Posts Tagged ‘women heart disease’

Did you know that you can exercise at work even if you have a desk job?

Exercise at WorkThe Emory Center for Heart Disease Prevention staff are practicing what they preach and are doing their best to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity most days of the week. They recently acquired 2 bike pedal systems that fit under the desk so staff can exercise while working. These unique devices are small and easy to use and can be used for short periods of time to get your heart pumping. After using the bike pedals, Emory registered nurse Charlotte Applequist, RN commented, “I was surprised that I burned a total of 142 calories pedaling on and off through out the day! A lot of days I don’t get to workout at home, so this was great! My mood is better at work as well; my stress level was reduced.”

Emory Senior Medical Secretary Patty Watson also commented, “I sit a lot at work and my commute is two hours round trip to Emory. Already, I can feel the benefit of stronger legs and mentally I feel more invigorated.”

Exercise is one part of the equation in the fight against heart disease but Emory Women’s Heart Center Nurse Practitioner Chris Nell-Dybdahl also recommends that in order to improve cardiovascular health you must eat a heart healthy Mediterranean – style diet, reduce stress and follow a prevention plan.

Heart Disease Screening

To find out if you are at risk for heart disease, schedule your heart screening today by calling 404-778-7777 or visit emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart

If you work on or near the Emory campus, drop by the Emory Heart Disease Prevention Center at The Emory Clinic, Second Floor Cardiology and see what the fuss is all about as well as inquire about purchasing these for your office!

About Christine Nell-Dybdahl, NP-C, MPH, MSN

Christine Nell – Dybdahl, NP – C, MPH, MSN has been a registered nurse since 1994 and a nurse practitioner since 1998. She brings to the practice over 20 years of cardiology experience. She is the clinical nurse director for Emory’s Center for Heart Disease Prevention and is active with the Emory’s Women’s Heart Program. She received her BSN from Kent State University and her dual master degrees from Emory University in nursing (board certified family nurse practitioner) and public health (health education and promotion). Her interests include cardiovascular disease prevention, heart healthy life style changes, cholesterol abnormalities, women’s heart care, and family-involved chronic heart disease management. Chris is a member of the American College of Cardiology, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She makes it a priority to connect interested patients and researchers at Emory. She is the founder and clinical leader of the Women Living with Angina Support Group. She has co-authored several journal articles and has spoken at many conferences on a wide variety of topics

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

About the Emory Heart Disease Prevention Center

Emory Heart Disease Prevention specialists provide a collaborative and comprehensive approach to the prevention, detection and reversal of heart disease. We offer a full range of prevention and wellness programs that will help you stay healthy. You can count on our commitment to guiding you to a healthier way of life for yourself and those you love.

How the “Superwoman” Syndrome Impacts Heart Health

superwoman4Are you a woman who tries to do it all? Many women are busier than ever these days juggling their careers, families, children, household duties, social lives and other obligations. When we can’t do it all, many of us feel guilty that we are unable to achieve perfection and balance in our lives. At the times we are most stressed, many of us make unhealthy choices, such as leaving exercise out of our daily routine, eating unhealthy foods and not getting enough rest. Unfortunately, this “superwoman” syndrome can lead to higher blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, higher cholesterol, cancer and importantly, heart disease, which is the number one killer of women in this country.

Heart disease may be prevented and is potentially reversible in many cases, so it’s important to learn how to make the best choices for our future health.

1. Realize that it is ok to not be perfect all the time. You are not alone — ask any other woman, and most likely you will learn that she is experiencing some of the same struggles as you. When you can’t be perfect, learn to laugh through the chaos.

2. Learn stress-relieving techniques. Determine the avenue for stress relief that works best for you. For some people it is going out for a run or scheduling a girls’ night, while others may prefer some time alone. Determine which activities make you happiest and make sure to work some of these into your schedule.

3. Eat healthy foods. Food choices can dramatically impact the way you feel. Make sure to balance protein, carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, and good fats in each meal so that your body has the energy it needs to make it through the toughest days.

4. Rest. Make sure to get six to eight hours of rest each night. Although it may be hard to pack this much rest into the day with your hectic schedule, try to rest as much as possible so you are alert and more productive. When you are rested, you can accomplish more, and you feel better overall.

5. Exercise. Try to work exercise into your daily routine. Exercise has been proven to increase energy levels, lower stress and improve mood. If you don’t have time to go out for a morning run, walk up stairs, park at the back of the parking lot, do squats at your desk while on a teleconference or lift hand weights while you are waiting for your child to get ready for school.

