Posts Tagged ‘Emory Johns Creek Hospital’

Emory Johns Creek Hospital to offer free health screenings at women’s health event

Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) will host its annual Ladies’ Night Out event devoted to women’s health on Thursday, Feb. 23 from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Free health screenings will be offered to women including: glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure and body mass index. Clinicians will also be on hand to educate women about breast health, cardiovascular disease and signs of stroke and heart attacks.

Jennifer Graham, MSN, FNP-BC, Emory Heart and Vascular Center; Maria Piraner, MD, diagnostic radiologist, director of the Center for Breast Care at EJCH; and Patricia Yugueros, MD, chief of plastic surgery at EJCH, and will hold a panel discussion about trends in women’s health at 6 p.m. Doors will open to the Ladies’ Night Out event at 6:30 p.m.

Art program helps Winship patients heal at Emory Johns Creek Hospital

slide1The healing arts program at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University at Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) is helping patients in their fight against cancer.

Oncology patients are painting canvases to pass the time creatively during their infusion treatments.

Joseph Pollage says he’s received cancer care at Winship at EJCH for four months. Pollage says he enjoys the therapeutic art program and believes it can help patients.  “It distracts you so you don’t sit here and think about what’s happening, during your treatment,” Pollage says.

The nurse manager for Winship at EJCH, Nicole Bansavage, RN, says she’s seen first-hand the positive impact on patients.  “Most patients have never painted before and they’re surprised and proud by the quality of art work they produce,” Bansavage says.

Pollage says it’s not just the painting he enjoys, but the type of service you receive from the staff at Winship.

“It doesn’t matter which nurse you get …you receive great care from everyone here, and that really makes a difference.”

Virginia Lago, art therapist for the hospital’s program, says she’s seen patients who didn’t feel well from their treatments, but tried painting and left the hospital uplifted.  “I believe art can manifest healing for the patients,” Lago says

Lago says her job is more than just art, but about connecting with the patients.  “It’s really about the love you give to patients and the bond you build.”

Learn more about cancer care at Emory Johns Creek Hospital

cta-learn-blue

Emory Johns Creek Hospital to host annual 5K Scrub Run and Health Festival

scrub-run2015Emory Johns Creek Hospital will host its annual 5K Scrub Run and Community Health Festival on Saturday, May 14. The race starts at 8 a.m. and children 10 and under can participate in a 100-yard dash at 9 a.m.

The hospital will offer free health screenings including cholesterol, glucose, blood pressure, bone density, and body mass index (BMI) calculations at the health festival starting at 8 a.m. This year, the event will also feature the hospital’s da Vinci® Surgical System to show the public how robotic surgery works. Physicians will also be available to meet and greet community members.

WHO:

Emory Johns Creek Hospital and surrounding communities

WHAT:

Emory Johns Creek Hospital 5K Scrub Run and Community Health Festival

WHEN:

Saturday, May 14, 2016

TIME:

Race registration starts: 6:30 a.m.
5K run/walk starts: 8 a.m.
100-yard dash (ages 10 and under) starts: 9 a.m.
Health Festival starts: 8 -11 a.m.

WHERE:

Emory Johns Creek Hospital
6325 Hospital Parkway
Johns Creek, GA 30097

The health festival will take place in the parking lot outside of Physician’s Plaza, entrance C.

All proceeds will benefit the Chattahoochee High School Cross Country Teams and the Emory Johns Creek Hospital Foundation.

Register for the race on active.com.
• Registration for 5K is $25 now through May 13
• Race day registration is $35

Race results will be posted here.

New study uses cryoablation to reduce pain for cancer patients

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Kevin Makowski, RBP

A new study using cryoablation to decrease pain for patients who have cancer metastases in the bone is now underway throughout Emory Healthcare. Cryoablation is a process that uses extreme cold (cryo) to destroy or damage tissue (ablation).

Called the “Multicenter Study of Cryoablation for Palliation of Painful Bone Metastases”, or MOTION, the study aims to assess the effectiveness and safety of cryoablation therapy to treat patients with painful bone metastases and document the effects the procedure has on their condition.

The prospective, single-arm study will enroll 60 participants at eight centers in the U.S. and internationally. Twenty participants can enroll at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital. Participants will serve as their own control group in this one-year study.

The clinical trial examines self-reported pain scores from the patients. Investigators are assessing improvement in scores defined by more than a two-point reduction in the worst pain in the last 24 hours, using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), from before the cryoablation procedure to eight weeks after the procedure takes place. The trial will assess patients experiencing pain at a level of 4 or above on a scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (unimaginable pain).

The goal is to freeze cancerous cells and stop the pain signals to the brain. We use image guidance to insert the ablation probe into the middle of a painful cancer lesion. Then, we create an ablation zone by lowering the temperature to minus 40 degrees centigrade for 10 minutes.

