Posts Tagged ‘american heart association’

Emory Hospitals Recognized by American Heart Association for Excellence in Heart Attack Care

mission lifelineThe American Heart Association has recognized four Emory Healthcare hospitals and one Emory Healthcare-affiliated hospital through its Mission: Lifeline program for excellence in heart attack care.

American Heart Association’s Mission: Lifeline award recognizes a hospital’s commitment and success in implementing a higher standard of STEMI (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) care by ensuring that STEMI patients receive treatment according to nationally accepted standards and recommendations. The goal of the program is to reduce system barriers to prompt treatment for heart attacks. This includes the initial 9-1-1 call and continues with hospital treatment.

Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory University Hospital and Emory Johns Creek Hospital all received the 2015 American Heart Association Mission: Lifeline Gold Receiving Center award. Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Southern Regional Medical Center have achieved the 2015 Mission: Lifeline Bronze Receiving Center award. Emory University Hospital and Emory University Hospital Midtown were the first in Georgia to be accredited as Mission: Lifeline Receiving Centers.

The Gold Receiving Center award recognizes hospitals for achieving 85 percent or greater overall composite score for all Mission: Lifeline STEMI quality achievement indicators, with no single measure below 75 percent, for consecutive 24-month intervals. The Bronze recognition designates hospitals that have achieved 85 percent or greater overall composite score for all Mission: Lifeline STEMI quality achievement indicators, with no single measure below 75 percent, for consecutive 90-day intervals.

Each year, more than half a million Americans experience ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), out-of-hospital cardiac arrest or both. The majority of these patients fail to receive appropriate treatment for their life-threatening conditions within recommended timeframes. To prevent death, it is critical to immediately restore blood flow, either by opening the blocked vessel with balloon angioplasty and/or stenting, or by giving clot-busting medication.

“The recognition that these five hospitals have earned reflects the outstanding STEMI care that is delivered in every setting, including pre-hospital, emergency department, cath lab and inpatient areas,” says Michael Ross, MD, professor of emergency medicine, founder and immediate past co-chair of the Atlanta Mission: Lifeline program. “Our health system has clearly emerged as a leader in STEMI care in the greater metro Atlanta area, and a number of our physicians, nurses and allied health staff have leadership positions within Atlanta’s STEMI system of care. Emory Healthcare hospitals, physicians and staff continuously strive to provide the best possible care to all patients.

For more information on Mission: Lifeline, visit heart.org/missionlifeline and heart.org/quality.

Read the article from the Emory News Center.

Enhancing AHA STEMI Treatment Guidelines When Every Minute Counts

AHA STEMI Treatment GuidelinesFor heart attack victims, every minute counts- hence the saying “time is muscle.” Experts say victims of heart attacks have better outcomes with rapid intervention to open and unclog their blocked arteries, and clinical guidelines recommend that acute heart attack patients undergo treatment within 90 minutes of arrival in the emergency room.

Recently, Emory University Hospital (EUH), Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUHM), Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) and Saint Joseph’s Hospital–all four participating Emory hospitals–received the American Heart Association Mission Lifeline Bronze Recognition award for excellence in STEMI (ST-elevation myocardial infarction) heart attack care for 2012.

A STEMI heart attack, the most severe form of heart attack, is caused when a blood clot suddenly forms, completely blocking an artery in the heart. This can result in damage that covers a large area of the heart and extends deep into the heart muscle, which is why rapid treatment is a priority to save as much heart muscle as possible. STEMI heart attack treatment options consist of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), which includes both angioplasty and stenting; clot-busting medication; and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG).

Emory hospitals, like many other hospitals, have long participated in the “Door to Balloon time within 90 minutes” performance measure for STEMIs. Since Emory was hitting this target nearly 100% of the time, the team decided that wasn’t good enough. They decided to raise the bar for patients coming in via ambulance by starting the clock at time of “first medical contact” with the paramedics, instead of when they arrived at the hospital’s doorstep.

“We thought the clock needed to start ticking when EMS arrived and assessed the patient in the field for a STEMI,” says Abhinav Goyal, MD, MHS, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Emory, and director of quality for cardiology at EUH and EUHM. “Therefore, we began re-working the process with the AHA, making sure that EMS vehicles were equipped with ECG machines and all EMS personnel were trained to obtain and interpret field ECGs.” Goyal is also co-chair of the Atlanta Mission Lifeline Data Quality Subcommittee.

“It took about three years for Emory hospitals to achieve a 95 percent success rate in the Door-to-Balloon metric when we committed to it seven to eight years ago,” explains Michael Ross, Michael Ross, MD, professor of emergency medicine at Emory and co-chair of the Atlanta Mission: Lifeline Program. “But our successes came much quicker with the new First Medical Contact to Balloon performance measure. This is a true testament to the dedication and commitment of the Emory Healthcare system.”

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What is the Difference Between a Heart Attack and Stroke?

Although the risks and effects can be similar, heart attacks and stroke are two different medical problems with different symptoms. While both are vascular events, meaning they involve the blood vessels, mainly the arteries, they affect different organs in the body. However, for both heart attack and stoke victims, every minute counts!

Heart attacks occur when a coronary artery is blocked, usually as a result of progressive coronary artery disease (CAD). With CAD, plaque builds up in the arteries preventing oxygen-rich blood from reaching the heart. Every minute that the cardiac tissue goes without oxygen results in more damage to the heart muscle – hence the saying “time is muscle.” The key is to get the blocked artery opened as fast as possible, to prevent further damage to the heart muscle and improve chances for survival.

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States . A stroke is a “brain attack”, and occurs when a blood vessel carrying oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot, or bursts. When that happens, brain cells in the part of the brain that cannot get blood begin to die. Stroke treatment is most effective when given within the first few hours after a stroke has occurred, so it’s important to recognize the symptoms and act quickly.

Heart attack and stroke risk factors

Although heart attack and stroke are different, the risk factors are the same for both:

– Smoking
– High blood pressure
– High cholesterol
– Diabetes
– Sedentary lifestyle
– Family history
– Atrial fibrillation (abnormal heart rhythm)

Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack vs. Stroke

Heart Attack

  • Chest Pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Discomfort in arms, back, neck, jaw or upper stomach
  • Nausea
  • Sleep problems
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of energy

Stroke

  • Face drooping — Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven?
  • Arm weakness — Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • Speech difficulty — Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like “The sky is blue.” Is the sentence repeated correctly?
  • Time to call 9-1-1 — If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately. Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared.

Do you know how to recognize stroke symptoms and when to “Act F.A.S.T.“? Are you familiar with the symptoms of a heart attack?

Emory Hospital First in Atlanta to Earn Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification

Joint Commission Stroke Center Certification

Congratulations to Emory University Hospital who recently joined an elite group of fewer than 30 centers nationwide with its Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification from The Joint Commission and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association! Emory University Hospital is the only hospital in metropolitan Atlanta to earn this designation and just one of two in Georgia. Comprehensive Stroke Center Certification recognizes only those hospitals that have state-of-the-art infrastructure, staff and training to receive and treat patients with the most complex strokes. Emory University Hospital underwent a rigorous onsite review by The Joint Commission in February 2013.

So, what does this all mean for you? It means that our Emory University Hospital stroke team provides advanced care, including:

  • A state-of-the-art neurointensive care unit, created especially for critically ill stroke patients
  • Neurosurgical interventions for complex conditions that can arise in stroke patients
  • Advanced imaging capabilities
  • Fellowship-trained neurointensivists available 24/7, ready to perform vascular procedures if needed
  • Access to a multidisciplinary team of specialists, including board-certified fellowship-trained stroke neurologists, world-renowned vascular neurosurgeons, highly skilled and experienced interventional neuroradiologists, a board-Certified and fellowship trained neurocritical care team and diagnostic neuroradiologists
  • Thirty-four neurocritical-care unit beds, six neuro step-down or intermediate-care beds and 41 acute-care floor beds

Emory Stroke Center CertificationThe Emory Stroke Center team provides 24/7 coverage and receives early warning about a patient arriving with stroke symptoms. This early notification ensures rapid assessment and stabilization, and an immediate CT brain scan to establish onset time and to determine eligibility for various treatment options.

Stroke is a disease that affects the arteries leading to and within the brain. According to the American Stroke Association, stroke is the number four cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the United States. Immediate treatment is essential when someone is having a stroke to reduce the effects and potential for permanent disability. Not close to Emory when an emergency strikes? Nearly half of our patients are transferred from other hospitals, and most of those arrive via helicopter. The Emory Healthcare system also has three Primary Stroke Centers accredited by The Joint Commission, including Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Saint Joseph’s Hospital.

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