All of the recommendations above do not have to be completed at once — at first, try taking small steps toward improving your health. If you have a high-stress lifestyle and think you may be at risk for heart disease, schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening at the Emory Women’s Heart Center. Emory Women’s Heart Center nurse practitioners may be able to help you craft a plan to help you reduce stress and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

screening-bar

Farheen Shirazi, MDAbout Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Links

Quiz: Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?

Stress & Heart Disease Chat With Dr. Parashar

Keep Your Heart Healthy – Get Active!

Signs That You May Need a Cardiovascular Screening

Make a Healthy Nutrition New Year’s Resolution You Will Keep All Year Long!

Heart Disease is Not Just a “Man’s Disease”

Heart Disease PreventionHeart disease is often considered “a man’s disease” so you may be surprised to learn that over 8.6 million women worldwide die from heart disease each year. This accounts for over 1/3 of all deaths in women. In fact, heart disease kills 6 times more women each year compared to breast cancer.*

Interesting Facts on Heart Disease in Women Vs. Men:

  • Women often times wait longer than men to go to an emergency room for treatment while having a heart attack.
  • Physicians, not specifically trained in women and heart disease, some times have a harder time diagnosing heart attacks in women because of the differences in presentation of symptoms.
  • Women’s hearts respond better than men’s hearts to healthy changes in lifestyle.
  • Within a year after a heart attack, 38% of women will die, compared to 25% of men.
  • Women are more than 2 times more likely to die after bypass surgery then men.

Women with Diabetes are Four Times More Likely to Develop Heart Disease

A new research study from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine demonstrated that women under 60 who have diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop coronary artery disease compared to those without diabetes. This news is especially important as none of the subjects had heart disease at the time of their enrollment.

In addition, we know that women under the age of 60 tend to have lower rates of heart disease compared to their male counterparts. However, this study shows that the presence of diabetes eliminated that gender disparity. These findings highlight the need for aggressive screening and management of other risk factors for coronary heart disease among younger diabetic women.

It is imperative to recognize that heart disease can present differently in women compared to men. Women often wait longer to get help and this can lead to irreversible damage to the heart muscle.

The most common symptoms of heart disease in women are :

  1. Chest Pain
  2. Pain in the back, neck, arms or jaw
  3. Upper abdominal pain
  4. Nausea or lightheadedness
  5. Shortness of breath
  6. Sweating
  7. Fatigue

If you suspect you have heart disease, visit your physician to be screened. You can check out the Emory Women’s Heart Center for details on screening. If you suspect you are having a heart attack, get help immediately. Remember, every minute makes a difference and could save your life.

About Dr. Isiadinso
Ijeoma Isiadinso, M.D.Ijeoma Isiadinso, MD MPH is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as Chief Fellow during her final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.
Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools, universities, and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Understanding Heart Disease in Women

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi, Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist, recently conducted a live web chat on the topic of women and heart disease. During the chat, Dr. Shirazi provided participants with information ranging from how women can prevent heart disease to the importance of getting treatment right away, and details on the latest research underway to combat heart disease in women.

One of our attendees in Tuesday’s chat asked Dr. Shirazi, “What is the best diet for patients with heart disease?” Dr. Shirazi noted that the most effective diet will depend on each person’s specific risk factors for heart disease, but in general, the most recent evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet is heart healthy. Dr. Shirazi explained that the Mediterranean Diet is rich in lean protein (poultry), good fats (olive oil) and omega-3s (fatty fish), and low in saturated fats and bad carbohydrates. And like any healthy diet, the Mediterranean Diet is low in sodium and loaded with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Another great question fielded by Dr. Shirazi in Tuesday’s live chat was related to symptoms and warning signs of heart disease, “I have read that symptoms of coronary heart disease are different in woman than in men, but when symptoms present, at what point should you seek medical attention? I sometimes feel chest discomfort, even sharp pains, but how will I know if it’s more serious than say stress for example?” Dr. Shirazi says patients should trust their instincts if something doesn’t “feel right,” in which case, Dr. Shirazi recommends seeing a medical professional. “A provider will be able to evaluate your symptoms and do appropriate screening. If you’re having any symptoms such as: chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, excessive fatigue, dizziness, loss of consciousness, or abdominal pain (to list a few), you should see your primary care physician. Your cardiologist will then be able to further assess your risk for heart disease,” she says.

In addition to the questions above, Dr. Shirazi answered questions related to cholesterol levels, hormone replacement therapy, and several other topics specific to heart disease in women. Most importantly, though, she reminded participants to take action immediately if they are at risk for, or experiencing symptoms of, heart disease.

