Posts Tagged ‘Emory University Hospital’

New study uses cryoablation to reduce pain for cancer patients

Cyro_prologo_5

Kevin Makowski, RBP

A new study using cryoablation to decrease pain for patients who have cancer metastases in the bone is now underway throughout Emory Healthcare. Cryoablation is a process that uses extreme cold (cryo) to destroy or damage tissue (ablation).

Called the “Multicenter Study of Cryoablation for Palliation of Painful Bone Metastases”, or MOTION, the study aims to assess the effectiveness and safety of cryoablation therapy to treat patients with painful bone metastases and document the effects the procedure has on their condition.

The prospective, single-arm study will enroll 60 participants at eight centers in the U.S. and internationally. Twenty participants can enroll at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital. Participants will serve as their own control group in this one-year study.

The clinical trial examines self-reported pain scores from the patients. Investigators are assessing improvement in scores defined by more than a two-point reduction in the worst pain in the last 24 hours, using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), from before the cryoablation procedure to eight weeks after the procedure takes place. The trial will assess patients experiencing pain at a level of 4 or above on a scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (unimaginable pain).

The goal is to freeze cancerous cells and stop the pain signals to the brain. We use image guidance to insert the ablation probe into the middle of a painful cancer lesion. Then, we create an ablation zone by lowering the temperature to minus 40 degrees centigrade for 10 minutes.

Emory interventional radiologists freeze tumors in order to kill cancer cells in contact with the bone and reduce the size of the tumor. CT images obtained during the procedure helps doctors guide needles into the tumor.

Cryoablation provides an alternative for patients who haven’t experienced relief from current pain therapies. Many patients suffering from cancer pain take several medications to cope with the pain.

The outpatient cryoablation procedure takes about an hour.

Galil Medical is funding this clinical trial.

For more information about this study, contact the study coordinator, Maria Rivas at 404-712-7962.

Learn more about other available trials.  http://clinicaltrials.emory.edu/

Dr. J. David Prologo

J. David Prologo, MDdavid_prologo_photo, is an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at Emory’s School of Medicine, and director of Interventional Radiology Services at EJCH. Prologo is the principal site investigator for the MOTION study, and one of 10 subspecialty trained, board certified interventional radiologists at Emory.

Healthy Participant Raises Awareness for Importance of Clinical Trials

cmv_brittanyBrittany Robinson of Suwanee, GA, recently spent eight days and nights at Emory University Hospital, but she was not sick. To some people, spending over a week away from her husband and five children may seem crazy, but for Brittany, it was a personal way to give back and say thank you to the hospital that helped her son, Ethan.

Ethan was diagnosed at birth with the heart defect Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome with Ebstein’s anomaly, and was treated at Emory-Children’s Center. “My son was on medication from nine months old until last year. If there wasn’t someone doing this for him, for his heart medication, who knows what would have happened,” said Robinson. The medicine prescribed to Ethan went through the same process rigorous clinical trials process that all new drugs must go through.

It was this realization that prompted Brittany to enroll in an in-patient research study (A Phase I Trial to Evaluate the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Multiple Ascending Doses of MBX-400 in Healthy Volunteers), testing the oral medication MBX-400 to treat cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection.

CMV is a common virus that can infect the majority of the population but can cause severe eye, neurologic, and organ diseases in patients with a weakened immune system. The oral and IV medications currently used to treat CMV have limitations and many scientists are stepping up to help find a new treatment. The study’s enrollment criteria requires only healthy people can enroll.

Allison Beck, PA, Mari Hart, RN, Nadine Rouphael, MD, and a team of Research Coordinators with the Hope Clinic have been recruiting for months to fully enroll this trial. Their struggle is common for clinical trial recruitment. People are hesitant because they do not want to be a “guinea pig” or are too busy to interrupt their normal routine though most studies provide compensation for time and travel. Unfortunately, people like Brittany who’ve relied on the medical field to save their loved ones usually do not make the incredible connection she made. This study is still enrolling and only has half the participants needed to complete the trial.

“Without research, we do not have the treatments and cures that save our loved ones. New medicines and vaccines that work and are safe are only discovered when heroes like Brittany and her family are willing to give their time to research and enroll in a study,” said study PI Mark Mulligan, MD, distinguished professor, Department of Medicine and executive director, Hope Clinic of the Emory Vaccine Center, Emory University. While Brittany may never know anyone with CMV, she is helping to give better treatments to those who are ill.

