Posts Tagged ‘women’s heart disease’

Emory Women’s Heart Center Wear Red Events

womensheartwearredHeart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States, but in many cases it’s preventable. That’s why Emory Healthcare would like to invite you to join us at one of our women’s heart health events in celebration and recognition of Heart Month in February, as well as Mother’s Day in May.

During these fun, educational events, participants will have an opportunity to meet Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians and staff and learn about how to prevent, detect and treat heart disease. You will also have the opportunity to purchase products and services from our vendors who will be on hand providing consultations, displaying jewelry, sharing healthy foods, etc.

To learn more, please call Emory HealthConnection℠ at 404-778-7777. The events are free! Parking will be available in hospitals’ main parking lots.

Emory Women’s Heart Center Wear Red Event Details

Friday, February 5, 2016
Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital
Doctors Building Atrium
7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Friday, February 19, 2016
Emory University Hospital
Hospital Auditorium
Open House from
7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Friday, May 6, 2016
Emory University Hospital Midtown
Medical Office Tower Atrium
Open House from
7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

View more Wear Red Event information here

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Is Jaw Pain a Warning Sign of a Heart Attack?

jaw painWhile chest pain is the most common symptom of a heart attack in both men and women, it may not be the most prominent one. This is especially true for women, who are more likely than men to experience a heart attack without any chest pain at all. However, women are also more likely than men to experience other, less common symptoms, including jaw pain.

Heart attacks occur when oxygen-rich blood is unable to flow through the arteries and into the heart muscle. When this happens, a distress signal is sent to the spinal column through the nerves connected to the heart. Many nerves meet in the same location on the spine, including those coming from the jaw. As a result, when the signals from the heart reach the brain, sometimes the brain misinterprets the source of the original signal, and instead of alerting the body about the danger by sending pain signals to the heart, it sends the pain signals to the jaw instead.

If the jaw pain is constant, it may be due to a dental health issue. However, if it’s a symptom of a heart attack, the pain is more likely to be intermittent and increase with activity. If you experience jaw pain and there’s no other obvious cause, you should call 911 — even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack. A heart attack can begin to damage the heart within 30 minutes of the start of symptoms, and sometimes the damage is irreversible. Visit the Emory Women’s Heart Center website to learn about other atypical heart attack symptoms .

It can also help to know your personal risk level and what you can do to help prevent a heart attack. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment with an Emory Women’s Heart Center specialist today.

About Dr. Cutchins

Alexis Cutchins, MDAlexis Cutchins, MD is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her internship and residency in internal medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women, in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Price Lundberg, MD , provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

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Do All Heart Attacks Present With Chest Pain?

women heart painChest pain is the most common symptom of a heart attack in both men and women. However, it is important to understand that the exact nature of chest pain can be quite different in women and is often not the most prominent symptom of a heart attack.

Most of us probably think of a heart attack the way it is portrayed on television and in the movies: A sudden, dramatic occurrence that causes the victim to clutch his or her chest in agony. Women, however, may report chest pressure, discomfort, fullness or a burning sensation. In addition, they often experience pain in adjacent areas, such as the upper abdomen, upper back, neck, arms and jaw.

As a result of this variation of presenting symptoms, women who have complaints other than chest pain during a heart attack may be overlooked or not evaluated in a timely fashion. Women are more likely than men to have already sustained heart damage by the time they reach the emergency room. A heart attack can begin to cause damage within minutes of the start of symptoms, and sometimes this damage is irreversible. This is why it is critical that women and their loved ones learn to recognize the typical and atypical symptoms of a heart attack and seek emergency care immediately.

Screening is one way for women to determine their risk for heart disease. Through screening efforts, individuals can identify ways to reduce their risk of a heart attack and find out if they need to see a cardiologist for additional evaluation and testing. The Emory Women’s Heart Center offers comprehensive cardiac risk assessments for women who may be at risk for heart disease or want to learn more about what they can do to reduce this risk. As part of these comprehensive screenings, we review strategies to improve overall cardiovascular health and offer treatment options if appropriate.  Schedule your screening today!

Heart Disease Screening

About Dr. Isiadinso

Ijeoma Isiadinso, MDIjeoma Isiadinso, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York, majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as chief fellow during the final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.

Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools and universities and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

Dr. Isiadinso is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular diseases, nuclear cardiology, echocardiography and cardiovascular computed tomography. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Black Cardiologists, the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Preventive Cardiology and the American Public Health Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiac screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

Related Links

How Does Heart Disease Present Differently in Women?

Women's Heart DiseaseHeart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States, but it can manifest differently in women. In addition, certain types of heart disease affect women more often than men.

The most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease (CAD). This occurs as a result of plaque buildup in the arteries (atherosclerosis) causing a decrease in blood flow to the heart muscle. It is well known that women may experience different symptoms of CAD than men. One of the most common symptoms is chest pain, also known as angina, which occurs when the heart does not receive enough oxygen-rich blood. In men, angina tends to manifest as a pressure or squeezing sensation in the chest. Although women also have chest pain, they are more likely to have atypical symptoms such as indigestion, shortness of breath or pain in the neck, jaw, stomach or back.

Coronary microvascular disease (MVD) is similar to CAD in that it affects the blood supply to the heart muscle. Instead of the major coronary arteries being blocked by significant plaque, in MVD there is spasm of the smaller arteries of the heart. This disorder affects women in greater numbers than men. Risk factors for coronary MVD are similar to those for CAD, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and high cholesterol. As with CAD, angina is the most common symptom. However, in MVD, the angina tends to occur during normal daily activities and at times of mental stress.

Broken heart syndrome is another type of heart disease that is more common in women. Broken heart syndrome is also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy or takotsubo cardiomyopathy and is characterized by chest pain and shortness of breath. Although, the symptoms are similar to a heart attack, stress-induced cardiomyopathy is not associated with significantly blocked coronary arteries. As the name implies, this syndrome develops as a result of extreme emotional or physical stress. Most individuals completely recover within a short amount of time with appropriate treatment.

Because heart disease often affects women differently than men, Emory created the Women’s Heart Center, a unique program dedicated to diagnosis, screening, treatment and prevention of heart disease in women. The Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians understand these differences and have specialized education and expertise in this area.

About Dr. Isiadinso

Ijeoma Isiadinso, MDIjeoma Isiadinso, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York, majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as chief fellow during the final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.

Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools and universities and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

Dr. Isiadinso is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular diseases, nuclear cardiology, echocardiography and cardiovascular computed tomography. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Black Cardiologists, the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Preventive Cardiology and the American Public Health Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiac screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

Related Links