Emory interventional radiologists freeze tumors in order to kill cancer cells in contact with the bone and reduce the size of the tumor. CT images obtained during the procedure helps doctors guide needles into the tumor.

Cryoablation provides an alternative for patients who haven’t experienced relief from current pain therapies. Many patients suffering from cancer pain take several medications to cope with the pain.

The outpatient cryoablation procedure takes about an hour.

Galil Medical is funding this clinical trial.

For more information about this study, contact the study coordinator, Maria Rivas at 404-712-7962.

Learn more about other available trials.  http://clinicaltrials.emory.edu/

Dr. J. David Prologo

J. David Prologo, MDdavid_prologo_photo, is an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at Emory’s School of Medicine, and director of Interventional Radiology Services at EJCH. Prologo is the principal site investigator for the MOTION study, and one of 10 subspecialty trained, board certified interventional radiologists at Emory.

Emory Johns Creek Hospital Offers State-of-the-Art Vein Illumination Technology

Vein IlluminationHave you ever gone to a physician’s office to have blood drawn only to be stuck three or four times to hit a vein? Or, when receiving an IV, have clinician had to search for a good vein because you are dehydrated? Emory Johns Creek Hospital has added new, innovative technology that greatly decreases the number of attempts needed to find a good vein for needle placements, making the process of drawing blood, starting intravenous solutions and other procedures easier on both the patient and clinician.

The vein illuminating device, made by AccuVein Inc., uses a visible laser to show a map of veins on the surface of a patient’s skin, which allows the clinician to choose veins that will offer the greatest chance of success for needle placement on the first try. Since the vein finder does not make contact with the skin, it is painless and easy to clean. It is also effective on a range of skin tones. Clinicians can dock the device on an easy-to-position mobile stand when they need to work hands free.

According to Lisa Aiken, RN, MSN, Nurse Educator for the Intensive Care Unit and Emergency Department, Emory Johns Creek uses the vein finder in several areas of the hospital, including the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) where veins in premature babies are very small and hard to find. It is also used in the Emergency Department and Outpatient Surgery.

Aiken explains that suitable veins are often more difficult to locate in patients who are dehydrated, overweight or diabetic. Veins are also harder to find in older patients, and Aiken adds, anxiety can make veins harder to find, which is often the case in people who are about to give blood or undergo a procedure. Though new to the hospital, Aiken says patients have already expressed appreciation and satisfaction with the new device.

For more information on this exciting new technology, please visit Emory Johns Creek Hospital at www.emoryjohnscreek.com or call 678-474-7000.

Emory Johns Creek Hospital continues Community Health Classes

Wellness ClassesLooking for a way to kick start a healthier lifestyle in the new year? A new 5-week course starts Feb. 25 at Emory Johns Creek Hospital focusing on health and wellness. Classes are taught by community and hospital healthcare providers and provide general education on nutrition and health issues to help participants progress toward developing personalized health plans.

Classes meet every other Wednesday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in Physicians Plaza Suite 109, located at 6335 Hospital Parkway in Johns Creek. The cost for all five sessions is $75. Class topics are:

  • Feb. 25: Introduction and Initial Health Screening. Taught by Andrew Pugliese, MD, a Disease Prevention Physician at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, will set the foundation with information on how a healthy, active lifestyle can influence personal risk factors for disease. Licensed lab technicians help participants complete a personalized physical health assessment.
  • March 04: Health Eating Habits and Their Effect on Chronic Disease Management. Julie Parish, an Emory Johns Creek registered and licensed dietitian, will provide disease specific diet education relevant to participant’s personal risk factors and demonstrate how to use a food diary to track progress.
  • Feb. 11: Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives. Emory Johns Creek Food Services Director, Amy Davis, will talk about organic and sustainable cooking tips and how to stock your kitchen to achieve dietary success. The class will also participate in a cooking demo and prep their own healthy dinner for four to take home.
  • March 18: Preventative Benefits of Exercise. Kay Halbert, Outpatient Rehabilitation Services Supervisor at Emory Johns Creek, discusses setting goals and general requirements for physical activity. Class participants can register to win a Fitbit to help track fitness and nutrition goals along with a pair of shoes from fleet feet and a gym membership with LA fitness.
  • March 25: Wrap-up with General Well-being. Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s Sleep Lab Coordinator and Registered Respiratory Therapist Joyce Neidert and Licensed Pharmacist Roland Tam. Discuss stress management with the Director of Marketing for Massage Envy Barb Hornsby. Class members can experience a free chair massage, take home a one hour session, and enter to win a custom pillow.

For more information or to register online, visit emoryjohnscreek.com/events-classes or call 678-474-8200 to register.

