Posts Tagged ‘events’

Join Us for the 4th Annual Johns Creek Community Health Festival & 5K Scrub Run!

Johns Creek Community Health Festival & 5KOn Saturday, May 4, Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) will host its 4th Annual Community Health Festival and 5K Scrub Run/Walk. This year, we are also excited to offer electronics recycling and document shredding as well. All are invited to attend. We look forward to seeing you there!

LOCATION
Emory Johns Creek Hospital
6325 Hospital Parkway
Johns Creek, GA
Parking is FREE. Designated lots surrounding the hospital will be open for parking.

ABOUT THE 5K RACE
The run starts and finishes on the EJCH campus and is open to participants of all abilities. All proceeds will benefit the Chattahoochee High School Cross Country Teams as well as the Emory Johns Creek Hospital Foundation, which will provide an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) device for a local school, yet to be revealed.

ABOUT THE HEALTH FESTIVAL
Admission to the Health Festival is FREE! Activities include:

  • Free Health Screenings – cholesterol, glucose, blood pressure, bone density, body mass index (BMI) calculations, and more!
  • Meet Our Physicians
  • Health & Wellness Education
  • Kidz Zone
  • Johns Creek Fire & Police Departments
  • Electronics recycling and document shredding (provided by Reworx; Hours of recycling event: 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)

For more information about the 4th Annual Community Health Festival and 5K Scrub Run/Walk, please call 678-474-8200. Thank you!

Join Us for Ladies Night Out

ladies night out flyerEmory Johns Creek Hospital is hosting a Ladies’ Night Out Thursday, October 18, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Physicians’ Plaza. Join us for free health screenings, casual conversations with physicians over dessert and coffee, and a chance to win door prizes. In celebration and recognition of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’ll be hosting a special breast cancer awareness and prevention panel with physicians at 7pm.

Registration is encouraged but not required. Call 678.474.8200 to register. This event is presented in partnership with the Junior League of Gwinnett & North Fulton Counties.

Also, be sure to check out some of our upcoming informational seminars and the awareness events being offered by our family at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Bariatric Surgery
October 16 and November 7, 8, 14 and 20, from 7 to 9 p.m. Suite 109.

Childbirth Preparation Class

Classes are held as a four-week series on Thursdays or one full-day class on Sunday, October 14, Saturday, November 10, and Sunday, December 2. The next four-week series begins October 25. Meeting Room 3.

Breast-feeding Class
Classes are held every three weeks on a Saturday. Fall classes will be held October 20, November 17 and December 8, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Meeting Room 3.

Related Resources

Uterine Fibroid Embolization: a Non-Surgical Option for Uterine Fibroids

 

Uterine Fibroid Embolization Web ChatMany women who have uterine fibroids go through their days with no noticeable symptoms. They may even be unaware they have fibroids at all. However, for a small percentage, daily life can be significantly impacted by symptoms.

Uterine fibroids are non-cancerous growths that occur in the wall of the uterus. They may be as small as a pea or as large as a cantaloupe. They can cause a host of disruptive symptoms: unusually heavy or long menstrual periods, pressure on the bladder leading to frequent trips to the bathroom, bloating, pain during sexual intercourse and pain in the pelvis, legs, or lower back. Uterine fibroids are common and affect 20% to 40% of women 20 years or older and occur in half of African American women. So far, doctors have been unable to pinpoint why fibroids are more common in African Americans or why women develop them at all. What we do know is that heredity and obesity are risk factors and that hormone levels play a role.

Traditionally, treatment for women with problematic uterine fibroids has been surgical— hysterectomy or myomectomy (surgical removal of the fibroids after a uterine evaluation from a gynecologist). In fact, unwanted fibroid symptoms trigger approximately 200,000 hysterectomies each year.

