Posts Tagged ‘prevention’

The Fraternal Order of Eagles Helps Emory Patients Take Steps Toward Heart Disease Prevention

Emory’s Heart Disease Prevention Program, HeartWise℠ , helps patients reduce their risk for heart disease, the number one cause of death among men and women in the U.S. The HeartWise℠ program serves not only patients who currently suffer from heart disease, but also aims to identify those who could be candidates for problems down the road (smokers, people who do not exercise, a person with high blood pressure to help them make healthy lifestyle changes to prevent heart disease before it starts.

“I thought: If I was lucky enough to live, I’d change, myself-I realized I could have a new life-new energy, new endurance, and feel better about myself.” A well put statement by Larry King after his 1987 heart attack.

Emory’s HeartWise℠ Heart Disease Risk Reduction Program assists patients in taking steps towards living more heart healthy lives by providing them with leading heart disease prevention methods  and technology.

With the help from the Fraternal Order of Eagles, Emory’s HeartWise℠ program patients are now able to enhance their heart disease prevention program with a brand new, Nu-Step cardio machine.

The Fraternal Order of Eagles, “has provided support for medical centers across the country to build and provide research for medical conditions — raising millions of dollars every year to combat heart disease and cancer, help handicapped kids, uplift the aged and make life a little brighter for everyone.”

Emory Healthcare is extremely grateful for their service and contribution of the Nu-Step cardio machine to our Heart Disease Prevention Program.  Thanks to this generous donation from the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the patients of the Emory’s HeartWise℠ program are literally able to take new strides in their journeys to heart disease prevention and/or rehabilitation.

Mr. Merle Jensen, pictured below surrounded by staff and interns, is extremely pleased with the new, Nu-step cardio machine. “Patients are already requesting another machine, because of its continuous use since its arrival,” states Kathy Lee Bishop, MS, PT, CCS and Manager of the HeartWise℠ program, “I just smile”.

For more information on Emory’s HeartWise℠ Heart Disease Prevention and Risk Reduction Program, or The Fraternal Order of Eagles, check out our related resources.

Related Resources

Spring Your Heart into Health – HeartWise Healthy Eating Event

HeartWise Lecture Series AprilThe HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our March HeartWise lectures online!

♥ Chemicals in Food Packaging, What’s the Harm?
Hannah Clark (Kennesaw State University Exercise Specialist Intern)
Friday, April 6, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

♥ Healthy Eating Made Easy
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, April 6, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

AND

Thursday, April 26, 2012
8:45 AM – 9:15 AM

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our April HeartWise lectures online!

8 Creative Ways to Squeeze Fitness into a Busy Schedule

national start walking dayDo you find yourself exhausted after a long day of work or taking care of the kids, and then you don’t feel like exercising? Well, read up for some creative ways to work fitness into your schedule that can be a lot of fun!

  1. Schedule walks with friends instead of grabbing a happy hour drink or dinner! Enjoy the gorgeous outdoors and catch up with a friend at the same time! You will be shocked how quickly time will fly when you are catching up with an old friend.
  2. Instead of sleeping in, take your kids or dogs to a National Park on a Saturday morning. Georgia has some incredible National Parks – visit http://usparks.about.com/od/travelitineraries/l/blGeorgia-National-Parks.htm. You will be amazed how being out in nature will improve your mood!
  3. While watching TV, instead of lying on the couch, lie down on the ground and do some sit ups, planks or light weights while watching your favorite show for 10 minutes.
  4. Add a little dancing to your cleaning routine! Turn on music and add a bob to your step as you clean around the house. This will burn extra calories while you are dancing.
  5. Instead of driving to the park, local restaurant or neighbor’s house – walk there! You will be able to really take in all that your neighborhood has to offer. The kids also will learn at an early age to enjoy the outdoors and exercise.
  6. Set your alarm for 15 – 20 minutes earlier than normal and go for a short walk/jog around the neighborhood. You not only will feel better, you will have gotten your metabolic system in action and don’t have to worry about trying to fit a workout in after a long, hard day! Try to make it a habit to exercise at least 10 minutes every morning! It will start your day off right.
  7. Always take the stairs instead of the elevator if you are going four flights or less! Make it a contest at work and challenge your colleagues to go further!
  8. Volunteer to walk your neighbor’s dog. Seeing a walk through a dog’s eyes makes the adventure that much fun!

Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2008), the American Heart Association and American College of Sports Medicine (2007) state that even short activities performed in 10 minute segments can improve your health. These organizations recommend getting about 2 and one-half hours of exercise over the course of a week!April 4 is National Start Walking Day. Grab a buddy and get your body in motion! Your heart will thank you for it! Emory University and Healthcare employees – get your walking shoes out and meet us for a 30-minute walk on Wednesday, April 4, at one of the following locations:

  • Emory University Hospital Midtown, 2:00 pm – meet at the fountain between the Orr and Glenn Buildings
  • Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, 12:00 pm – meet near the entrance to the Medical Office Building
  • Lullwater Preserve, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet at the gates to Lullwater Park
  • Grady, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet in the Faculty Office Building lobby
  • Saint Joseph’s Hospital, 10:00 am and 10:45 am – meet in the meditation garden between the Harrison Outpatient Building and the Florence Erb Hayes Specialty Center
  • The Carter Center,12:25 pm – meet in the parking lot staff entrance

For more information, please contact Melissa Morgan, melissa.morgan@emory.edu or 404-727-4328.

If you are not an Emory employee and want to get your organization involved in National Start Walking Day, contact the American Heart Association by visiting www.startwalkingnow.org and request a toolkit.

 

Ready, Set, Walk!

National Start Walking DayWednesday, April 4, 2012 is National Start Walking Day! Emory University and Emory Healthcare employees – get your walking shoes out and meet us for a 30-minute walk on Wednesday, April 4, at one of the following locations:

  • Emory University Hospital Midtown, 2:00 pm – meet at the fountain between the Orr and Glenn Buildings
  • Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, 12:00 pm – meet near the entrance to the Medical Office Building
  • Lullwater Preserve, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet at the gates to Lullwater Park
  • Grady, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet in the Faculty Office Building lobby
  • Saint Joseph’s Hospital, 10:00 am and 10:45 am – meet in the meditation garden between the Harrison
  • The Carter Center,12:25 pm – meet in the parking lot staff entrance Outpatient Building and the Florence Erb Hayes Specialty Center

For more information, please contact Melissa Morgan, melissa.morgan@emory.edu or 404-727-4328.

If you are not an Emory employee and want to get your organization involved in National Start Walking Day, contact the American Heart Association by visiting www.startwalkingnow.org and request a toolkit.

Take a step to better health and start walking!

4 Free Heart Disease Prevention Events this month in Atlanta

October Heart Disease Prevention EventsAt the Emory Heart & Vascular Center, we hold events each month for people to embrace their health and focus on opportunities for heart disease prevention and improved heart health. With that in mind, we are excited to announce the October events & lectures in the HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series!

The HeartWise program aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our October HeartWise lectures online!

Nutrition for Heart
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, October 3, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Medications
Jane Whitmer, RN
Monday, October 10, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Heart Healthy Cooking Demo
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, October 17, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Chocolate for the Heart
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, October 24, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Our HeartWise events are held at The Emory Clinic, 1525 Clifton Road NE, in the 5th Floor Conference Room.

For more information on heart disease and heart disease prevention, check out our Center for Heart Disease Prevention web site.

Please feel free to leave a comment if you have any questions or thoughts regarding any of the October HeartWise events. We look forward to seeing all of you there!

Quit Smoking, Your Heart Deserves a Break

Smoking & Heart Disease

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of the American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life Program. This program was created by the American Heart Association to help people understand it is never too late to make changes that can improve your health. We will be discussing the final element in Life’s Simple 7 this week – the importance of stopping smoking.

Quitting smoking is the best thing you can do for your overall health if you want to live a long life. Even if you have been smoking for years, by quitting, your lungs will begin to heal and your heart will get stronger.

Why is smoking unhealthy?

Smoking damages your entire circulatory system by:

  • Increasing your risk for coronary heart disease, aneurysms and blood clots.
  • Blood clots and hardened arteries increase your risks for heart attack, stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD).
  • Smoking can also reduce your good cholesterol (HDL) and your lung capacity, making it harder to get the physical activity you need for better health.

What Can I Do to Stop Smoking?

Millions of people have quit so you can too – even if you have tried before and it was unsuccessful. Some ideas to help you stop smoking:

  • Quit with a friend. If another friend smokes – make a pact to quit together. It is always easier with someone else doing it with you and holding you accountable.
  • Take one day at a time, one hour at a time
  • Learn how to replace the craving for cigarettes with healthier options such as fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Don’t consider yourself a failure if you have one cigarette, just commit to yourself to not take another one.
  • Look into support groups in your neighborhood

If you are a parent, it is very important to talk to your children early about the dangers of smoking. Teach them other outlets to use their energy such as sports.

Remember that during your lifetime, smoking will only add to your stress by taking away your good health. The pleasure you will get from smoking is not worth the number of years it will take off your life. Make a pact and quit smoking today! Your heart, your body, your mind, your family, your friends and society will thank you for it!

About Dr. Jeffrey Hershey

Dr. Hershey is a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center.   He sees patient at his clinic office which is located in the physician office building at Emory Johns Creek Hospital .  Dr. Hershey is passionate about helping patients lower their chances of developing heart disease.

Take Action Now to Control Your Weight: Your Heart will Thank You

Lose Weight Healthy HeartDo you know that in the adult population over 66 percent  of people are overweight and over 33 percent are considered obese? In fact, obesity is now considered a risk factor for heart disease, and if you have too much fat you are at higher risk for heart disease. Health problems like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol are common in the overweight population.

It is important to maintain a healthy weight to maintain a healthy heart. How would it feel if you carried a 20 pound weight around every day? By shedding extra weight you are also lessening the burden on your heart, lungs, blood vessels and skeleton. You will be surprised by how much more energy you have when you cut your weight down to a manageable place.

How to lose weight

If you are overweight, you can reduce your risk for heart disease by successfully losing weight and keeping it off. You also can produce a dramatic blood pressure reduction and lower cholesterol in appropriate ways by exercising, and by eating more fruits and vegetables. Losing as few as five or 10 pounds can provide a meaningful impact on your heart health.

Know Your Calorie Needs

The first step in losing weight is determining how many calories you need to survive. This number is different for everyone, as our bodies all function differently. A 200-pound man can consume much more food without gaining weight than a 100-pound woman. You can calculate this number for yourself.

Track Calories

By tracking what you are eating each day, you can learn a lot about your eating habits. Estimate the amount of calories you burn each day and keep track of the amount of food calories you’re eating as well. If you balance what you are putting in with what is being burned in exercise you will maintain your weight! If you burn more calories than you eat in calories, you will lose weight!

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life Campaign that promotes My Life Check – Life’s Simple 7. Losing weight is one of the seven steps to a healthier heart. To view some of the other blog posts with ways to improve your heart health, visit the older posts in the Emory Heart & Vascular Heart blog.

Learn more about the Emory Heart & Vascular Center’s Heart Disease Prevention Program.

About Dr. Cornelius Flowers

Dr. Cornelius FlowersDr. Flowers is a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center. He practices at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Hillandale and the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Decatur. He specializes in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and preventive cardiology. He is very active in the Dekalb County community and is passionate about educating individuals about how to prevent heart disease. To contact Dr. Flowers, please call 404-778-8100 for the Hillandale office and 404-296-1256 for the Decatur office.

Manage Your Blood Pressure & Keep Your Heart Healthy!

Manage blood pressure heart healthDid you know that approximately 90% of all Americans will develop hypertension over their lifetime? One in three adults has high blood pressure, yet, many people don’t even know they have it.

Hypertension or high blood pressure occurs when your blood flows with too much force through your arteries, stretching your arteries beyond a healthy limit and causing microscopic tears. Though our body naturally repairs these tears with scar tissue that tissue also traps plaque and white blood cells, which can turn into blockages, blood clots, and hardened, weakened arteries. These effects in turn prevent blood flow and cause heart tissue to die, causing further severe conditions such as stroke, heart attack, kidney failure, and heart failure.

High blood pressure is the single most significant risk factor for heart disease and can injure or kill you. It is known as the “silent killer” as it shows no symptoms, except in its most extreme cases known as hypertensive crisis, and without knowing it, you can damage your heart, brain, eyes and kidneys.

Blood pressure measures the force pushing against your arterial walls. A blood pressure reading consists of two numbers, systolic and diastolic. The systolic blood pressure is usually the higher number on the top that shows the pressure on the arteries when the heart is beating or contracting. This usually increases as you get older, but is given more attention as it can be major risk factor for heart disease for those 50 years and over. Diastolic blood pressure is the lower number at the bottom that measures the pressure on the arteries between heart beats or when the heart is resting.

It is very important to maintain your blood pressure at a healthy level to avoid severe health conditions. A normal level of blood pressure is less than 120 mm Hg systolic AND less than 80 mm Hg diastolic, so less than 120/80 mm Hg, for ages 20 and over. Keeping your blood pressure within this range can help reduce your risk of overstretched or injured blood vessel walls and blockages that cause your heart to pump harder as well as protect your body so that your tissue receives regular supplies of oxygen-rich blood.

High blood pressure is manageable and with a few lifestyle changes, you can stay healthy and avoid medication:

  1. Eating a heart-healthy diet, which includes reducing sodium as well as saturated and trans fat, cholesterol and added sugars, and eating foods high in whole grain fiber, lean protein, and a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables.
  2. Being physical active and maintaining a healthy weight- 30 minutes a day of moderate physical activity five times a week. Unfit or moderately fit adults had twice the risk for high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome and diabetes than those who were highly fit.
  3. Managing stress
  4. Limiting alcohol- one to two drinks for men and one drink for women
  5. Avoiding tobacco smoke
  6. Regular Blood pressure screenings- the American Heart Association recommends a blood pressure screening at your regular healthcare visit or once every 2 years after age 20, if your blood pressure is more than 120/80 mm Hg. You can also consider home-monitoring.

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life Campaign that promotes My Life Check –Life’s Simple 7. Eating better is one of the 7 steps to a healthier heart.

Learn more about The Emory Heart & Vascular Center  by visiting: http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/heartandvascular

About Gregory Robertson, MD:
Dr. Robertson specializes in Cardiology and Internal Medicine, and is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory.  He sees patients at Emory Johns Creek Hospital.   He is very experienced in the management of hypertension and some of his other areas of clinical interest include atherosclerosis, cardiac catheterization, cardiovascular disease, valve disease, and peripheral artery disease. Dr. Robertson holds an organizational leadership membership at The American College of Cardiology, and has contributed to multiple publications in his field.

Tips for Eating Better for a Healthier Heart

Heart Healthy Diet

Did you know that more than 90% of Americans do not consistently eat a heart-healthy diet? This can lead to several risk factors, such as high cholesterol and high blood pressure, for heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity.

The American Heart Association recommends that you eat a wide variety of nutritious foods daily from each of the basic food groups to maintain good health. A heart-healthy diet means foods that are low in saturated and trans fat, cholesterol, sodium and added sugars, and foods high in whole grain fiber, lean protein, and a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables. If you are lacking any of these basic food groups in your diet, you are not providing your body enough nutrients to make new cells and maintain energy to fight off diseases.

Following a heart-healthy diet is a great way to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and stay healthy, so how do you start? Here are a few ways you can build a healthy lifestyle:

Stock up on healthy food:

Fill your kitchen with more produce such as vegetables, fruits, fiber-rich whole-grain breads and cereals and fat-free or low-fat dairy products and less refined/processed foods.

  • Vegetables and Fruits- At least 4.5 cups a day. High in vitamins, minerals, and fibers, but low in calories. Eating a variety of different colored vegetables and fruits can help you maintain your blood pressure  and a healthy weight.
  • Unrefined fiber-rich whole grain foods- At least three one-ounce equivalent servings a day. Fiber helps keep you full longer and hence can make you eat less, leading to weight loss and lower blood cholesterol.
  • Fish- Two 3.5 oz servings of oily fish (salmon, trout, and herring) per week. It contains omega-3 fatty acids that decrease your risk of death from coronary heart disease. For more protein, choose skinless meats and poultry and cook them without saturated and trans fat.
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy products- 2 to 3 cups per day. More nutrients especially calcium and less fat, saturated fat, cholesterol and calories.

Reduce Your Intake of:

  • Saturated Fat and Trans Fat- the “bad” fats that raise LDL cholesterol levels. Saturated fat should be less than 7% of your daily calories and trans fat should be less than 1% of your daily calories.
  • Sodium- less than 1500 mg per day
  • Cholesterol- less than 300 mg per day
  • Added sugars- Not more than 36 oz of sugary drinks per week

Track what you’re eating:

Keep a journal or use an online tracker to help you make healthier choices and watch your caloric intake. If you need to lose weight, keeping careful track of your daily caloric intake is one of the best ways to drop the pounds.

Enjoy the new taste:

Changing to a heart-healthy diet can be a bit difficult, but it does not mean you have to eat bland food all the time. There are plenty of nutritional choices available, as well as ways you can spice up your food, that are just as tasty. Many even find fast-food less appealing after switching over. Try some of our Heart- Healthy Recipes to begin your path to a healthy you!

Additional Heart Healthy Resources:

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life Campaign that promotes My Life Check –Life’s Simple 7. Eating better is one of the 7 steps to a healthier heart.

Learn more about Emory Heart & Vascular Center’s Heart Disease Prevention Program.

About Dr. Allen Dollar
Dr. Dollar is a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center. He specializes in heart disease prevention and works with patients to help them reduce their risk of heart disease. He practices at Emory’s Center for Heart Disease prevention located at 1365 Clifton Road, Building A. Dr. Dollar has won many awards for his excellence in the medical field including the Excellence in Teaching Award, the Health Care Hero Award and the Nanette K. Wenger Distinguished Service Award.

6 Opportunities to Reduce Your Heart Disease Risk in August

Heart Disease Prevention Events August

At Emory Healthcare, we’re always doing what we can to provide free educational resources to our patients. We hold events each month for people to embrace their health and focus on opportunities for prevention and wellness. With that in mind, we are excited to announce the August lectures in the HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series!

The HeartWise program aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Diabetes Prevention
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Tuesday, August 9, 2011
9 AM – 9:30 AM

Medications
Jane Whitmer, RN
Monday, August 15, 2011
7:30 AM – 8 AM

Fats: Good, Bad and UGLY!
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, August 15, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Ins & Outs of Exercise
Clay Knight, Exercise Specialist
Monday, August 22, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

High Blood Pressure and Nutrition
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, August 29, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Treatment of Neck Pain
Jordan Tate, MD, Rehabilitation Medicine Resident
Wednesday, August 24, 2011
11:30 AM – 12:00 PM

HeartWise events are held at The Emory Clinic, 1525 Clifton Road NE, in the 5th Floor Conference Room.

For more information on heart disease and heart disease prevention, check out our Center for Heart Disease Prevention web site.

Please feel free to leave a comment if you have any questions or thoughts regarding any of the August HeartWise events. We look forward to seeing all of you there!