Posts Tagged ‘MD chat’

Takeaways from Dr. Lundberg’s Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating Chat

heart health holiday eatingThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, December 9, for our live online chat on “Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating,” hosted by the Clinical Director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center, Gina Lundberg, MD.

With holiday parties in full swing, many of us are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Dr. Lundberg discussed heart-healthy tips and recipes, as well as answered your questions on how to make smart food and drink decisions.

See all of Dr. Lundberg’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What are some entrée or side substitutions I can make without losing the “holiday” touch?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: Turkey and ham are both lean meat, so entrees aren’t usually the problem The side dishes are usually where we run into trouble. Feel free to have your ham, turkey, and even lean pork and beef, but try to avoid the potato-heavy, cheesy side dishes.

 

Question: I crave sweets every day. What can I do to satisfy my cravings without reaching for the chocolate?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: The more sugar you eat, the more you crave sugar. If you stick to a diet that is higher in protein, you’ll be more satisfied and won’t crave sugar as much. Eating healthier snacks more frequently (fruit, veggies, raw nuts) will stop you from being hungry and eating the wrong things.

 

BONUS: Dr. Lundberg’s Top 10 Tips to Stay Healthy During the Holidays

holiday-health-tips

If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript. If you have additional questions for Dr. Lundberg, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

Heart Disease is Not Just a “Man’s Disease”

Heart Disease PreventionHeart disease is often considered “a man’s disease” so you may be surprised to learn that over 8.6 million women worldwide die from heart disease each year. This accounts for over 1/3 of all deaths in women. In fact, heart disease kills 6 times more women each year compared to breast cancer.*

Interesting Facts on Heart Disease in Women Vs. Men:

  • Women often times wait longer than men to go to an emergency room for treatment while having a heart attack.
  • Physicians, not specifically trained in women and heart disease, some times have a harder time diagnosing heart attacks in women because of the differences in presentation of symptoms.
  • Women’s hearts respond better than men’s hearts to healthy changes in lifestyle.
  • Within a year after a heart attack, 38% of women will die, compared to 25% of men.
  • Women are more than 2 times more likely to die after bypass surgery then men.

Atypical Warning Signs for Heart Attack in Women

Emory Women’s Heart Program cardiologist, Dr. Susmita Parashar outlines some of the differences in the symptoms of heart disease in women versus men in this CNN news piece.

Stress & Heart Disease Chat Sign Up

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life program.

Join Emory Cardiologist Susmita Parashar, MD in a live chat on Stress and Heart Disease* on Tuesday, February, 28, 2012 at 12:30. To learn more visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

 

Related Resources:

 

80 million+ Americans suffer from Varicose Veins

Varicose Spider Veins Online ChatCurrent estimates are that more than 80 million Americans suffer from varicose veins and/or spider veins. While cosmetic improvement is often a factor in seeking treatment of varicose veins, relief from pain is a concern for many patients.

If you or someone you know suffers from varicose veins, join us on Tuesday, January 24 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive, online Q&A web chat on the topic of varicose and spider veins. Emory physician assistant Stephen Konigsberg will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about varicose veins, including symptoms, prevention and treatment options, such as low-impact treatment methods (i.e. compression stockings to support and compress veins and improve circulation) and corrective approaches (i.e. procedures like sclerotherapy, Endolaser™ ablation or phlebectomy).

Register online today for the varicose veins chat: UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Related Resources:

 

Is Your High Blood Pressure Out of Control?

High Blood Pressure Web ChatDo you have uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure) and need another option for your care?

If so, the Emory Heart & Vascular Center is now enrolling patients in a study for this condition. Called the Symplicity HTN – 3 Study, this clinical research study will test the safety and effectiveness of a procedure called renal denervation using the Symplicty Catheter System as a treatment for uncontrolled hypertension. You may be eligible to participate in the research if you are between the ages of 18 and 80, you have an average systolic blood pressure (SBP) > to 160mmHg and you are taking three or more antihypertensive medications. Chandan Devireddy, MD, FACC, FSCAI is the principle investigator in the trial at Emory.

For more information about the clinical trial, please contact Emory HealthConnection 404-778-7777.

CAUTION: Investigational device. Limited by Federal (United States) law to investigational use.

If you have high blood pressure and want to learn more about what you can do to manage it, join us tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. for a chat on hypertension with Dr. Susmita Parashar. Visit Emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats to register and see a complete listing of Emory Healthcare’s live chats.

High Blood Pressure Related Resources:

Talk to an MD About Your Blood Pressure – No Appointment!

 

Do you suffer from high blood pressure and want to ask a physician questions without scheduling an appointment?
High Blood Pressure Chat

One third of people living in the United States  experiences high blood pressure. If you are one of the many who suffer from high blood pressure, join Emory Heart & Vascular Center preventive cardiologist Dr. Susmita Parashar on Tuesday, December 6 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat. The topic is “Diagnosing, Treating and Managing High Blood Pressure.”

Dr. Parashar will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about hypertension including symptoms, diagnosis, and treating and living with hypertension. To register for the online chat, visit: http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/heart or click the image to the right to be directed to the chat sign-up form.

 

Related Resources:

Heart Disease Questions? Join Us for Our First Live Chat!

Heart Disease Live Chat with Dr. Sperling23 million people are diagnosed with heart disease each year, and heart disease is responsible for over 6 million hospitalizations in the U.S. annually. Don’t be a statistic.

Join me on Monday, February 21 from 12:30 – 1:30pm for an interactive online Q & A web chat on the topic of heart disease prevention. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about heart disease including prevention, detection, healthy nutrition tips, cardiac rehabilitation and innovative new cardiovascular research on the horizon. You can register online for the live chat today! UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

About Dr. Sperling

Dr. Sperling specializes in internal medicine and cardiology—his areas of clinical interest are cardiac catheterization, cardiac rehabilitation, general cardiology, echocardiogram, lipid metabolism, and electron beam computed tomography. Dr. Sperling has been practicing with Emory since 1997, and has received various awards from the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association Council, and Emory University Hospital. He serves as medical director for a number of unique programs at Emory including the HeartWise Risk Reduction Program, InterVent Atlanta, Staying Aloft, Emory’s LDL aperesis program, and has served as special consultant to The Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Sperling has been voted one of America’s Top Doctors, and has been featured often on local and national TV, newspaper, radio, and magazines.