Posts Tagged ‘live chat’

Takeaways from Dr. Lundberg’s Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating Chat

heart health holiday eatingThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, December 9, for our live online chat on “Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating,” hosted by the Clinical Director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center, Gina Lundberg, MD.

With holiday parties in full swing, many of us are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Dr. Lundberg discussed heart-healthy tips and recipes, as well as answered your questions on how to make smart food and drink decisions.

See all of Dr. Lundberg’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What are some entrée or side substitutions I can make without losing the “holiday” touch?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: Turkey and ham are both lean meat, so entrees aren’t usually the problem The side dishes are usually where we run into trouble. Feel free to have your ham, turkey, and even lean pork and beef, but try to avoid the potato-heavy, cheesy side dishes.

 

Question: I crave sweets every day. What can I do to satisfy my cravings without reaching for the chocolate?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: The more sugar you eat, the more you crave sugar. If you stick to a diet that is higher in protein, you’ll be more satisfied and won’t crave sugar as much. Eating healthier snacks more frequently (fruit, veggies, raw nuts) will stop you from being hungry and eating the wrong things.

 

BONUS: Dr. Lundberg’s Top 10 Tips to Stay Healthy During the Holidays

holiday-health-tips

If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript. If you have additional questions for Dr. Lundberg, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

Take-Aways from Cardiac Arrest Web Chat

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Young AthletesThank you for those who were able to participate in the Emory Heart & Vascular Live Chat on Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes. I was very impressed by many of your questions on the topic of cardiac arrest, and happy to be able to answer them. If you were not able to join me, you can view the Sudden Cardiac Arrest chat transcript here.

In the chat, we covered a variety of important topics pertaining to cardiac arrest symptoms, warning signs, and risk factors. All parents, coaches, and supporters of young athletes should be aware of these warning signs and know how to respond when they present themselves. There are a few key takeaways from last week’s chat that I would like to reiterate:

  1. Children and adults can survive sudden cardiac arrest if parents and others in the area act quickly.
  2. We encourage all coaches and parents learn CPR.
  3. In addition, we recommend obtaining an AED for all sports facilities. The equipment can be costly, but can save the life of a young athlete.

During the chat, there was also a question regarding what sports/activities were deemed too strenuous for those with heart disease. Please refer to the chart below that outlines the classification of competitive sports. The acceptable competive sports for those patients who have been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most other types of heart disease are:

    • Billiards
    • Bowling
    • Cricket
    • Curling
    • Golf
    • Riflery

Please note that if you think you could be at risk for HCM you should visit your primary care physician for an evaluation. If the physician clears you or your child you do not need to limit activity based on the above chart.

If you have additional questions about sudden cardiac arrest in general, or cardiac arrest in young athletes, please use the comments section below. Please also feel free to use the comments section to let us know if you have other heart and vascular topics you would like to cover in future live chats!

Thanks again for a great chat!

Author: B. Robinson Williams, III, M.D.

Related Resources:

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes

Cardiac arrest, once thought to be rare in young athletes, is becoming increasingly prevalent.  According to some experts, a high school student dies of cardiac arrest as often as every three days. A young person’s cardiac arrest could stem from a structural defect in the heart, or a problem with its electrical circuitry. But the most frequent cause of cardiac arrest among young athletes—making up nearly 40 percent of all cases— is the Hypertrophic Cadriomyopathy (HCM) which is a thickening of the heart muscle.

Fortunately, there are warning signs of both hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrest. To ensure good health during healthy competition among young athletes, parents and guardians need to be aware of the symptoms of both.

Join Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist and director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic, B. Robinson Williams III, MD  onThursday, August 9, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat on the topic of sudden cardiac arrest in young athletes. Dr. Williams will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about cardiac arrest in young athletes including causes, symptoms, and how to quickly treat, if it occurs.

You can register online for the live chat today!

Related Resources

Heart Disease in Young Women

Young Women Heart Disease Web ChatDid you know that heart disease is the number one killer of women? And, what is more alarming is that heart disease affects women of all ages, not just older women. It is very important to know that younger women are more likely to fail to recognize their risk. According to researchers at the American Heart Association, about 16,000 women under age 55 die of heart disease each year, which is close to the same number of women of the same age who die of breast cancer. So, women of all ages should listen up: learn the symptoms of a heart attack so you are not one of the statistics!

If you are young women and have a history of heart disease in your family, have risk factors that could lead to heart disease or are concerned about your chances of developing heart disease, join us on Tuesday, May 15, 2012, at 12:30 p.m. EST for a live chat on Heart Disease in Young Women.

Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist Susmita Parashar, MD, will answer questions about heart disease in young women including:

  • Why it is crucial for women to know the symptoms of heart disease in women
  • What young women can do to prevent heart disease
  • The importance of getting treatment right away
  • The research underway to combat heart disease in women

To register, visit Emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

Don’t Let Your Stress Levels Stress Your Heart

Stress & Heart Disease Chat Sign Up

Join Emory Heart & Vascular Center preventive heart disease specialist Susmita Parashar, MD to learn about how stress can contribute to heart disease. Dr. Parashar will participate in a free live web chat on Tuesday, February 28, 2012 and will be available to provide information linking stress to heart disease as well as answer questions on how to best balance your life to reduce stress. The chat will begin at 12:30pm EST.

