Posts Tagged ‘ED’

When Should You Go to the ER?

While some health conditions do not require emergency care, many do.

Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) wants the residents of our community to understand when it is best to seek care from the emergency department and when they can wait to see their primary care physicians.

“In many cases, patients are confused about what constitutes an emergency,” explains Arthur Griffiths, MD, FACEP, senior staff physician and community liaison in the Emergency Department at EJCH. “While many minor medical issues such as earaches and sore throats can generally be handled by a primary care physician’s office or walk-in clinic, a variety of conditions absolutely require emergency care.”

The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) has identified 10 medical conditions that warrant a 911 call or a trip to the emergency room:

• Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
• Chest or upper-abdominal pain or pressure
• Fainting, sudden dizziness, weakness or lack of mobility
• Changes in vision
• Confusion or changes in mental status
• Any sudden or severe pain
• Uncontrolled bleeding
• Severe or persistent vomiting or diarrhea
• Coughing or vomiting blood
• Suicidal or homicidal thoughts or feelings

“If you are unsure of what to do in a certain situation, either call your primary care physician’s office or the Emergency Department for guidance,” says Dr. Griffiths. “I encourage patients to trust their instincts if they feel unsure. While we hope you never have a reason to visit the Emergency Department at Emory Johns Creek Hospital, we want you to know that our team of experts is here 24 hours a day, seven days a week, ready to deliver high-quality emergency care to our patients.”

For more information about the EJCH Emergency Department, or for a downloadable version of ACEP’s list of 10 medical conditions that warrant a trip to the emergency room, click here!

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Emory Johns Creek Hospital Emergency Department

During a Heart Attack, Every Minute Counts

Emory Johns Creek HospitalFor heart attack victims, every minute counts. Most people who die from a heart attack die within two hours of the first sign. Heart attacks occur when a coronary artery is blocked, preventing oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart. Every minute that the cardiac tissue goes without oxygen results in more damage to the heart muscle – hence the saying “time is muscle.” The key is to get the blocked artery opened as fast as possible, to prevent further damage to the heart muscle and improve chances for survival.

At Emory Johns Creek Hospital, heart attack patients undergo angioplasty to open blocked arteries in our onsite, state-of-the-art Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, featuring the latest technology, including fiber optic intra-aortic balloon pump and intravascular ultrasound. During angioplasty, an interventional cardiologist threads a balloon catheter into the artery to the blockage and inflates the balloon, pushing the blockage aside and restoring blood flow. The balloon is then deflated and withdrawn, and a stent may be inserted to keep the vessel open.

Clinical guidelines recommend that acute heart attack patients undergo angioplasty within 90 minutes of arrival in the emergency room. Our door-to-balloon times are superior to the national average, and, as part of Emory Healthcare, we can quickly collaborate with colleagues within the system to provide cardiothoracic (CT) surgery back-up when necessary.

If you suspect you may be having a heart attack, call for emergency help immediately. Some signs of a heart attack include a feeling of pressure or a squeezing pain in the center of your chest that lasts for more than a few minutes; pain that extends beyond your chest to your shoulder, arm, back, or even to your teeth and jaw; and shortness of breath, fatigue, clamminess, and nausea.

To learn more about the physicians who save lives every day at Emory Johns Creek Hospital’s Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, visit emoryjohnscreek.com/cathlab.

Exercise May Enhance Sexual Function in Men

Exercise Men's Sexual Health Erectile DysfunctionMen under the age of 40 now have one more reason to hit the gym. According to a recent Emory University study, increased physical activity is associated with better sexual function in men under 40.

The study, published online in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, assessed the association between physical activity and erectile function in young, healthy men ages 18 to 40. Previous studies have suggested that erectile dysfunction in men under 40 is correlated with increased cardiovascular risks.

“The men in our study who exercised more seemed to experience a protective benefit against erectile dysfunction,” says Wayland Hsiao, MD, co-author of the study and assistant professor of urology, Emory University School of Medicine. “We hope that early screening for ED may be a gateway issue to help motivate young men to live healthily on a consistent basis so that they can possibly avoid health issues associated with a sedentary lifestyle, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We see this as just the beginning.”

For the study, a group of men ages 18 to 40 kept a record of their exercise and sexual function. Researchers found improved erectile function in men under 40 with increased exercise, as well as higher rates of sexual dysfunction in sedentary men under 40. The study also noted that men can start experiencing issues with erectile dysfunction as early as their 30s.

“Several studies have evaluated the relationship between exercise and erectile function in older or obese men,” says study co-author Chad W.M. Ritenour, MD, director of the Emory’s Men’s Health Center and associate professor of urology, Emory University School of Medicine. “Our goal with this particular study was to determine if there is a connection between increased exercise and better erectile function in younger men.”

Drs. Ritenour and Hsiao recommend that men follow the recommendations of the CDC and get at least two and a half hours of physical activity a week, ideally spread throughout the week. Also, men should eat a diet that includes variety of fruits and vegetables, as well as limit foods and drinks high in calories, sugar, salt, fat and alcohol.

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