Every medication, treatment, or medical device currently available was FDA mandated to go through this process to prove safety and efficacy. This pipeline of new treatments and cures stops if trials cannot find participants. Clinical trials close and treatments and cures never make it to those who are ill.

After eight days at Emory University Hospital, Robinson says she feels better than ever and is more in-touch with her overall health. “The experience has been wonderful. I was actually very nervous going into it. I’ve never been away from my family for this long before. But I feel better, because you have to do a fast, can have no alcohol or caffeine, and I’ve actually gotten sleep. I feel refreshed, like a paid vacation,” said Robinson. The in-patient trial provides all meals, a room with a view, and the quiet needed for adequate rest. Something Robinson says she has not had since her first son was born eight years ago.

The Emory Hope Clinic needs more volunteer participants for this study and others. More information is available at www.hopeclinic.emory.edu and by calling 404-712-1371. The study is conducted by Emory’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH).

RESOURCES
Read Brittany’s full story here
ACTSI
Clinical Trials at Emory

cta-clinical-trials

Emory University Hospital – Recognized as Top-Performing Academic Medical Center 5th Year in a Row

The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC®) has presented Emory University Hospital with their Bernard A. Birnbaum, MD, Quality Leadership Award for the fifth consecutive year!

This award, formerly named the UHC Quality Leadership Award, recognizes top-performing academic medical centers. Emory University Hospital ranked No. 4 in the country among all UHC member institutions that were included in the 2015 Quality and Accountability Study. This is the 5th year in a row that Emory University Hospital has been a top 10 recipient of this award.

The Bernard A. Birnbaum, MD, Quality Leadership Award is given to UHC member academic medical centers that have demonstrated superior performance in quality and safety as measured by the UHC Quality and Accountability Study, which has been conducted since 2005. This study uses the Institute of Medicine’s six domains of care: timeliness, safety, equity, effectiveness, efficiency, and patient centeredness, to structure the analysis criteria. The award was announced at the UHC Annual Conference 2015 on October 1, 2015.

Emory University Hospital Midtown, our other hospital eligible for the UHC rankings, ranked 24 nationally.  Additionally, Emory University Hospital Midtown received UHC’s Supply Chain Performance Excellence Award, ranking No. 4 nationally.

In a new category this year – Ambulatory Care Quality and Accountability Study and Ranking – Emory Clinic ranked No. 5 nationally.  This award is given to academic medical centers that demonstrated excellence in delivering exceptional outpatient care in the following areas:  access to care, capacity management and throughput, quality and efficiency, continuum of care and equity.

These rankings are made possible by our physicians, nurses, leadership teams and staff that work hard on a daily basis at all of our Emory Healthcare facilities to provide our patients with outstanding patient- and family-centered care each and every day.

Learn more about the UHC Quality and Accountability Study.

Dirt Does Good: From Construction Site to Soccer Field

Emory Sustainable ConstructionAs you can imagine, digging space for a nine-level, 450,000-square-foot building with 500 underground parking spaces kicks up a lot of dirt! To continue all sustainability efforts with the new bed tower construction on Clifton Campus, the construction team set a goal to find another organization that could use the dirt that was displaced during the site expansion. As luck would have it, they found a most deserving recipient!

Multiple dump trucks hauled 78,000 cubic yards of dirt and filling material from the Emory University Hospital expansion site to Clarkston, GA. The dirt will be used to construct a soccer field at the Fugees Academy, the nation’s only school dedicated to refugee education. Fugees Family, Inc., is a non-profit organization devoted to working with child survivors of war. The organization’s efforts include year-round soccer for 90 boys and girls ages 10-18, after-school tutoring, soccer for 50 elementary-aged students, an academic enrichment summer camp and the Fugees Academy.

A.L. Grading Contractors, Inc., imported and placed the dirt at the site, while Breedlove Land Planning provided engineering services, which together would have cost more than $1 million. In the spirit of assisting Fugees Family in its philanthropic endeavor of providing recreational and learning opportunities for the refugee children residing in the Clarkston area, A.L. Grading’s lump sum fee was just $1.00.