For more information, check out the Women and Heart Disease chat transcript.

Related Resources:

Emory Welcomes 3 New Female Cardiologists to the Women’s Heart Program!

Dr. Brown, Dr. Cutchins, Dr. Shirazi

Emory Women’s Heart Program utilizes a women-focused, comprehensive process to assess cardiovascular risk factors and diagnose and treat heart disease. Our goal is to help women prevent heart disease and improve cardiovascular outcomes through the highest quality patient- and family-centered care, research and education.

The Emory Heart & Vascular Center is excited to welcome three new female cardiologists to the Women’s Heart Program team! Jennifer Brown, MD, Alexis Cutchins, MD, and Farheen Shirazi, MD, (pictured left to right) will provide general and preventive cardiology services with a special emphasis on women with heart disease.

Dr. Brown received her cardiology training at the University of Maryland Medical Center. In addition to the specialties listed above, she has a particular interest in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure in women being treated for breast cancer. Dr. Brown will practice at the following locations:

Eastside

Clifton Road

Rockdale

1608 Tree Lane, Suite 101
Snellville, GA 30078
404-778-8360

1365 Clifton Road, NE, Building A, 2nd Floor
Atlanta, GA 30322
404-778-5299

1400 Wellbrook Circle
Conyers, GA 30012
404-778-8150

Dr. Shirazi recently completed her cardiology fellowship at Emory University and will practice at the following locations:

Johns Creek

Cumming

6335 West Johns Crossing
Physician Plaza, Suite 110
Johns Creek, GA 30097
404 -778-8240

1200 Bald Ridge Marina Road, Suite 150
Cumming, GA 30041
770-886-0003

Dr. Cutchins recently completed her cardiology fellowship at the University of Virginia Medical Center and will practice at the following locations:

Perimeter

Midtown

875 Johnson Ferry Road
Atlanta, GA 30342
404-778-6070

550 Peachtree Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30308
404-686-7878

The Program staff has extensive experience regarding the unique aspects of heart disease in women. Our multi-disciplinary team includes female and male cardiologists, female nurse practitioners, nurses, nutritionists and exercise physiologists, as well as a full-range of specialists. We provide counseling on weight loss, exercise programs, diet and other lifestyle changes to help treat and reduce the risk of heart disease in women. In addition, we can help women understand how stress, obesity, depression and menopause may impact their heart health.

To refer a patient to one of Emory’s new female cardiologists, please call the number associated with the clinic listed above that is most convenient for your patient. To learn more about all of our locations, please call the Emory Physician Consult Line at 404-778-5050.

Heart Disease in Young Women

Young Women Heart Disease Web ChatDid you know that heart disease is the number one killer of women? And, what is more alarming is that heart disease affects women of all ages, not just older women. It is very important to know that younger women are more likely to fail to recognize their risk. According to researchers at the American Heart Association, about 16,000 women under age 55 die of heart disease each year, which is close to the same number of women of the same age who die of breast cancer. So, women of all ages should listen up: learn the symptoms of a heart attack so you are not one of the statistics!

If you are young women and have a history of heart disease in your family, have risk factors that could lead to heart disease or are concerned about your chances of developing heart disease, join us on Tuesday, May 15, 2012, at 12:30 p.m. EST for a live chat on Heart Disease in Young Women.

Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist Susmita Parashar, MD, will answer questions about heart disease in young women including:

  • Why it is crucial for women to know the symptoms of heart disease in women
  • What young women can do to prevent heart disease
  • The importance of getting treatment right away
  • The research underway to combat heart disease in women

To register, visit Emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

Atypical Warning Signs for Heart Attack in Women

Emory Women’s Heart Program cardiologist, Dr. Susmita Parashar outlines some of the differences in the symptoms of heart disease in women versus men in this CNN news piece.

Stress & Heart Disease Chat Sign Up

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life program.

Join Emory Cardiologist Susmita Parashar, MD in a live chat on Stress and Heart Disease* on Tuesday, February, 28, 2012 at 12:30. To learn more visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

 

Related Resources:

 

Young Women, Take Notice: Heart Disease can Affect You Too!

Heart disease affects women of all ages.  Three Saint Joseph’s Hospital patients shared their incredible stories of surviving heart disease at a young age on Sunday, February 5, Focus Atlanta show.  In addition, Saint Joseph cardiologist, Dr. Lee Padove,  gives risk factors, symptoms and treatment options for women who have heart disease.   View these incredible patient stories by checking out the video below, and take charge of your heart health today!

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life program.