For close to 20 years, interventional radiologists, myself included, have used a nonsurgical alternative to treat women who suffer with uterine fibroids. This minimally invasive procedure is called embolization.  The technique itself is not new, but its application to fibroids is.  For more than three decades, physicians have used embolization to treat pelvic bleeding due to other causes (trauma, tumors, surgical complications).  Embolization has proven to be an effective means to shrink uterine fibroids and alleviate the symptoms they cause.

Throughout my years of practice, most women who have come to me seeking information on uterine fibroid embolization have come on their own looking for an alternative to surgery. However, most women who are offered a hysterectomy do not know that there is less invasive solution.

In fact, compared to the surgical options, embolization results in fewer complications, a shorter hospital stay and a far quicker recovery time.  It has an 85% to 92% success rate compared with myomectomy — 10% to 30% of myomectomy patients develop fibroids again. Long term data now shows that about 75% of women who have uterine fibroid embolization report ongoing satisfaction and continuous symptomatic relief for 5-7 years following the procedure.  In fact, most women I treat report a significant improvement in their symptoms at their first post procedure check-up.

An embolization is performed through a small puncture in a groin artery. Dye is injected into the artery to identify which blood vessels supply the uterus and fibroids. The interventional radiologist then guides a wire and catheter into the identified vessels and injects small particles that block the blood supply to the fibroids. The fibroids and the uterus shrink approximately 50-60% in the first year. Heavy periods usually take a few cycles to lessen. The procedure takes approximately an hour followed by a day’s stay in the hospital for intravenous pain medication. Patients can usually resume normal activity after a week.

If you have additional questions about uterine fibroid embolization, please join Roger Williams, DO, and me as we host a free live web chat on the topic of UFE on June 13, 2012 (12:30 p.m. EST). Bring your questions and get ready for a great discussion!

Dr. Gail Peters

About the Author
Gail Peters, M.D. is an Assistant Professor of Radiology at Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown. Dr. Peters’ specialties are in Interventional Radiology, Pediatric Radiology with clinical interests in Fibroid Embolization.

UFE Related Resources:

Join us for the Emory Johns Creek Hospital Health Festival & 5K Scrub Run!

Emory Johns Creek Hospital 5K Scrub RunMark your calendar for the Emory Johns Creek Hospital Community Health Festival Saturday, May 19, from 8 a.m. to noon. We will have something for everyone at this fun, family-friendly event: kids’ crafts at the Kidz Zone, free health screenings, an opportunity to meet and talk with our physicians, fire safety and K-9 demonstrations by the Johns Creek Fire and Police Departments, and tasty treats from local vendors. We are pleased to welcome the Johns Creek Chamber and the Junior League of Gwinnett and North Fulton Counties aspartners for this event.

The Festival kicks off Saturday morning with the annual 5K Scrub Run at 8 a.m. Proceeds from the 5K Scrub Run benefit the Emory Johns Creek Hospital 5K Fund, which provides life-saving AEDs (automate external defibrillators) to the community. Sign up for the 5K Scrub Run & we’ll see you on the 19th!

Related Resources:

Second Graders Help Name Emory Johns Creek Hospital Robot!

Emory Johns Creek Hospital Robotics Open HouseEmory Johns Creek Hospital has a new da Vinci® robot, and the second grade students at State Bridge Elementary School have helped us name it! At the beginning of April, the second graders were invited to participate in our “Name the Robot” contest. They colored in pictures of the robot and suggested fun names for it. They also learned how the hospital uses this revolutionary robotic technology for surgery. Johns Creek High School’s Robotics Seminar students chose the winning name for us from among the entries.

The “Name the Robot” contest winner will get a behind-the scenes tour of one of Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s operating rooms, and everyone in the winner’s class will receive acoupon from Chick-fil-A. A prize is also being awarded forthe most artistic coloring. The kids did a great job, and their colorful entries will be display in the hospital’s cafeteria from April 23 to May 8. We cannot wait to announce the winner Tuesday, May 8, at our “Name the Robot” Open House! We will celebrate with juice and cookies and a robot demonstration, and you are invited to join us. We hope to see you there!

RSVP to our Facebook event!

Comfort Foods: Substitution is the Name of the Game

Mahed Cauliflower Substitute for Potatoes When it comes to favorite comfort foods, mashed potatoes, mac’n cheese, and ice cream tend to top everyone’s list. Their rich, creamy texture tastes great but the calories can add up quickly since they are usually high in fat and carbohydrates. How can you have a favorite comfort food and watch your calories? Let’s talk substitution.

Using mashed potatoes as an example, simply substitute a high fiber vegetable like cauliflower for the potatoes in the recipe. This shaves off calories and carbohydrates while adding more nutrients. Cauliflower is a nutrient powerhouse, loaded with more calcium, fiber, vitamin C, folate, and vitamin K than a comparable amount of white potatoes.

Nutritional Breakdown Before Substitution:

Here is the breakdown for one serving of regular mashed potatoes (with butter and cream) from a popular cooking website.1 (We actually cut the serving size in half since what they listed as a serving was enormous!) Mashed potatoes:  1 serving =  ¾ cup, 400 calories, 35 grams fat, 25 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams fiber.2

Nutritional Breakdown After Substitution:

However, you can substitute steamed cauliflower for the potato and add additional ingredients that boost flavor and cut the fat. Per serving, you save 200 calories, 25 grams of fat, and 10 grams of carbohydrates!

This substitution allows you to keep a favorite comfort food on the menu. Experiment with other recipes, using ingredients that cut calories and boost flavor. Check out this website for ways to reduce calories while still enjoying your favorite foods3. Unfortunately, cauliflower ice cream just doesn’t sound that good.

Mashed Cauliflower Recipe (Serves 3)

1 medium head cauliflower
½ cup diced onions
1 Tablespoon cooking oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
¼ to ½ cup 2% milk (any type of low-fat, non-dairy milk would work too)
Salt and pepper to taste

Cut stem and leaves off cauliflower. Wash and drain trimmed cauliflower. Cut into large chunks and boil or steam on stovetop for approximately 8 minutes, or until cauliflower is soft. While cauliflower is steaming, sauté onions in oil in small skillet over medium heat until transparent. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute more. Remove from heat. Add steamed cauliflower, onion mixture, butter and ¼ cup milk to food processor or blender. Process on high until all ingredients are combined and smooth. Can add additional milk if desire thinner consistency. Season as desired. Serve immediately or cool in refrigerator, then reheat in microwave.

Nutrition per serving: Portion size: ¾ cup, 200 calories, 10 grams fat, 15 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams fiber

1FoodNetwork.com Mashed Potato Recipe
2USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory

Top 5 Reasons to Run in the Winship Win the Fight 5K

Winship 5K RaceWinship Cancer Institute is holding its inaugural 5K this Saturday, Oct. 15! We want you there, and not just because we’re running – and walking – to raise money for cancer research at Winship.

Over the years, research has shown more convincingly than ever that maintaining a healthy body weight, eating healthful foods and having a regular exercise program can lower your risk of cancer.

We think the Winship Win the Fight 5K is a great way for us to all join together not only in the fight against cancer but also to have fun in a healthy way. It’s not too late to register, so please consider joining us this Saturday at 8 a.m. at McDonough Field on Emory’s campus. You can sign up here. Pre-race day bib pick-up will be available Friday, October 14, from 4 – 8 p.m. in the Woodruff Physical Education Center located on Emory University campus.

Free parking for bib pick-up is available at the Peavine parking deck located at: 29 Eagle Row, Atlanta, GA, 30322. There will be signs to quide you. OR, if you want more time to think about it, you can register at 6:30 Saturday morning onsite.

Here are the top five benefits of running or walking in the Winship Win the Fight 5K!

  1. Exercise has been shown to lower your cancer risk. It does so by helping your body avoid chronic, systemic inflammation, which wreaks havoc on your cells.
  2. Exercise has been shown to lower risk of cancer recurrence among those who already have been diagnosed.
  3. Exercise, in combination with a good diet, can lower your body weight. That in turn can lower levels of circulating insulin, which can fuel cancer growth.
  4. Exercise lowers levels of stress hormones that may put a person at higher risk of developing cancer.
  5. RUNNING IN THE 5K IS GOING TO BE FUN! COME JOIN THE FUN AND HELP US WITH THE FIGHT!

Join Us for a Voice Center Open House

Melissa Statham, MDThe Emory Voice Center is pleased to welcome Melissa Statham, MD as the latest addition to the Voice Center’s team of voice specialists!

Melissa Statham, MD, is a laryngologist specializing in pediatric voice disorders and care of the adult professional voice, airway and swallowing conditions.

A graduate of the University of Louisville School of Medicine, Dr. Statham completed her residency in otolaryngology at the University of Cincinnati, and pursued two fellowships following her residency. The first for laryngology and care of the professional voice at the University of Pittsburgh Voice Center, and the second in pediatric otolaryngology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center.

Dr. Statham has expertise in treating pediatric and adult voice conditions and airway disorders. Her research interests focus on pediatric voice disorders, novel laryngeal electromyography techniques and outcomes from pediatric and adult major airway surgery.

Please join us at the Emory Voice Center for an Open House and reception to help welcome Dr. Statham to the Emory Voice Center. You can register for the open house online, or use the phone number below. Event details are listed below:

What: Welcome Reception and Open House for Melissa Statham, MD
When: Thursday, March 24 at 4 – 6 p.m.
Where: Emory Voice Center

(550 Peachtree Street, 9th Floor, Atlanta, GA 30308)

To RSVP: Please Call 404-778-7777 or Register Online

New Application for an Old Technique

Dr. Gail Peters talks about a non-surgical treatment for uterine fibroids

Many women who have uterine fibroids go through their days with no noticeable symptoms. They may even be unaware they have fibroids at all. However, for a small percentage who have symptoms, daily life can be interrupted continually by pain.

Uterine fibroids can cause a host of disruptive symptoms: unusually heavy or long menstrual periods, pain during sexual intercourse, pressure on the bladder leading to frequent trips to the bathroom, bloating, and pain in the pelvis, legs, or lower back. They affect 20% to 40% of women 20 years or older and occur in half of African American women. So far, doctors are unable to pinpoint why fibroids are more common in African Americans or why women develop them at all. But they do know that heredity and obesity are factors.

Women with problematic uterine fibroids traditionally have had only two options—a hysterectomy or a myomectomy (surgical removal of the fibroids). In fact, unwanted fibroid symptoms trigger approximately 150,000 hysterectomies each year.

Over the past decade, an old technique is providing women who suffer with uterine fibroids with a nonsurgical alternative. Physicians have used embolization for more than two decades to treat pelvic bleeding or trauma, and now they are using the procedure to shrink uterine fibroids too.

“If a gynecologist has offered a hysterectomy, a women should look into uterine fibroid embolization,” says Emory interventional radiologist Gail Peters. “The procedure is less invasive, better tolerated, and requires less time for recuperation.”

Although the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recognizes embolization as a viable treatment for uterine fibroids, Peters says that some doctors are failing to talk to women about the option. “Most women come to me on their own and are looking for an alternative to surgery,” she says

What she tells them is that embolization offers fewer complications and a quicker recovery than surgical options. It has an 85% to 92% success rate compared with myomectomy, after which 10% to 30% of patients develop fibroids again. And women who experience embolization can fore-go the three- to four-day hospital stays and four to six weeks of recovery that accompany hysterectomies.

