Posts Tagged ‘diabetes’

Healthy Holiday Eating Tips

5 Healthy Eating Tips for the Holidays

Family enjoying Thanksgiving dinnerYour recipe for staying on track no matter what’s cooking.

‘Tis the season for family, festivity, and food—lots of food. Temptations are everywhere, and parties and travel disrupt daily routines. What’s more, it all goes on for weeks.

How do you stick to your diabetes meal plan when everyone around you seems to be splurging? Here are 5 tips that can help:

1. Holiday-Proof Your Plan

You may not be able to control what food you’re served, and you’re bound to see other people eating a lot of tempting treats. Meet the challenges armed with a plan:

  • Eat close to your usual times to keep your blood sugar steady. If your meal is served later than normal, eat a small snack at your usual mealtime and eat a little less when dinner is served.
  • Invited to a party? Offer to bring a healthy dish along.
  • If you have a sweet treat, cut back on other carbs (like potatoes and bread) during the meal.
  • Don’t skip meals to save up for a feast. It will be harder to keep your blood sugar in control, and you’ll be really hungry and more likely to overeat.
  • If you slip up, get right back to healthy eating with your next meal.

Holiday Hacks

  • Have pumpkin pie instead of pecan pie. Even with a dollop of whipped cream, you’ll cut calories and sugar by at least a third.
  • Break physical activity up into smaller chunks so it fits into your schedule, like walking 10 minutes several times a day.
  • Schedule some “me” time every day—a nap, dog walk, or hot bath to get your energy back for the next celebration.

2. Outsmart the Buffet

When you face a spread of delicious holiday food, make healthy choices easier:

  • Have a small plate of the foods you like best and then move away from the buffet table.
  • Start with vegetables to take the edge off your appetite.
  • Eat slowly. It takes at least 20 minutes for your brain to realize you’re full.
  • Avoid or limit alcohol. If you do have an alcoholic drink, have it with food. Alcohol can lower blood sugar and interact with diabetes medicines.

Also plan to stay on top of your blood sugar. Check it more often during the holidays, and if you take medicine, ask your doctor if the amount needs to be adjusted.

3. Fit in Favorites

No food is on the naughty list. Choose the dishes you really love and can’t get any other time of year, like Aunt Edna’s pumpkin pie. Slow down and savor a small serving, and make sure to count it in your meal plan.

Family walking in park

If you plan for it, no food needs to be on the naughty list.

4. Keep Moving

You’ve got a lot on your plate this time of year, and physical activity can get crowded out. But being active is your secret holiday weapon; it can help make up for eating more than usual and reduce stress during this most stressful time of year. Get moving with friends and family, such as taking a walk after a holiday meal.

5. Get Your Zzz’s

Going out more and staying out later often means cutting back on sleep. Sleep loss can make it harder to control your blood sugar, and when you’re sleep deprived you’ll tend to eat more and prefer high-fat, high-sugar food. Aim for 7 to 8 hours per night to guard against mindless eating.

Most of all, remember what the season is about—celebrating and connecting with the people you care about. When you focus more on the fun, it’s easier to focus less on the food.

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Emory Healthcare

At Emory Healthcare, we’re here to help you find the care you need, when you need it. With more than 2,800 doctors and 300 locations, including 11 hospitals, primary care offices, urgent cares and MinuteClinics, we’re delivering specialized care across the region. Find a doctor near you to schedule your annual screenings and exams.

Foot Care for Seniors: 10 Important Tips

Proper foot care is essential for older adults to help prevent injuries, falls and complications from chronic conditions like diabetes.Proper foot care is essential for older adults because it can help prevent injuries, falls and complications from chronic diseases like diabetes. Learn how to properly care for your feet so they can continue to take you wherever you need to go.

1. Be good to your soles. As you age, the muscle tissue in your feet can thin and your nerves may not work effectively. This can lead to loss of feeling in your feet (neuropathy). Use a long-handled mirror – it will extend your reach several inches – to see what you may not feel. Examine the soles of your feet and in-between your toes every day for cuts, blisters, sores or any areas of skin breakdown from moisture. This is especially important if you have diabetes.

2. Choose the right footwear. Wearing the right footwear can help you keep your balance, prevent falls and reduce the risk of blisters and other injuries. Never purchase shoes that rub or slide around on your heel as you walk – this is a common way to develop blisters that can become more serious sores. Also avoid shoes that are too tight, slick on the bottom, have high heels or pointy toes.

If you have diabetes or neuropathy, talk with your doctor about prescription orthodics (supports or devices worn in your shoes). You may be eligible for custom othodics partially covered by Medicare.

3. Get the right fit. Here are a few suggestions:
• Visit the shoe store in the afternoon when your feet are slightly swollen from daily activities.
• Have a sales associate measure your feet so you can select the correct size. It’s normal for your feet to change sizes slightly as you age.
• Choose the shoe size that fits your larger foot (it’s common to have one foot that’s bigger than the other).
• Always try on shoes before you buy them to make sure they fit. A good rule of thumb: your toes should be half an inch from the tips of your shoes when you are standing.

4. Barefoot isn’t better. When going outdoors, always wear shoes (preferably closed-toe shoes) to prevent cuts, scrapes and falls. It’s also best to wear shoes as much as possible while indoors to protect your feet.

5. Keep your toenails in tip-top shape. Trimming your toenails correctly (straight across and no shorter than the tip of your toe) is key for preventing ingrown toenails. If you have diabetes or trouble reaching your feet, see a podiatrist (a physician who specializes in foot care), not a nail salon technician, for regular medical pedicures and nail trimming.

6. Get the blood flowing. As you age, you may have decreased blood circulation to your feet. To promote healthy circulation:
• Prop up your feet on a stool or couch when sitting down
• Wiggle your toes when you sit for long periods of time
• Stretch daily
• Give yourself regular foot massages
And, if you smoke, now’s the time to quit. Smoking can affect good circulation in the body.

7. Keep your feet dry. Change your socks regularly and make sure your feet aren’t damp from sweat or a shower before putting on your shoes.

8. …But not too dry. Keep your feet moisturized to prevent cracking, itching and calluses. Stick with gentle soap and apply cream or lotion daily after your shower or bath.

9. Fight fungal infections. Prevent athlete’s foot by wearing shoes that fit properly, changing your socks or stockings daily (or whenever they become damp) and applying foot powder each day. If you experience itching or burning, see your podiatrist for treatment.

10. Visit your podiatrist regularly for foot checks. Your podiatrist can catch problems like bone spurs, hammertoe, neuromas, bunions, warts, ingrown toenails or wounds before they cause more serious problems.

Would you like to find a podiatrist near you? Yes, I’d like to find one now. 

Aging Parents and Multiple Health Problems – What Adult Children Can Do to Help

aging-parents-emailAs we age, the likelihood of developing multiple ongoing conditions increases. These problems can include high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and congestive heart failure, to name a few.

Multiple medical conditions also means multiple prescriptions, therapies and physicians, all of which can become confusing. Sometimes, they might seem at cross purposes as well.

Join us July 27, 2016, from noon to 1 p.m. to chat online with Anthony Nguyen, MD, Emory Healthcare Regional Medical Officer for the Emory Coordinated Care Centers, part of the Emory Healthcare Network Advantage program. Dr. Nguyen works with Emory primary care physicians and Coordinated Care Center staff to deliver continuous coordinated care to older patients.

He will discuss how caregivers – and patients themselves- can communicate with their doctors to help manage health conditions like

  • High Blood Pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Anticoagulation Therapy Program
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • COPD

He will also explain the therapies, services and treatments offered at the Coordinated Care Centers that can help with this more intensive health management, including:

  • HealthStart assessments
  • Fall prevention
  • Medication management
  • Nutrition advice
  • Smoking cessation programs
  • Behavioral health support

During this chat, you’ll be able to ask questions and get real-time answers from Dr. Nguyen. Register now for our July 27 chat at emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

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