Emory Johns Creek Hospital Recognized as a Top Performer on Key Quality Measures

Joint Commission Top PerformerEmory Johns Creek Hospital is pleased to announce it has been recognized as a Top Performer on Key Quality Measures for 2013 by the Joint Commission, the leading accreditor of healthcare organizations in the United States.

The hospital has been recognized for achieving excellence in accountability measure performance for heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia and surgical care measure sets during 2013. It was one of 1,224 hospitals in the United States to achieve the 2013 Top Performer distinction.

“Emory Johns Creek Hospital is very proud of receiving Top Performer designation from The Joint Commission,” says Laura Lang, Director of Quality and Patient Safety at Emory Johns Creek. “It demonstrates our commitment to the highly reliable use of evidence-based interventions that increase the chances of healthy outcomes for our patients.”

To make the list, Emory Johns Creek Hospital had to meet three performance criteria based on 2013 accountability measure data, including:

  • Achieving cumulative performance of 95 percent or above across all reported accountability measures;
  • Achieving performance of 95 percent or above on each and every reported accountability measure where there were at least 30 denominator cases; and
  • Having at least one core measure set that had a composite rate of 95 percent or above, and (within that measure set) all applicable individual accountability measures had a performance rate of 95 percent or above.

Lang explains, “There has been a tremendous effort by staff, physicians, and administration to work collaboratively and establish the processes to deliver the right care at the right time. We will work to continuously improve this level of performance and work diligently on new quality measures.”

Emory Johns Creek Hospital, a 110-bed acute care hospital serving communities in Northeast Atlanta, provides immediate local access to more than 700 physicians in 54 specialties and is part of Emory Healthcare’s broad network of six hospitals, 1,800 physicians and 200 provider locations.

Other Emory hospitals recognized as Top Performers by the Joint Commission are Emory University Hospital, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods, formerly Emory Wesley Woods Geriatric Hospital. Emory University and Emory Saint Joseph’s were recognized for achieving excellence in accountability measure performance for heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia and surgical care measure sets. Emory Wesley Woods was recognized for achieving excellence in accountability measure performance for the hospital-based in-patient psych measure set.

For more information, visit the Joint Commision’s Top Performer program website.

5 Ways to Motivate Yourself to Exercise

exercise motivationWe know exercise can help us lose weight and will be better for our health in the long run, but we still can’t seem to get ourselves motivated to exercise for the recommended duration, frequency and intensity outlined by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Current guidelines recommend about 2.5 hours per week of moderately intense aerobic exercise (such as a brisk walk or jumping jacks) and at least 2 days a week of muscle-strengthening activity. Check out fitness guidelines for health as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and American Heart Association (AHA).

Here are 5 tips to help get yourself motivated to exercise:

  1. Break it down. The recommended 2.5 hours per week works out to about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. You can break that down further by doing three, 10-minute sessions each day. Remember to combine aerobic and muscle strengthening activities for optimal benefits.
  2. The power of one. The journey of 10,000 miles (or the loss of 30 pounds) begins with one step. Or pushup. Or lunge. If you’ve been inactive for a while or have old injuries, trying to pound out a 30-minute jog may be a setup for failure. Also, ask your physician about modified exercises to help ease into a new routine.
  3. Put it on your calendar. Set appointments with yourself and treat it as you would any other meeting or appointment.
  4. Phone a friend. Working out with your partner or friends will help make exercise more fun! Unfortunately, most of us are more willing to let ourselves down than others, so having a support system in the form of an exercise buddy will force you to keep yourself more accountable.
  5. Less trips to the doctor. According to the AHA, heart disease and stroke are the nation’s # 1 and # 5 killers, and exercising for the recommended amounts of time can improve your overall cardiovascular health and reduce your risk of a myriad of health issues. Trade in the time you’d spend at the doctor’s office for a few minutes of exercise!

Related Resources

References

American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Physical Activity Guidelines

5 Weeks to Better Wellness with Community Health Classes

Wellness ClassesLooking for a way to kick start a healthier lifestyle in the new year? Starting in January 2015, Emory Johns Creek Hospital will launch a five-week course of health and wellness classes taught by community and hospital healthcare providers. The classes focus on providing general education on nutrition and health issues to help participants progress toward developing personalized health plans. Classes meet every other Wednesday from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The first class meets Jan. 7, 2015 in Physicians Plaza Suite 109, located at 6335 Hospital Parkway in Johns Creek. The cost for all five sessions is $75. Class topics are:

  • Jan. 7:  Introduction and Initial Health Screening. Taught by Andrew Pugliese, MD, a Disease Prevention Physician at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, will set the foundation with information on how a healthy, active lifestyle can influence personal risk factors for disease. Licensed lab technicians help participants complete a personalized physical health assessment.
  • Jan. 21:  Healthy Eating Habits and Their Effect on Chronic Disease Management. Julie Parish, an Emory Johns Creek registered and licensed dietitian, will provide disease specific diet education relevant to participant’s personal risk factors and demonstrate how to use a food diary to track progress.
  • Feb. 4: Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives. Emory Johns Creek Food Services Director, Amy Davis, will talk about organic and sustainable cooking tips and how to stock your kitchen to achieve dietary success. The class will also participate in a cooking demo and prep their own healthy dinner for four to take home.
  • Feb. 18: Preventative Benefits of Exercise. Kay Halbert, Outpatient Rehabilitation Services Supervisor at Emory Johns Creek, discusses setting goals and general requirements for physical activity. Class participants can register to win a Fitbit to help track fitness and nutrition goals along with a pair of shoes from fleet feet and a gym membership with LA fitness.
  • March 4: Wrap-up with General Well-being. Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s Sleep Lab Coordinator and Registered Respiratory Therapist Joyce Neidert and Licensed Pharmacist Roland Tam. Discuss stress management with the Director of Marketing for Massage Envy Barb Hornsby. Class members can experience a free chair massage, take home a one hour session, and enter to win a custom pillow.

For more information or to register online, visit emoryjohnscreek.com/events-classes or call 678-474-8200.

6 Flu Myths Busted – Should I Still Get My Flu Shot This Year?

Flu MythPrevention is the best medicine, and it’s particularly true for the flu. While an annual flu vaccination is still one of the best defenses against this highly contagious respiratory illness, myths and misinformation keep many people from getting vaccinated. Here’s our list of responses to the top six flu vaccine myths, but we also urge you to speak to your doctor or healthcare professional about flu vaccination and prevention.

  1. The CDC just announced this year’s flu shot won’t be that effective, so why bother? According to the Centers for Disease Control’s Dec. 4 announcement, the flu vaccine’s ability to protect against a certain strain of seasonal flu viruses, called influenza A H3N2, may be reduced this year because of changes in the viruses since this year’s vaccine was produced. There are three things to keep in mind, however. According to the CDC, a similar situation occurred during the 2007-2008 flu season and the vaccine still proved to be 37 to 42 percent effective against H3N2 viruses. This year’s vaccination can still reduce the severity of symptoms if people do become infected. And while H3N2 viruses have been the mostly commonly reported so far this season, other types of flu viruses may become more prevalent.
  2. The flu shot will give you the flu. Not true. Flu vaccines contain inactive or weakened flu viruses that cannot cause infection. Since the flu vaccine takes about two weeks to kick in, it’s likely that some people who get the flu shot and then start experiencing flu-like symptoms were already coming down with a cold or flu. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) cites studies in which subjects were given either a flu shot or a salt-water injection. In both groups, the number of subjects who reported flu-like symptoms after the either shot were roughly the same.
  3. It’s better to get the flu and let my body fight the infection. In reality, the influenza virus is a very serious infectious disease. According to the website flu.gov, approximately 5 to 20% of the U.S. population gets the flu, and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized each year for flu-related complications, such as bacterial pneumonia, dehydration or the worsening of chronic pre-existing conditions, such as asthma. During the past 30 years, flu-related deaths have ranged from 3,000 to 49,000 per year. Older people, young children, pregnant women are at higher risk for developing severe flu complications.
  4. It’s too late to get the flu shot. Nope. In fact, National Influenza Vaccination Week runs Dec. 7 though 13, even though flu season generally begins in the fall, starting in October, and can last through May. Keep in mind that flu season typically peaks in January and February, and the vaccines are effective as long as the flu viruses are in circulation.
  5. Women who are pregnant shouldn’t get the flu shot. In actuality, the flu shot is the best protection against seasonal flu for pregnant women. Since pregnancy changes women’s immune systems, they are more susceptible to catching the flu virus, and the flu shot can protect your baby before and after the birth. While the flu shot is recommended, the nasal spray is not. As always during pregnancy, seek your doctor’s advice.
  6. The flu shot doesn’t work. I had one and still got sick. While this situation can happen, it’s possible that people who get the flu even after getting vaccinated may have caught a strain of the flu not included in that year’s vaccination or the virus changed, or may have gotten infected before the antibodies were created. Another reason is the word flu has been used to describe a variety of illnesses that aren’t caused by the influenza virus. Rhinoviruses, which are the culprit behind the common cold, can cause similar symptoms, and we tend to use the words cold and the flu interchangeably.

Related Resources

When Should You Go to the ER?
Transplant Patients: Protect Yourself Against the Flu
Did You Know that Getting the Flu Shot Can Also Lower Your Risk of a Heart Attack?