An embolization is performed through a small puncture in a groin artery. Dye is injected into the artery to identify which blood vessels supply the uterus and fibroids. The radiologist then guides a wire and catheter into the identified vessels and injects small particles that block the blood supply to the fibroids. The fibroids and the uterus shrink approximately 60% in the first year. Heavy periods usually take a few cycles to lessen. The procedure takes approximately an hour followed by a day’s stay in the hospital for intravenous pain medication. Patients usually can resume normal activity after a week.

“Most of the women I’ve treated report a significant improvement in their symptoms at their first-month check-up,” Peters says.

Learn more in person at a free seminar on Thursday, February 3rd. Call 404-778-7777 or go online to register. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 404-712-7033.

Giving Thanks to Our Community – The Year in Review

Emory Healthcare CommunityThe holidays are a time for friends, families, loved ones and communities to come together, celebrate, and give thanks for our blessings and reflect on the year. At Emory Healthcare, we do all we can to promote and celebrate health year-round. But the holidays are a poignant time to celebrate and honor you, our community, for playing a key role in our accomplishments. With you as our partner, together we have proven we can achieve great things to improve the lives of so many. Over the course of any given year at Emory, there are innumerable accomplishments and developments to be excited about. In 2010, together we’ve seen some wonderful things happen in our Emory community:

  • We performed our 300th lung transplant, and saw Jo Ellen Kimball celebrate her new found health.
  • We watched our 500th heart transplant patient, Terry Green, serve as Grand Marshal for the Emory Healthcare 500, one of the biggest NASCAR events of the year! On race day, we were able to touch the lives of hundreds of race attendees from Georgia and states throughout the nation with free health screenings.
  • We partnered with our community and participated in the 2010 Atlanta Heart Walk, and for the 9th year in a row, led the way in fund raising by raising almost $300,000 to give back to the American Heart Association to aid in their fight against heart disease and stroke.
  • Our doctors performed more than $48.9 million in charity care for our community over the past year, and more than $20 million in uncompensated care at Grady.
  • For the 20th year in a row, Emory University Hospital and many of its specialty programs were ranked as top in the nation by U.S. News & World Report’s 2010 list of America’s Best Hospitals.
  • We participated in and sponsored the AJC Peachtree Road Race, an annual community event  for the 16th year in a row.
  • We were recognized for being one of the only health care systems in the state to implement a mandatory flu vaccine policy for all employees in an effort to minimize the spread of influenza from caregivers and employees to patients and visitors. For our achievement of 100% compliance in 2009-2010, we were honored by the Georgia Medical Care Foundation. We were also honored by the Joint Commission with Gold Tier Status for our influenza vaccination rate.
  • We partnered with Georgia Tech as the official health care provider for Georgia Tech Athletics, and the Atlanta Motor Speedway, as the official health care provider of the facility.
  • We were honored with three Beacon Awards for Nursing Excellence. Only 300 ICUs (out of about 6,000) across the U.S. have received the prestigious award, and only 6 Beacon Awards have been given to programs in Georgia.
  • We launched our blog, http://advancingyourhealth.org, which you’re reading now! It brings together our overall health care blog, as well as thematic blogs for heart & vascular, cancer, transplant, vision, weight management, and orthopedics, with more to come in 2011!
  • We work with and support more than 20 local organizations through monetary and volunteer support, including the Atlanta Community Food Bank through our annual Virtual Can Food Drive.  Check out the full list of organizations we support!
  • Every year our nursing students provide free health screenings and health clinics for migrant farm workers and their families in South Georgia.
  • You — our community — named Emory University Hospital the “Consumer’s Choice” for the 13th year in a row.

We accomplished all of these things (and many more!) under the umbrella of our promise to deliver not just the best health care available, but the best patient-centered care around. This means that with every step we take and every goal achieved, our focus is on you — our community, our patients, and our families. So it is you, our community, who deserves the thanks this holiday season. We thank you for giving us the opportunity to focus on working with you, rather than on you, and we look forward to the opportunity to continue partnering with you in 2011 and for many years to come.