Stay up to date on construction updates at emoryhealthcare.org/expansion!

Emory Ebola Team to Receive Award for Exceptional Nursing

Obama at Emory

Last year, President Obama met with Emory University Hospital physicians, nurses and staff involved in the treatment of Ebola patients.

Emory Healthcare has been given the privilege of treating multiple patients infected with Ebola virus. Emory University Hospital’s special isolation unit, built in cooperation with the CDC, is one of four Serious Communicable Disease Units (SCDU) in the U.S. Our highly trained, exceptional staff and physicians are now being honored for the extraordinary care they provided to critically ill patients diagnosed with Ebola virus disease.

The National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) and the DAISY Foundation will award Emory’s Ebola Team with the National Patient Safety Foundation’s DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses at the NPSF Patient Safety Congress on April 29-May 1 in Austin, Texas.

This award stems from the DAISY (Diseases Attacking the Immune System) Foundation’s signature program, the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses, which is given in over 1,900 health care facilities in all 50 states and in 14 other countries. Nurses who received the DAISY Award within their organizations in 2013 or 2014 were eligible for this new, national award, which places special emphasis on patient and workforce safety. This national award recognizes some of the most exceptional contributions to patient safety by nurses.

Related Resources

Emory Healthcare Turns Trash into Treasure

Emory RecyclesMetal hand railings, bathroom plumbing fixtures, signage, kitchen cabinets, doors and windows – these items come to mind when renovating or building a new structure, but they should also be considered when demolishing a building, too. Sometimes, these materials don’t need to end up in the dumpster!

The Emory Healthcare (EHC) Facilities Management team partnered with a group of volunteers from the Lifecycle Building Center to redefine what it means to reuse and repurpose at EHC.

To make room for the new hospital bed tower on Clifton Road, the Emory University sorority houses on Gambrell Drive were demolished. , Facilities Management salvaged many items, such as those listed above, from the sorority houses. Rather than throwing away perfectly useful building fixtures, the Lifecycle Building Center will repurpose the items throughout the community for use in other building construction and renovation projects.

The Lifecycle Building Center is a non-profit organization in Atlanta that diverts construction and demolition waste by salvaging reusable building materials and making them available to the public through a variety of means, including a retail operation in southwest Atlanta. The proceeds of the retail store are reinvested back into the community through programs that promote resource efficiency in the built environment. At the core of the center’s mission is the redirection of materials to organizations in need, which has both local and global impacts. Some of the salvaged materials from the sorority houses, such as a bike rack, cabinetry, fire extinguishers and ADA-compliant sinks, have been offered to local organizations, schools and fire departments in need of such items.

As Emory Healthcare is committed to going green throughout the entire new tower construction, this process will help reduce the amount of landfill waste produced, while giving back to the community.

Stay up to date on construction updates at emoryhealthcare.org/expansion!

Emory Healthcare: Always Growing and Improving

EUH construction update 2015If you’ve visited Emory University Hospital (EUH) or Emory Clinic on Clifton Road, you’ve noticed a lot of changes happening! Several construction projects are taking place to prepare for the arrival of a new hospital tower, which will provide additional beds and clinical space on the Clifton Campus.

The new bed tower will be patient- and family-centered facility, which we anticipate will open in 2017. It will include:

  • 210 patient beds
  • 450,000 square feet and nine levels
  • Patient care units for cancer and transplant (liver, pancreas, kidney)
  • Diagnostic and treatment spaces
  • ICU rooms
  • General Medical/Surgical rooms
  • 500 underground parking spaces
  • A new pedestrian bridge concourse that will connect EUH, Emory Clinic and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University to the new building

With some services relocating to the new tower, services currently at Emory University Hospital will relocate to newly renovated space in the existing EUH location. The Emergency Department at EUH will remain in its recently expanded location.

What’s been accomplished?
Access to and around EUH and Emory Clinic buildings has already been improved due to the completion of the following projects:

  • Reconfiguration of Woodruff Circle to centralize shuttle pickup/drop-off areas, which eased traffic congestion by removing 500+ shuttles per day off of Lowergate Drive
  • EUH Emergency Department expansion and renovation, which now boasts 34 beds in an 18,300 square-foot space
  • Third floor EUH operating room expansion and renovation
  • EUH valet improvements that doubled the size of the operation
  • Build out of new Admissions and Care Initiation Unit on the 2nd floor of EUH
  • Reconfiguration of the Emory Clinic valet area, which provides better traffic flow, coverage for patients waiting for their cars, a spacious lobby, better wayfinding and a covered pedestrian bridge from the parking deck.

