental organizations such as the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association (AMA) and the reliable publications they produce, i.e. – Journal of the American Medical Association, to nonprofits such as the American Cancer Society, there are organizations out there you can trust to give you the honest scoop on what you should look for in your care team and what ranking systems do a good job of helping you find them.

Collaboration in Rankings

If it was up to the organizations being ranked to choose their rankings, every business would be #1. It’s important when you choose a hospital ranking system to rely on that you also know who was involved in the process. In general, rankings that incorporate input from consumers, hospitals, physicians, and accrediting organizations are the most reliable. Look for rankings that are tangible and transparent in their language about who is involved in the selection process and how entrants are qualified.

What else do you look for when picking a hospital, clinic or doctor? Do you use ranking to help inform your decision? Let us know in the comments below!

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Mice Stem Cell Study Shows Promise for Hypopituitarism Treatment

Pituitary Gland

Hypopituitarism, also known as an underactive pituitary gland,  is a condition that affects the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland, in which the pituitary gland does not produce normal amounts of some or all of its hormones. Symptoms of hypopituitarism vary depending on which hormone is no longer being produced by the pituitary gland.

Treatments for hypopituitarism also vary. If the condition is caused as the result of a pituitary tumor, surgery may be needed for treatment. In some cases, hormone therapy is what’s needed to effectively treat hypopituitarism.

However, in the November 2011 issue of Nature, a new report shows promise for the future of hypopituitarism treatment. Japanese scientists successfully treated hypopituitary mice by transplanting pituitary gland tissue they grew from embryonic mice stem cells. After the hypopitiutary mice received the transplanted cells, they began to produce hormones they were previously missing.

Researchers used the mouse stem cells arranged in a three dimensional culture and grew pituitary tissue over the course of three weeks from that culture. The resulting tissue contained all five cell types found in a normal pituitary gland.

Using such technology as a possible treatment for humans suffering from hypopituitarism is not an immediately viable option. Scientists caution that is it unlikely that pituitary tissue grown in labs will behave like functioning pituitary glands. The hope is that someday, treatment for patients with pituitary disorders will be feasible via growing pituitary tissues from the patient’s own tissue.

“If and when the technology becomes developed for humans, it will require the skills of an experienced team of a pituitary endocrinologist and neurosurgeon working together with other specialists in a dedicated pituitary center to fully realize the potential opportunity for patients with pituitary hormonal deficiency,” says Dr. Nelson M. Oyesiku, Co-Director Emory Pituitary Center.

For more information on hypopituitarism, or the endocrinology & neurosurgery treatment teams at Emory, visit the Emory Pituitary website.

Congratulations to our 2011 Nurse of the Year Award Winners!

The March of Dimes celebrated excellence in nursing throughout Georgia on November 19 at the Hyatt Regency here in Atlanta. We’re very pleased to announce that 27 of our Emory Healthcare nurses were honored as finalists in the Georgia March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Award, and at Saturday’s event, 3 of our nurses were recipients of 2011 Nurse of the Year Awards! Our nurses receiving Nurse of the Year Award Honors at the March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Awards, hosted by Grady Health System, are listed below:

  • Debra Barker received top honors in the category of Critical Care
  • Judith Wold received top honors in the category of Public Health
  • Judy Gretz received top honors in the category of Women’s Health
Susan Grant, Chief Nursing Officer, Emory Healthcare

Susan Grant, Chief Nursing Officer, Emory Healthcare

More than 450 attended this second annual event that recognized nurses who embody leadership, compassion and excellence in patient care across all specialties. With such a special group to honor, an equally as special chair for the event was needed. Emory Healthcare’s own Chief Nursing Officer, Susan Grant MS, RN, NEA, FAAN, served as the chair of the awards ceremony; “I am very proud of these outstanding nursing professionals for being recognized by the March of Dimes in this inaugural Nurse of the Year event for the state of Georgia. This is a wonderful honor for Debra, Judith and Judy, and I congratulate all of the Emory nurses who were nominated, as well as the winners in each category,” says Susan. “This recognition and event is a wonderful way to honor the important role and significant impact of nursing within the communities, hospitals and clinics across the state of Georgia. I am grateful and honored by the opportunity to serve as chair and recognize these very special nurses.”

We second Susan’s gratitude. We are extremely grateful to our team of nurses at Emory Healthcare for all that they do each and every day to support and advance truly patient-centered care. We are proud of their tireless efforts and dedication to providing the highest quality health care possible for our patient and family community.

The Nurse of the Year selection committee reviewed hundreds of applications across 16 categories ranging from Home Health and Palliative Care to NICU and Critical Care disciplines. Nearly 200 finalists emerged, all representing the March of Dimes vision for a healthier, stronger generation of babies and families.

“Nurses play an incredibly critical role in our community. They are truly the unsung medical heroes of the healthcare field and we join the world in saluting them,” says Sheila Ryan, March of Dimes State Director.

Florence Nightingale, one of the pioneers in nursing, said, “Nursing is an art; and if it is to be made an art, it requires as exclusive a devotion, as hard a preparation, as any painter’s or sculptor’s work; for what is the having to do with dead canvas or cold marble, compared with having to do with the living body? [...] It is one of the Fine Arts; I had almost said the finest of the Fine Arts.”

Nursing truly is an art. And it takes a very special type of person dedicate his/her life to caring for others. We thank, honor and celebrate all of our nurses for all that they do!

Full list of Emory Healthcare’s 2011 March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Award Finalists:

Antonio Ash
Debra Barker
Carlene Beck
Marcia Bishop
Kelly Brewer
Paula Brookes Remedios
Carolyn Clevenger
Althea Charity Dimaculangan
Harolyn Dooley
Judy Dunn
Palactine Fleming
Erin George
Beverly Green
Judy Gretz
Vernon Griffith
Patricia Guasch
Martha Haack
Philip Joy
Cheryl Lee
Terri Marin
Gloria Myles
Ruth Simmons
Kelly Sutton
Robin Tarpley
Janice Temple
Elizabeth Thomas
Judith Lupo Wold

Screenings & Health Services with No Appointment, 7 Days a Week – Could Health Care Get Any Easier?

Emory Healthcare CVS MinuteClinic Partnership

Do you have a cough? Need a cholesterol screening? Allergy symptoms? All of these are things that as patients, many of us have experienced enough times to feel like we don’t need to schedule a formal doctor visit for them. But, because in the past, these services were usually only offered through a doctor’s office, there haven’t been too many other options. Now there is! Emory Healthcare has partnered with MinuteClinic, CVS’ retail health care division to provide access to high quality health care at your local CVS location for over 20 different common health services.

We know coming to Emory for more serious treatments or conditions is something that as an Atlanta resident, you probably already know exists as an option for you. But for those times where your earache at 7pm is a hassle and there isn’t a hospital or clinic location nearby or open, we’re hoping that our partnership with CVS means that you now have even more access to the high quality patient-centered health care provided at Emory.

You can trust that the care that you’ll receive at the 31 walk-in CVS MinuteClinic locations across Atlanta will be on par with the care you expect from Emory. Our physicians are serving as medical directors for MinuteClinic locations in Atlanta, and will also be collaborating on various patient education and prevention initiatives on a per-location basis.

So, what happens if you go to a CVS MinuteClinic location in Atlanta thinking your hives are due to allergic reaction, but really prove to be something more serious? The beauty of our partnership with CVS is that it opens up access to high quality health care for our patients in a variety of ways. If you require a level of care that is not provided at an Emory Healthcare supported MinuteClinic location, the care team onsite will be able to refer you. Emory Healthcare will accept patients who need a level of care not available through MinuteClinic.

If our partnership with CVS on its own doesn’t make getting access to high quality health care in Atlanta that much faster and easier for you, the fact that the 31 walk-in CVS MinuteClinic locations that we’re helping support are open 7 days a week, with no appointment necessary and visits as short as 15 minutes. MinuteClinic accepts most insurance and locations are open Monday-Friday, 8:30am-7:30pm; Saturday, 9am-5:30pm; and Sunday, 10am-5:30pm.

Indoor Tanning & Tanning Beds – the Bad, the Ugly and the Uglier

Indoor Tanning & Skin CancerOne in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime. It is the most common of all cancers and accounts for nearly half of all cancer cases in the United States. More than 2 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer are found in the U.S. each year. Melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer, will account for 70,230 new skin cancer diagnoses in 2011, according to the American Cancer Society. Now, let’s juxtapose these numbers with the fact that nearly 30 million people tan indoors in tanning beds in the U.S. every year and 2.3 million of them are teens. Furthermore, on an average day, over one million Americans use tanning salons1.

So, just how bad are tanning beds and does the increase in their use correlate with the increase in melanoma incidence rates over the last 30 years? Findings released in 2009 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, an affiliate of the World Health organization, demonstrate that indoor tanning beds and tanning devices are more dangerous than we previously thought, and as a result, the IARC moved UV tanning devices such as tanning beds from their Group 2A category, “probably carcinogenic to humans,” to their Group 1 list of the most dangerous cancer causing agents. Inclusion of a cancer causing agent or substance is listed in the IARC’s Group 1 means that agent or substance is definitely carcinogenic to humans. Other agents listed in Group 1 include plutonium and cigarettes.

As is mentioned above, 2.3 million of the people using indoor tanning beds and devices in the U.S. are teens. Because skin cancers such as melanoma can take a substantial amount of time to develop, along with moving tanning devices into their Group 1 category, the IARC also now recommends banning commercial indoor tanning use for people under the age of 18 in an effort to lower their risk for developing skin cancer later in life.

Back in 2006, the IARC took its efforts to identify the impact indoor tanning can have on skin cancer risk a step further by evaluating 19 studies conducted over 25 years that looked at the relationship between indoor tanning and skin cancer. Findings from this evaluation reveal:

  • there is an association between UV-emitting tanning devices and ocular melanoma (cancer of the eye)
  • there is an association between indoor tanning and both squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, two dangerous forms of skin cancer
  • the DNA damage caused by UVA and UVB rays can lead to skin cancer in laboratory animals. Most indoor tanning beds and devicese emit UVS rays.

But, the most notable finding from their evaluation is a scary one– the risk of developing melanoma skin cancer increases by 75% when indoor tanning device and tanning bed use starts before the age of 35.2

Hopefully these numbers and findings are enough to make you reconsider using tanning beds this summer and in future years. As the research continues to pour in, it becomes more and more clear just how dangerous indoor tanning (and outdoor tanning, for that matter) are.

For more information on tanning beds and the risks associated with their use, visit: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm186687.htm There you can also find guidelines for how to reduce your risk for skin cancer in you do decide to continue tanning indoors. But we encourage you to change your tanning habits and prioritize your health! If you’re seeking a golden bronze glow, why not try self-tanning lotions? What else do you recommend for lowering risk for skin cancer or alternatives to tanning? Let us know in the comments area below!

1: http://www.skincancer.org/Skin-Cancer-Facts/
2: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm186687.htm