Posts Tagged ‘Q&A’

Heart Failure Live Chat Transcript

Heart Failure Live Chat 7/25/17

Thank you to those of you who joined the Heart Failure Live Chat on 7/25/17 hosted by Dr. Divya Gupta from Emory’s Heart & Vascular Center. Dr. Gupta provided valuable insights into the causes of heart failure including contributing factors like heredity and medical conditions, treatment options and lifestyle changes. The live chat had a good turnout and the transcript is now available below.

Heart Failure Live Chat Transcript

 

Overview: If you or a family member has been diagnosed with heart failure you likely have many questions. Here’s your chance to ask an expert about living with heart failure, treatment options, second opinions, prevention; whatever’s on your mind. Join us on Tuesday, July 25 when Dr. Divya Gupta, a board certified heart failure cardiologist with the Emory Heart & Vascular Center, will answer all your questions.

12:01 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Hi everyone, please note that all questions are moderated before appearing in the stream, so you may not see yours appear right away, but we will do our best to answer all your questions today.

12:01 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: We received some questions that were submitted in advance of the chat, so we’ll get started by answering a few of those first.

12:05 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Is a patient with pulmonary hypertension more likely to develop CHF than a patient a heart that is comprised?

12:05 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: A patient with pulmonary hypertension is more likely to develop heart failure on the right side of the heart vs. left side of the heart. Heart failure on the right side is associated with swelling of the legs and abdomen which can cause physical limitations.

12:09 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Is heart failure hereditary?

12:09 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Yes, heart failure can be hereditary. Many times, we’re not able to figure out what the genetic alteration is that leads to it, but we do have evidence that it can run in families when looking at their family tree.  However, not all heart failure is heredity and different medical conditions can lead to heart failure. If there is a significant concern, genetic testing and counseling is recommended. With this data, the geneticist can identify the genetic alteration that runs in your family and preventative treat

12:12 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: How safe is it to become pregnant with a leaky heart valve?

12:13 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: The safety of becoming pregnant with a leaky heart valve depends on which valve and to what extent it is leaking. This would require close monitoring and consultation with cardiologist and high- risk obstetrician.

12:16 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: We have a dedicated clinic for congenital heart conditions that specializes in treating patients with leaky heart valves, the Adult Congenital Heart Center. These physicians work closely with high-risk obstetricians within the Emory Healthcare system.  Please call HealthConnection to set up an appointment at 404­–778–7777.

12:19 P.M.
Guest5115: Are there differences in symptoms or treatment between heart failure caused by congenital heart defects and acquired heart failure?

12:20 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Heart failure is a clinical diagnosis and so the symptoms are similar in both populations. Typically, symptoms include tiredness, shortness of breath, issues with fluid retention.

12:21 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Another pre- chat question:  I was recently dx with left sided heart failure with an ejection fraction of 31- 40%.  I’ m on Coreg twice a day.  Is there anything else I need to know to help me improve my condition?  Also, I was working out before diagnosis.  I have literally stopped.  What type of exercise do you recommend?  And I Ian having a pulling sharp pain in the center of my chest.  Could that be relevant to my condition?  Work up show no cardiac relations.

12:25 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Coreg is an excellent medicine that has been shown to improve left side heart function, we typically increase the dose of this medicine so that a patient is taking 25– 50 mg twice a day, over several months. Also, we typically put patients on Lisinopril.

12:29 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Exercise is strongly recommended to help improve heart function as well.  Aerobic exercise is best, walking, running, biking or swimming are all acceptable forms of exercise. We don’t recommend heavy weight lifting and typically restrict weight lifting to no more than 50 pounds total.  When beginning an excise routine, start slow and increase as tolerated.  Make sure you listen to your body.  If you need to take a break and rest, that’s fine before starting again. The American Heart Association recommends 30 min

12:35 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: There are two types of implantable devices often used in patients with low ejection fractions, defibrillator, and pacemaker. Anyone with an ejection fraction equal or less than 35% should be considered for a defibrillator, these devices monitor heart rhythm 24/ 7 and will function to save your life in the event of a life- threatening heart rhythm. Patients with low ejection fraction are at greater risk of having these life- threatening heart rhythms.

12:36 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Pacemakers are beneficial to some patients with low ejection fractions, the need for a pacemaker would be determined by your cardiologist. If they feel it would be beneficial, the pacemaker would help improve heart failure symptoms and help you live longer.

12:39 P.M.
Carol B.: My 86-yr. old Mom with a valve problem can barely stand without back pain and so tired?  Is this caused by lack of exercise or heart valve?

12:40 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: The fatigue portion could be attributed to her valve problem, unfortunately, the valve issue could be preventing her from exercising which in turn may cause the back pain.  She would benefit from an evaluation of her valve and cardiac issues. You can make an appointment by calling HealthConnection at 404–778–7777.

12:43 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Is a BMT a good tool to diagnose CHF, versus lung disease?

12:44 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Yes. Another name for BMT is Cardiopulmonary Exercise Test. This is an excellent way to determine what is causing a patient to be tired and short of breath. It can not only help diagnose heart failure and lung disease but can also help determine if the lack of exercise is playing a role.

12:46 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: These questions have been great! We have time for just one more question today. Any remaining questions will be answered by Dr. Gupta in a post- chat Q& A blog on http://advancingyourhealth.org

12:48 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: My mom has congestive Heart Failure and needs the best heart doctor.

12:49 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Emory Heart & Vascular Center has many excellent physicians who are board certified in Advanced Heart Failure & Transplant Cardiology. Our nurses at HealthConnection can help you find the best physician for your Mom. They can be reached at 404–778–7777.

12:50 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: Are there any other questions?

12:52 P.M.
EmoryHealthcare: That’ s all the time we have for today. Thanks so much for joining us! As we mentioned, we’ll follow up with a blog post to answer any questions we didn’t get a chance to address today. Thank you!


Want to Learn More?

At Emory Healthcare’s Heart & Vascular Center, your health is our priority. Our program is consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top heart health centers in the nation.

or call 404-778-7777 to make an appointment.

 

 

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes

Cardiac arrest, once thought to be rare in young athletes, is becoming increasingly prevalent.  According to some experts, a high school student dies of cardiac arrest as often as every three days. A young person’s cardiac arrest could stem from a structural defect in the heart, or a problem with its electrical circuitry. But the most frequent cause of cardiac arrest among young athletes—making up nearly 40 percent of all cases— is the Hypertrophic Cadriomyopathy (HCM) which is a thickening of the heart muscle.

Fortunately, there are warning signs of both hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrest. To ensure good health during healthy competition among young athletes, parents and guardians need to be aware of the symptoms of both.

Join Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist and director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic, B. Robinson Williams III, MD  onThursday, August 9, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat on the topic of sudden cardiac arrest in young athletes. Dr. Williams will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about cardiac arrest in young athletes including causes, symptoms, and how to quickly treat, if it occurs.

You can register online for the live chat today!

Related Resources

Heart Disease Questions? Join Us for Our First Live Chat!

Heart Disease Live Chat with Dr. Sperling23 million people are diagnosed with heart disease each year, and heart disease is responsible for over 6 million hospitalizations in the U.S. annually. Don’t be a statistic.

Join me on Monday, February 21 from 12:30 – 1:30pm for an interactive online Q & A web chat on the topic of heart disease prevention. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about heart disease including prevention, detection, healthy nutrition tips, cardiac rehabilitation and innovative new cardiovascular research on the horizon. You can register online for the live chat today! UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

About Dr. Sperling

Dr. Sperling specializes in internal medicine and cardiology—his areas of clinical interest are cardiac catheterization, cardiac rehabilitation, general cardiology, echocardiogram, lipid metabolism, and electron beam computed tomography. Dr. Sperling has been practicing with Emory since 1997, and has received various awards from the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association Council, and Emory University Hospital. He serves as medical director for a number of unique programs at Emory including the HeartWise Risk Reduction Program, InterVent Atlanta, Staying Aloft, Emory’s LDL aperesis program, and has served as special consultant to The Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Sperling has been voted one of America’s Top Doctors, and has been featured often on local and national TV, newspaper, radio, and magazines.