For updated information on our progress with these projects and more, be sure to visit emoryhealthcare.org/expansion often!

Emory Healthcare Ranks Nationally for Quality and Safety Excellence

UHC Quality Leadership Winner 2014University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC), a national organization comprised of most of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, has ranked Emory University Hospital (which includes Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital) eighth in the nation in the 2014 UHC Quality Leadership Awards. This is the fourth consecutive year that Emory University Hospital has ranked in the top 10 for demonstrating superior performance in delivering high-quality care and safety excellence.

Emory University Hospital Midtown, which is Emory Healthcare’s second academic and eligible hospital, ranked in the top quartile as 22nd nationally.

The Quality Leadership Award honors top performers in UHC’s Quality and Accountability Study, which ranks performance in the areas of: mortality, effectiveness, safety, equity, patient centeredness and efficiency. These rankings are the most rigorous in health care and look at how major teaching hospitals are doing in multiple dimensions of quality and safety. They are traditionally looked upon as providing the best, most non-biased national quality measurement system available for teaching hospitals.

Since 2006, we have been on a journey to have our two academic hospitals – Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown – rank highly by the UHC. In 2012, we met our goal as Emory University Hospital ranked number two and Emory University Hospital Midtown ranked number six. We have made outstanding progress, and ranked 2nd and 3rd last year. “We are proud of our successes, as our number one priority at Emory Healthcare is to provide safe, high-quality care for our patients,” said John Fox, president and CEO of Emory Healthcare.

A top ranking by UHC means more than just great care. Since UHC ranks only academic medical centers that typically treat America’s sickest, most complex patient cases, and a disproportionate number of patients who are uninsured, underinsured or indigent, ranking highly on the list of the 101 participants reflects the ultimate assessment of organizational performance in setting the standard in quality and safety.

President Obama Meets Emory Ebola Team

Obama at EmoryPresident Barack Obama met with Ebola experts from Emory Healthcare as part of his Sept. 16 visit to the federal Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

Obama visited the Atlanta-based CDC for an update on the Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa and the U.S. response to it. The president met with Emory University Hospital physicians, nurses and others involved with the treatment of Ebola patients here before giving an address where he announced a significant expansion of U.S. efforts to combat the disease.

The president’s meetings with the Emory Healthcare team were closed to the press, but he discussed Emory’s efforts in his public remarks, saying, “Here I have got to commend everybody at Emory University Hospital. I just had the opportunity to meet with Doctors Gartland and Ribner and members of their team and the nurses who — sorry doctors, but having been in hospitals, I know they are the ones really doing the work — and I had a chance to thank them for their extraordinary efforts in helping to provide care for the first Americans who recently contracted the disease in Africa.”

Last month, Emory University Hospital became the first hospital in the United States to treat patients with Ebola virus disease. Emory’s first two Ebola patients, both American citizens who became infected with the virus while providing humanitarian aid in West Africa, were cared for in a special isolation unit. Both were discharged in late August after Emory physicians determined, in collaboration with the CDC and state health departments, that they had recovered from Ebola virus infection and posed no public health concerns.

A third patient with Ebola arrived at Emory from West Africa on Sept. 9 and is being treated in the same isolation unit.

Related Resources:

 

Emory and Ebola – FAQ’s

Emory Healthcare New BrandEmory Healthcare has been given the privilege of treating multiple patients infected with Ebola virus.  Emory University Hospital physicians, nurses and staff are highly trained in the specific and unique protocols and procedures necessary to treat and care for these type of patients. We are honored to have the privilege of caring for these patients who contracted Ebola while serving our global community. It is our moral obligation to always use our expertise, training, knowledge and gifts to provide such extraordinary care for others.

We have prepared the following FAQs to provide more information on the topic of Ebola and Emory’s care for patients infected with this deadly virus. You can also watch this Video Q&A from Emory Healthcare Physicians on Ebola.

About Ebola

About Emory University Hospital

Related Resources: