News

Ebola and Emory Healthcare – An Extraordinary Year

kent brantly

Photo by: Jack Kearse

This August marks the first anniversary of Ebola care at Emory, and it was an extraordinary year!

Emory’s experience with Ebola began at the end of July 2014 when two American citizens became infected with the Ebola virus while providing humanitarian aid in West Africa. Both patients, Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, were brought to Emory University Hospital and discharged a month later free of the virus.

To date, the Emory Healthcare Ebola Team has successfully treated four patients infected with the Ebola virus. Emory is now an international leader in researching the disease. Our experts have shared their protocols and knowledge gained from treating these patients through a variety of journal publications, training conferences and an extensive public website for health care organizations regarding best practices for safe and effective screening, diagnosis and treatment of Ebola virus disease. Emory is also leading the new National Ebola Training and Education Center (NETEC), in collaboration with the University of Nebraska Medical Center and the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (Bellevue Hospital).

A year later, Emory Healthcare Chief Nursing Executive Susan Grant’s words stand out as a representation of the hard work of our staff over the past year and the hard work that is still yet to come: “We can either let our actions be guided by misunderstandings, fear and self-interest, or we can lead by knowledge, science and compassion. We can fear, or we can care.”
Watch the video below for more highlights:

Check out these other great resources for more on Emory and Ebola:

Interactive Timeline
Emory and Ebola Storify
Emory marks first anniversary of Ebola care – Press Release
Emory Ebola team recounts experience, lessons in treating first U.S. patients
In memoir, Kent Brantly reflects on Ebola care at Emory
Ebola in the Eye: Ian Crozier’s Story- VIDEO
Emory and Ebola – YouTube Video Playlist

Breakthrough clinical study exposes crucial role parents play in behavior management for children with autism

parent-childHighlighted in an April issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a clinical trial involving Emory University and the Marcus Autism Center provided insight into the effect parent training has on managing disruptive behavior with young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and serious behavioral problems.

ASD is a chronic condition beginning in early childhood and is mostly characterized by impaired social communication and repetitive behavior. Commonly, severe behavioral problems accompany ASD in young children including tantrums, aggression, self-injury and severe noncompliance in response to routine environmental demands. For parents of children with ASD, these disruptive behaviors can be overwhelming and produce uncertainty on how to handle these problems. While there are approved medications for these disruptive behavioral problems, many parents are often reluctant to use medication.

In the multi-location study, 180 children (age 3 to 7 years) with ASD and serious behavioral problems were randomly assigned to either 24 weeks of parent training or 24 weeks of parent education. The study aimed to measure the effect of parent training in managing disruptive behaviors versus basic parent education. The following provides more detail on the difference between the two groups:

  • Parent training provided parents with specific/ practical skills and techniques for how to manage serious behavioral problems.
  • Parent education offered useful information on autism – but did not provide guidance on how to manage serious behavioral problems.

Study results were documented by both parents of the participating children, as well a clinician who was blind to treatment assignment:

  • Parent ratings: after 24 weeks of treatment, children in the parent-training group showed a 48 percent improvement on disruptive behavior compared to a 32 percent decline for parent education.
  • Clinician ratings: at week 24, 70 percent of children in the parent-training group showed a positive response, compared to 40 percent for parent education.

“This is the largest randomized trial of any behavioral intervention in children with autism spectrum disorder, and it shows that parent training works,” notes Lawrence Scahill, MSN, PhD, professor of pediatrics at Marcus and Emory School of Medicine, who directed the study.

Overall study results: while children in both groups improved, parent training was more effective in reducing disruptive and aggressive behavior than parent education. In fact, the benefits of parent training continued for up to six months after the clinical trial, demonstrating the benefits of parent training last over time.

Despite the increased methods for recognizing ASD in young children, rigorous testing and the distribution of evidenced-based treatments have lagged. Using the results of this study, researchers and physicians are able to show the impact of parent training and disseminate learned practices to a wider population.

To find an autism-related clinical trial at Emory, click the “Search for a clinical trial at Emory” link and type in the terms “Autism” and “Emory” into the search field.

Emory hospitals again ranked among best in country, state and metro area by U.S. News & World Report

euh-frontU.S. News & World Report has announced its 2015-16 rankings of America’s Best Hospitals and once again, our Emory Healthcare hospitals have been placed among the best in the country. For the fourth year in a row, Emory University Hospital has been named the number one hospital in both Georgia and metro Atlanta. Emory University Hospital includes Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods and Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital.

Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital is ranked 5th in Georgia and 3rd in metro Atlanta. Emory University Hospital Midtown ranks 11th in Georgia in a two-way tie and 5th in metro Atlanta, also a two-way tie.

NATIONALLY, Emory University Hospital was TOP ranked in 12 adult specialty areas:

• Cancer – (#22 up from #24)
• Cardiology & Heart Surgery – (#15 up from #16)
• Diabetes & Endocrinology (#18 up from #23)
• Ear, Nose & Throat – (#45)
• Gastroenterology & GI Surgery – (#40 up from #41)
• Geriatrics – (#20 up from #21)
• Gynecology – (#26 up from #42)
• Nephrology – (#42)
• Neurology & Neurosurgery (#12 up from #15)
• Ophthalmology – (#12 up from #14)
• Orthopaedics – #31
• Urology – (#22 up from #25)

Emory University Hospital also ranked high performing in pulmonology. Emory University Hospital Midtown ranked high performing in cancer.

“We are proud of our rankings throughout our system in this year’s U.S. News & World Report’s Best Hospitals issue,” says Michael J. Mandl, president and CEO of Emory Healthcare. “More importantly, we are proud of the people who deliver excellence, quality and safety in health care to our patients and their families every day.”

U.S. News & World Report began publishing their “Best Hospital” rankings twenty-five years ago to identify the best medical centers for the most complex patients — those whose illnesses pose unusual challenges because of underlying conditions, procedure difficulty or other medical issues that add risk. Rankings are based on performance in several primary areas of health care: structure, process, outcomes and hospital reputation.

The rankings have been published at http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals and will appear in print in the U.S. News Best Hospitals 2015-16 guidebook, available on newsstands on September 1.

Emory Metabolic Camp Helps Young Women Manage Metabolic Disorders

This summer marked the 21st annual Metabolic Camp hosted by Emory University. This camp helps girls and young women with inherited metabolic disorders, including phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), learn how to better manage and live with their disorders. Metabolic Camp provides the girls with educational opportunities for handling the lifetime responsibility of managing their diets and health along with traditional camping activities.

These disorders are caused by the body’s inability to process proteins normally. In individuals with these rare genetic disorders even one gram of protein can cause irreversible brain damage or death. However through Georgia’s newborn screening program, metabolic disorders can often be detected early on.

“Metabolic Camp has had a tremendous impact not only on the quality of life of girls over the years but also on the outcome of the next generation of their children,” says Rani Singh, PhD, RD, camp director and director of Emory’s Genetics Metabolic Nutrition Program. “Most of these girls can’t attend other camps because of their special dietary needs, and this allows them to interact with others with their conditions and feel less isolated, while learning things that can save their lives and the lives of their future children.”

People with these disorders must learn as children to stick to a special diet of fruits and vegetables along with their specialized medical formula, and they are able to live normal lives if they adhere to this routine. It is important for females to follow specialized diets before and throughout pregnancy in order to avoid maternal PKU (MPKU) and prevent mental disabilities in their children. Emory University Metabolic Camp helps these girls and young women understand the importance of these diets and learn how to fit it into their everyday life.

The Emory University Metabolic Camp allows young women to be around others that can understand what they are going through and show them that they are not alone. The camp helps them learn skills and gain knowledge that will help them throughout a lifetime of managing and living with their disorder.

Metabolic Camp is a collaboration between the Atlanta Clinical and Translational Science Institute(ACTSI) and the Department of Human Genetics at Emory University Medicine.

For more information about Emory University Metabolic Camp visit the Emory News Center.

Congratulations to Emory’s 2015 Atlanta Top Doctors

Emory Top Docs 2015As our Emory Healthcare family continues to grow, so too does our ability to provide Atlanta and Georgia residents access to more Top Doctors. Atlanta magazine’s 2015 July issue features the annual listing of Top Doctors in the metro Atlanta area. We are proud to announce that of all the health systems represented in the listing, Emory physicians make up the majority – 58% to be exact!

We honor, celebrate and thank all of our physicians—and the care teams that support them—for truly making patient- and family-centered care their priority, and caring for YOU – our patients and families – each and every day. Congratulations to you all!

With our continuing expanded footprint, communities all over Atlanta and throughout Georgia have access to even more Emory Top Doctors. Big or small, major or minor, if you have a reason to seek medical care, you now have an Emory Healthcare facility and an Emory Healthcare Network physician close to home.

Find a Top Doctor near you at emoryhealthcare.org/topdocs!

 

Dirt Does Good: From Construction Site to Soccer Field

Emory Sustainable ConstructionAs you can imagine, digging space for a nine-level, 450,000-square-foot building with 500 underground parking spaces kicks up a lot of dirt! To continue all sustainability efforts with the new bed tower construction on Clifton Campus, the construction team set a goal to find another organization that could use the dirt that was displaced during the site expansion. As luck would have it, they found a most deserving recipient!

Multiple dump trucks hauled 78,000 cubic yards of dirt and filling material from the Emory University Hospital expansion site to Clarkston, GA. The dirt will be used to construct a soccer field at the Fugees Academy, the nation’s only school dedicated to refugee education. Fugees Family, Inc., is a non-profit organization devoted to working with child survivors of war. The organization’s efforts include year-round soccer for 90 boys and girls ages 10-18, after-school tutoring, soccer for 50 elementary-aged students, an academic enrichment summer camp and the Fugees Academy.

A.L. Grading Contractors, Inc., imported and placed the dirt at the site, while Breedlove Land Planning provided engineering services, which together would have cost more than $1 million. In the spirit of assisting Fugees Family in its philanthropic endeavor of providing recreational and learning opportunities for the refugee children residing in the Clarkston area, A.L. Grading’s lump sum fee was just $1.00.

Stay up to date on construction updates at emoryhealthcare.org/expansion!

Emory Healthcare Named One of Atlanta’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For™

Best and BrightestWe’re delighted to announce that for the third year in a row, Emory Healthcare has been named one of Atlanta’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For™ by the National Association for Business Resources (NABR)!

This award recognizes organizations that provide excellent benefits, compensation, employee engagement and retention, employee education and development, communication and shared vision, diversity and inclusion, work-life balance, community initiatives, and strategic company performance.

“We are honored to recognize the efforts of this year’s ‘Best and Brightest’ companies,” said Junnifer Kluge, NABR president. “These companies have created impressive organizational value and business results through their policies and best practices in human resource management. This award has become a designation sought after by hundreds of metro Atlanta area companies.”

We are proud to achieve this designation for the third time, and of our staff’s steadfast dedication to our patients, their families and to each other. This is recognition of the internal support we have for one another in reinventing health care, which is seen every day. We would like to say congratulations and thank you our staff and partners for creating an environment that supports a positive work culture represented by inclusion, innovation and respect.

We will continue striving to make this a wonderful place to work as we effectively work together to provide the best care for our patients!

Related Resources

Repositioning the Psychiatric Service Continuum at Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods

Adult PsychiatryThe National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) projects over the next 25 years, we will witness the largest population increase in people over 60 years old in the history of mankind, in addition to a general population that will reach 400 million by 2030. The need for psychiatric services is also expected to increase during this period. These projections demand a review of how we provide psychiatric services.

As a result of this review, Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods is proud to announce the launch of our new Adult and Senior Inpatient Psychiatry Programs. Our inpatient care model includes a diagnostic assessment, initial treatment and crisis stabilization to insure our patients safely transition from inpatient care to outpatient therapy. We also offer advanced treatments for psychiatric and mood disorders, including electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), Ketamine Infusions and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) – treatments that all may be continued after patients leave the hospital.

Our outpatient service offerings incorporate the Transitions Senior Program /Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP) & Intensive Outpatient Counseling Program (IOCP). We also offer general outpatient psychiatric care office visits. Additionally, we are also pleased to highlight the success of our recently launched 60+ Men’s Support Group. Our multi-specialty team of psychiatrists, residents, fellows, psychiatric nurses, licensed clinical social workers, licensed professional counselors; certified addiction counselors and mental health associates utilize best practices to treat a full range of psychiatric disorders.

Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods has taken a creative role in developing, improving and increasing our psychiatric services for the next decade.

Stay tuned to see what is next!

Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods
1821 Clifton Road, NE
Atlanta, GA 30329

For more information

  • Inpatient/ ECT/Ketamine/TMS: 404-728-6222
  • Outpatient Services: 404-728-4776

Emory Ebola Team to Receive Award for Exceptional Nursing

Obama at Emory

Last year, President Obama met with Emory University Hospital physicians, nurses and staff involved in the treatment of Ebola patients.

Emory Healthcare has been given the privilege of treating multiple patients infected with Ebola virus. Emory University Hospital’s special isolation unit, built in cooperation with the CDC, is one of four Serious Communicable Disease Units (SCDU) in the U.S. Our highly trained, exceptional staff and physicians are now being honored for the extraordinary care they provided to critically ill patients diagnosed with Ebola virus disease.

The National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) and the DAISY Foundation will award Emory’s Ebola Team with the National Patient Safety Foundation’s DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses at the NPSF Patient Safety Congress on April 29-May 1 in Austin, Texas.

This award stems from the DAISY (Diseases Attacking the Immune System) Foundation’s signature program, the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses, which is given in over 1,900 health care facilities in all 50 states and in 14 other countries. Nurses who received the DAISY Award within their organizations in 2013 or 2014 were eligible for this new, national award, which places special emphasis on patient and workforce safety. This national award recognizes some of the most exceptional contributions to patient safety by nurses.

Related Resources

Emory Healthcare Turns Trash into Treasure

Emory RecyclesMetal hand railings, bathroom plumbing fixtures, signage, kitchen cabinets, doors and windows – these items come to mind when renovating or building a new structure, but they should also be considered when demolishing a building, too. Sometimes, these materials don’t need to end up in the dumpster!

The Emory Healthcare (EHC) Facilities Management team partnered with a group of volunteers from the Lifecycle Building Center to redefine what it means to reuse and repurpose at EHC.

To make room for the new hospital bed tower on Clifton Road, the Emory University sorority houses on Gambrell Drive were demolished. , Facilities Management salvaged many items, such as those listed above, from the sorority houses. Rather than throwing away perfectly useful building fixtures, the Lifecycle Building Center will repurpose the items throughout the community for use in other building construction and renovation projects.

The Lifecycle Building Center is a non-profit organization in Atlanta that diverts construction and demolition waste by salvaging reusable building materials and making them available to the public through a variety of means, including a retail operation in southwest Atlanta. The proceeds of the retail store are reinvested back into the community through programs that promote resource efficiency in the built environment. At the core of the center’s mission is the redirection of materials to organizations in need, which has both local and global impacts. Some of the salvaged materials from the sorority houses, such as a bike rack, cabinetry, fire extinguishers and ADA-compliant sinks, have been offered to local organizations, schools and fire departments in need of such items.

As Emory Healthcare is committed to going green throughout the entire new tower construction, this process will help reduce the amount of landfill waste produced, while giving back to the community.

Stay up to date on construction updates at emoryhealthcare.org/expansion!