Register for the Stress & Heart Disease Web Chat: UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

 


About Dr. Susmita Parashar

Dr. Susmita Parashar

Dr. Susmita Parashar is a Board certified cardiologist at the Emory Heart and Vascular Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine. Prior to joining as faculty in the Division of Cardiology, Dr Parashar was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Medicine at Emory for 8 years. She applies her experience as a Board certified internist in providing a holistic care to patients. She was awarded the American Heart Association (AHA) Trudy Bush Fellowship for Cardiovascular Research in Women’s Health Award to recognize outstanding work in the area of women’s health and cardiovascular disease and Emory Department of Medicine Early Career Faculty Research Award for Clinical Research.

Dr Parashar completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Medical College of Georgia, Augusta and Cardiology fellowship at Emory University. She completed her Master of Public Health and a Master of Science from Emory in 2005. A passionate clinician-researcher and educator, she trains medical students, residents and cardiology fellows. In addition, she conducts clinical research. Dr Parashar’s clinical and research focus is in preventive cardiology with a focus on women and cardiovascular diseases.

She has received several grants and awards from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the AHA to conduct research on women and heart disease. She has served as Emory principal investigator for large NIH funded clinical research for heart attack patients. She was also invited to participate as a co-investigator for the NIH funded Cardiovascular Health Study for older adults. She has presented her work in national and international scientific meetings, including the AHA Annual Session, AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke, American College of Cardiology Annual Session, Society of General Internal Medicine and International Congress of Coronary Heart Disease.

Dr. Parashar has authored/coauthored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, including invited textbook chapters, manuscripts, abstracts and review articles. Her work has been published in such prestigious journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine and Circulation, and highlighted by the Nature and national media such as CNN, CBS and NPR news.

She believes in family-career balance and applies her experience as a mother of two young children and wife to her work.


Atypical Warning Signs for Heart Attack in Women

Emory Women’s Heart Program cardiologist, Dr. Susmita Parashar outlines some of the differences in the symptoms of heart disease in women versus men in this CNN news piece.

Stress & Heart Disease Chat Sign Up

Emory Healthcare is a proud sponsor of American Heart Association’s My Heart. My Life program.

Join Emory Cardiologist Susmita Parashar, MD in a live chat on Stress and Heart Disease* on Tuesday, February, 28, 2012 at 12:30. To learn more visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

 

Related Resources:

 

Did you Know Heart Disease is the Number 1 Killer of Women?

And…heart disease kills more women than the next 5 highest causes COMBINED!  In fact, 40,000 more women than men die of heart disease each year.

Gina Lundberg, MD, cardiologist at Saint Joseph’s Hospital who specializes in heart disease in women gives tips of how you can lower your risk for heart disease and protect yourself!


Don’t forget to join Emory Healthcare nutritionist Cheryl Williams, RD, LD  on Thursday, February 9 for a live chat to learn some ideas for heart healthy recipes. To register visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats!

Related Resources:

80 million+ Americans suffer from Varicose Veins

Varicose Spider Veins Online ChatCurrent estimates are that more than 80 million Americans suffer from varicose veins and/or spider veins. While cosmetic improvement is often a factor in seeking treatment of varicose veins, relief from pain is a concern for many patients.

If you or someone you know suffers from varicose veins, join us on Tuesday, January 24 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive, online Q&A web chat on the topic of varicose and spider veins. Emory physician assistant Stephen Konigsberg will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about varicose veins, including symptoms, prevention and treatment options, such as low-impact treatment methods (i.e. compression stockings to support and compress veins and improve circulation) and corrective approaches (i.e. procedures like sclerotherapy, Endolaser™ ablation or phlebectomy).

Register online today for the varicose veins chat: UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Related Resources:

 

Talk to an MD About Your Blood Pressure – No Appointment!

 

Do you suffer from high blood pressure and want to ask a physician questions without scheduling an appointment?
High Blood Pressure Chat

One third of people living in the United States  experiences high blood pressure. If you are one of the many who suffer from high blood pressure, join Emory Heart & Vascular Center preventive cardiologist Dr. Susmita Parashar on Tuesday, December 6 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat. The topic is “Diagnosing, Treating and Managing High Blood Pressure.”

Dr. Parashar will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about hypertension including symptoms, diagnosis, and treating and living with hypertension. To register for the online chat, visit: http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/heart or click the image to the right to be directed to the chat sign-up form.

 

Related Resources:

Has Your Heart Ever Skipped a Beat?

Arrhythmia Web Chat with Dr. El-ChamiHave you ever experienced a skipped heart beat or a change in the regular beat of your heart? If so, you may have a rhythm disorder called an Arrhythmia. Arrhythmias are common in middle-aged adults. Some arrhythmias are relatively harmless, but others can be fatal if not treated. Nearly 1,000,000 people are hospitalized for an arrhythmia each year, and some arrhythmias, such as Atrial Fibrillation, are extremely common and affect over 2,500,000 million Americans.

Join me on Wednesday, August 24, at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive web chat on the topic of Diagnosing, Managing and Living with Arrhythmias. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about arrhythmias, including symptoms, diagnosis, prevention and treatment, as well as innovative new cardiovascular research on the horizon.

You can register online for the live chat! UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Dr. El-Chami

About Mikhael El-Chami, MD

Dr. El-Chami completed his residency at Emory in 2003, and he was nominated for a chief residency year at Emory in 2004. His training in cardiology and electrophysiology also was completed at Emory. His areas of clinical interest include: cardiac arrhythmia ablation, cardiac resynchronization therapy and prevention of sudden cardiac death. Dr. El-Chami holds organizational leadership memberships with the American College of Cardiology and the Heart Rhythm Society. He speaks Arabic and French fluently.