Posts Tagged ‘medical research’

Understanding Clinical Trials – Part 2: What are the Benefits of Clinical Trials?

With any clinical trial, there are both benefits and risks associated; however, clinical trials are not just for sick people, unlike common perception. Both healthy people and people with certain diseases or conditions participate in clinical trials. While some participate to receive care or treatment only available through a clinical trial, others participate to help researchers find better treatments.

For researchers, physicians and health care professionals, clinical trials are extremely important because they allow us to make real-time differences in medicine. Treatment regimens, drugs and care-delivery protocols all exist today because of clinical studies conducted in the past. Clinical trials and research provide not only hope for our patients, but a possibility for better outcomes and medical advancements in the future.

As a leading academic medical center, Emory Healthcare is proud to offer more than 1,000 clinical trials to our patients. Some direct benefits patients receive by participating in clinical trials include:

  • Access to new treatments that are not yet available to the general public
  • Access to more effective treatments than the standard care therapies
  • Close oversight from medical experts at a leading health care facility in the Southeast
  • Helping others by contributing to medical research

The decision to participate in a clinical trial is completely voluntary; therefore, to help you and your loved ones decide whether or not to participate, it is important to understand any potential risks. The known risks and benefits are different depending on the clinical trial, so make sure you talk to members of the research team before making a decision.

In the video below, Emory researchers and doctors discuss the benefits of clinical trials.

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Learn More About Clinical Trials at Emory Healthcare
Find a Clinical Trial at Emory

Understanding Clinical Trials – Part 1: What are Clinical Trials?

What is a Clinical Trial

WATCH Winship at Emory patient and clinical trial participant, Holly Johnston, discuss her decision to enroll in a cancer clinical trial.

Clinical trials are an essential part of moving research forward and most medical advances have been made possible because of volunteer participation in clinical trials.

At Emory Healthcare, clinical trials are at the core of our mission where discovery and research fuel exceptional patient-and-family-centered care. But for many people, clinical studies seem complicated and intimidating. To answer some popular questions about clinical trials and clear up common misunderstandings, we are launching a six-part series on understanding clinical trials and why they are an important part of patient care.

What are clinical trials?

A clinical trial is a form of research that uses human volunteers (called participants) to answer specific questions that help doctors understand new ways to prevent, diagnose and treat diseases.

Existing treatments today may not be effective for everyone, so clinical trials help determine if new drugs, diagnostics or procedures are safe and effective before they are made widely available. There are different types of clinical trials, but all start with a question. An example question would be “does the dose of this drug impact its effectiveness?” A well-designed clinical trial is set up to provide answers to the original question.

What happens during a clinical trial?

Every clinical trial is led by a principal investigator, who is usually a medical doctor, and they typically have a research team including doctors, nurses, social workers and other members of the care team. New treatment therapies are usually tested in three separate phases before regulatory agencies consider them safe and effective.

During a clinical trial, data is collected to help inform the study outcome, which can be positive or negative. Either way, a clinical study is successful if the answer to the initial question is clear and has a solid foundation of scientific data to support it. Even if the outcome is different than the principal investigator’s hypothesis, the end result informs which direction the research team should take next.

Clinical Trials at Emory

There are more than 1,000 clinical trials underway at Emory Healthcare and the outcomes are not only making a difference in people’s lives here and now, but for generations to come.

As we continue our blog series on understanding clinical trials, we want to know what questions you have about clinical trials and clinical research. Leave your questions in the comments field below and your question may just get answered by an Emory researcher!

Also, click to see a list of frequently asked questions about clinical trials.

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