Posts Tagged ‘heart’

Simple Test Can Help Predict Future Risk for Heart Attacks

New research indicates that a blood test that is relatively simple can predict a patient’s risk of suffering a future heart attack. Physicians can determine what patients need more aggressive testing and treatment as well as those who are low – risk patients so they can avoid unnecessary tests. Before this research was completed it was not possible to differentiate a patient with heart disease who was at risk for a future heart attack versus a patient who was not likely to suffer future cardiac events. Therefore, cardiologists are now able to quickly treat the at risk patients and monitor those at lower risk.

Emory cardiologist Arshed Quyyumi, MD and Stephen E. Epstien, MD of MedStar Heart Institute are the senior authors of this research. During the research they studied over 3400 cardiology patients who had confirmed coronary artery disease or suspected disease. Each patient was followed for over 2 years.

Read the full news article and more about the new findings that were published in the Journal of American College of Cardiology.

About Arshed Quyyumi, MD

Dr. Quyyumi is a Professor, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Co-Director, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (ECCRI)

Dr. Arshed A. Quyyumi has been involved in clinical translational research in cardiovascular diseases for over 25 years. Dr. Quyyumi received his undergraduate degree in Pharmacology and medical degree from the University of London, England. He completed his residency at Guy’s and Royal Free Hospitals in London, and cardiology fellowships at National Heart Hospital, London; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; and the National Institutes of Health. After completion of his residency and fellowship, he served in several capacities in the Cardiology Branch of National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH in Bethesda, MD, including Senior Investigator and Director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. In 2001 he was appointed Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, and in 2010 he was named Co-Director of the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (ECCRI). Since 2005, Dr. Quyyumi has been awarded more than $9 million in research funding. He serves on the Editorial Boards of several national journals, is a member on several Scientific Advisory Boards, and is a reviewer for the NIH-NHLBI Study Sections. Dr. Quyyumi has authored more than 180 peer-reviewed publications and has been an invited speaker and session chair at numerous National and International scientific meetings and conferences.

Dr. Quyyumi’s research focus includes vascular biology, angiogenesis, progenitor cell biology, mechanisms of myocardial ischemia, and the role of genetic and environmental risks on vascular disease. Other interests have spanned the fields of personalized medicine and disparities in cardiovascular diseases. During his academic career, Dr. Quyyumi has carried out more than 50 NIH, industry-funded, or investigator-initiated projects, including numerous clinical trials.

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Two Emory Physicians Receive Prestigious Cardiovascular Awards from the American College of Cardiology!

Emory physicians Nanette Wenger, MD and Vinod Thourani, MD were recently awarded prestigious honors from the American College of Cardiology.

Nanette K. Wenger, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, was recently honored by the American College of Cardiology with its inaugural 2013 Distinguished Mentor Award in recognition of her dedication to mentorship and tremendous role in shaping the careers of current and future leaders in cardiology.

“Throughout my career, mentoring women and men in cardiology, including students, residents, cardiology trainees, faculty, and community physicians, has been equally a passion and a reward,” says Wenger. “The science and practice of cardiology will be advanced by its emerging leaders, and it has been my privilege to contribute to their progress.”

Dr. Wenger is internationally recognized as a leading authority on coronary heart disease in women and has accumulated dozens of prestigious awards throughout her career. Her greatest legacy is changing the face of cardiology. In 1993, Wenger coauthored a landmark article in the New England Journal of Medicine that aggressively addressed the prejudice that heart disease was a man’s disease. Research led by Wenger resulted in significant changes to the way drugs and hormones

Dr. Wenger came to Emory University and Grady Memorial Hospital in 1958 and since then she has been a trailblazer and icon in the field of cardiology as author and co-author of more than 1,400 scientific and review articles and book chapters.  Wenger helped write the 2011 Guidelines for Preventing Cardiovascular Disease in Women. In 2009, her fiftieth year at Emory, Wenger’s extraordinary career achievements were celebrated with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American College of Cardiology.

Vinod Thourani, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and cardiothoracic surgeon at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center has been awarded the W. Proctor Harvey, MD, Young Teacher Award at the 2013 American College of Cardiology’s (ACC). He was one of two recipients to receive the prestigious award this year, which is awarded every two years.  The award recognizes and honors a promising young member of the American College of Cardiology who has distinguished him or herself by dedication and skill in teaching, and to stimulate, as far as possible, continued careers in education. Thourani was selected from among a highly competitive group of academic cardiologists to receive the award.

“I am honored to be given this teaching award from the ACC,”” says Thourani, who is an associate professor of surgery, in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. “”Teaching the next generation of physicians, and mentoring them to be the best they can be, is critical in academic medicine, and to the health care system as a whole. I thoroughly enjoy the teaching component of my profession.”

About Dr. Wenger

Dr. Wenger is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and a Consultant to the Emory Heart and Vascular Center. Dr. Wenger is a graduate of Hunter College (summa cum laude) and the Harvard Medical School. She had her residency training in Internal Medicine and Cardiology fellowship at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and additional Fellowship in Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Wenger is a Past Vice-President of the American Heart Association, past Governor for Georgia of the American College of Cardiology, is a Past-President of the Georgia Heart Association. She has served as a member and frequently chairperson of over 500 committees, scientific advisory boards, task forces, and councils of the American Medical Association, the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Society of Geriatric Cardiology. Dr. Wenger is also active in a variety of state and local charitable, cultural, and religious organizations. She is a Fellow of the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology, the Society of Geriatric Cardiology, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and the American College of Chest Physicians. She is a Master of the American College of Physicians. The American Heart Association awarded her the Distinguished Achievement Award, the Women in Cardiology Mentoring Award, and the highest award of the Association, the Gold Heart Award 

About Dr. Thourani

Dr. Thourani specializes in percutaneous transcatheter (transfemoral, transapical, transapical) and minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, minimally invasive mitral valve repair and replacement, aortic valve surgery and ascending aortic aneurysm repair, lone and concomitant atrial fibrillation surgery, and on and off pump coronary artery revascularization. As Associate Director of the Cardiothoracic Surgery Clinical Research Unit, Dr. Thourani is developing innovative strategies and devices to treat cardiothoracic diseases, specifically in the field of structural heart disease and valve surgery. He is a local surgical Co-PI for the multi-center PARTNER transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) trials. PARTNER 1 was instrumental in influencing the FDA’s 2011 approval of the the SAPIEN™ transfemoral transcatheter heart valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. In 2012 Dr. Thourani presented the results of the PARTNER 2 trial, which showed that TAVR was not only as effective as the alternative minimally invasive technique, but might also be safer in the short term. Dr. Thourani is a member of multiple national leadership and publication committees for the treatment of valve surgery using percutaneous or minimally invasive techniques

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Heart Disease is the Number One Killer of Women – Take Action Now to Avoid Being a Statistic!

Many people consider heart disease to be a predominantly male-oriented condition. However, heart disease is the number one killer in women and affects one out of every three in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart.  When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

“The scary thing is that heart attacks in females are more likely to be fatal than in men,” explains Farheen Shirazi, Cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Johns Creek. “Far too often, women ignore the warning signs of a heart attack and do not seek immediate medical attention. As time elapses, the muscles of the heart weaken, causing severe or life-threatening damage.”

Thankfully the awareness about heart disease continues to be on the rise. “The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.”

How can you educate yourself? Join Dr. Shirazi on Tuesday, April 9 for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions such as: what women can do to prevent heart disease, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women.


 About Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Farheen Shirazi, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center.  She specializes in preventive cardiology and heart disease in women.  Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine, her Internship at New York University School of Medicine, her residency at Stanford Hospital and her Fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Shirazi has been practicing at Emory since 2012 and primarily sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Cumming She is passionate about educating women about how to prevent heart disease.

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Welcome Aboard : Dr. Woodhouse and Dr. Shonkoff

Emory Heart & Vascular Center is excited to welcome Dr. Sheila Woodhouse and Dr. David Shonkoff to the Emory team! Doctors, Woodhouse and Shonkoff will practice at 5 locations around Gwinnett County in Duluth (2 locations), Johns Creek, Snellville and Lawrenceville.*

The Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Gwinnett offers a comprehensive spectrum of in-office cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing and treatments. Some of the services the practice will provide cardiology patients are echocardiography, stress echocardiography, nuclear stress testing, treadmill stress testing, carotid duplex ultrasound imaging, ankle-brachial index (ABI) testing and holter and event monitoring.

Dr. Woodhouse specializes in women with heart disease, valve disease and arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, atherosclerotic heart disease and preventive cardiology, risk factor modification management and cardiac related high risk pregnancies and post pardum cardiac care. Impressively, she is triple boarded in cardiovascular imaging modalities and has particular interest in cardiac and vascular imaging.

Dr. Shonkoff specializes in congestive heart failure, heart disease prevention, vavular heart disease, congenital heart disease, refractory hypertension, and cardiac imaging.

Locations
Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Duluth
1845 Satellite Boulevard, Suite 500
Duluth, Georgia 30097

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Johns Creek
6335 Hospital Parkway, Suite 110
Johns Creek, Georgia, 30097

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Eastside
1608 Tree Lane, Suite 101
Snellville, Georgia 30078

Saint Joseph’s Medical Group
4855 RiverGreen Parkway
Duluth, GA 30096

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Lawrenceville
771 Old Norcross Road
Suite 105
Lawrenceville, GA 30046

For hours of operation and to schedule an appointment please call 404-778-6670 or 404-778-6590.

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Join us for a HeartWise Heart Disease Prevention Event in November!

The HeartWise℠ Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Join us for a HeartWise Heart Disease Prevention Event in November! By Kathy Lee Bishop DPT, MS, CCS; Manager, Emory HeartWise Risk Reduction Program

You can also register online here!

ABC’s of Minerals, Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, November 5, 12pm – 12:30pm

WomenHeart of Atlanta: Support Group
Monday, November 12, 12pm – 12:45pm

♥ Do you Know Your Medications?
Thursday, November 15, 8:30am – 9:00am

Got Rhythm? Basic EKGs
Maria Pacheco
Friday, November 16, 12pm – 12:30pm

Advanced Directives for Healthcare and Living Wills
William Sanders, BA, JD, LLM
Monday, November 26, 12pm – 12:30pm

Healthy Eating, Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, November 29, 8:30am – 9:00am

Healthy Holiday Eating, Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, December 3, 12pm – 12:30pm

Admission is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for a HeartWise lecture online.

*If you would like to purchase a t-shirt or calendar where the proceeds go to the HeartWise scholarship fund which allows patients who run into financial challenges continue the wellness and prevention please call 404-778-2850.

Sign up for the November’s Heartwise Events today!

Is Too Much Coffee (Caffeine) Bad for the Heart?

For those of us who frequent the local coffee shop for our morning pick-me-up, the answer to the question, “Too much coffee?” is always a resounding “Never!” But the lasting, jittery feeling really should make you wonder.

While caffeine energizes and rejuvenates, too much of anything is usually not healthy. Each day, about 90 percent of Americans consume caffeine in one form or another. Chances are, if a person consumes more then 400 mg of caffeine per day, they’re likely missing out on other more nutritional beverages and/or skipping meals.

The American Heart Association states that “Many studies have been done to see if there’s a direct link between caffeine, coffee drinking and coronary heart disease. The results are conflicting. This may be due to the way the studies were done and confounding dietary factors. However, moderate coffee drinking (1–2 cups per day) doesn’t seem to be harmful.”
While the caffeine content of coffee is not in and of itself harmful to a person, additives such as the cream, sugar and artificial sweeteners definitely have an impact on the body, especially the heart.  Caffeine stimulates the nervous system, which also speeds up the heart rate. Heavy caffeine consumption has been linked to certain heart problems such as, mild arrhythmia, which is an irregular heartbeat.

“Abnormal heart rhythms, such as Lone Atrial Fibrillation (A-Fib), considered to be the most common, can be trigged by caffeine”, says Dr. Mikhale El-Chami, Cardiologist at Emory University Hospital.

The consumption of caffeine has also been reported to increase the release of fatty acids, decrease sensitivity to insulin, and transiently increase blood pressure. These effects are unfriendly to cardiac health.

If you’re a patient with a heart condition, or if you’re at risk for heart disease, your doctor can help you decide whether or not limiting your caffeine consumption is advisable.

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Your Heart and the Heat

heart-stethoscopeSummer is finally here! Blossoming flowers, chirping birds and clear skies make the summer a sense captivator. With the abundance of renewed energy it brings us, we might take on new challenges of outdoor exploration, or seek outlets for community bonding with the help of festivals, cook outs and reunions. With so many new and exciting activities awaiting us in the summer months, we often forget that with the gorgeous summer days come hot and often humid temperatures.

Most people are familiar with the typical summer health prevention methods of sunscreen protection for the skin, hydration for the body and repellant for our pesky outdoor neighbors— bugs. But, what about the specific needs of our heart during summer months?

As the body tries to cope with changing temperatures, summer can put extra strain on the heart. Most healthy people can tolerate these changes without missing a beat, but these changes can be especially hard for people with heart failure (or those at risk for heart failure), in the hot and humid climate.

The American Heart Association provides some great tips that everyone can use to guide their heart health precaution in the heat:

•    Get off on the right foot. You probably sweat the most in your shoes, so choose well-ventilated shoes and look for socks that repel perspiration. Foot powders and antiperspirants can also help with sweat.

•    Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing in breathable fabrics such as cotton, or a newer fabric that repels sweat. Add a hat and/or sunglasses.

•    Drink up. Before you get started, apply a water-resistant sunscreen with at least SPF 15, and reapply it every two hours. Stay hydrated by drinking a few cups of water before, during and after your exercise. Avoid caffeinated or alcoholic beverages.

•    Take regular breaks. Find some shade or a cool place, stop for a few minutes, hydrate and start again.

If you or someone you know is experiencing the following symptoms, consult with your physician immediately.

Symptoms of Heat Stroke
•    warm, dry skin with no sweating
•    strong and rapid pulse
•    confusion and/or unconsciousness
•    high fever
•    throbbing headaches
•    nausea, vomiting or both

For more information about how to protect your heart from the heat, visit the American Heart Association website, today.

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Get a Heart Healthy Start to 2011!

HeartWise Lecture Series, Emory HealthcareStart 2011 off right by attending a January HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series! HeartWiseSM programming aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also identify people who could be candidates for heart complications in the future, including those who smoke, do not exercise, or have high blood pressure. Admission is free and everyone is welcome.

Nutrition for Heart
Cheryl Williams RD/LD
Monday, January 3, 2011
12:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Healthy Eating Made Easy
Cheryl Williams RD/LD
Monday, January 10, 2011
11:45 AM– 12:15 PM

Fats: The GOOD, the BAD, the UGLY
Cheryl Williams RD/LD
Monday, January 24, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

The Physicians View of the Mediterranean Diet
Dr. Melissa Sinkiewicz
Monday, January 31, 2011
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Lectures are held at The Emory Clinic, 1525 Clifton Road Northeast, on the 5th Floor Conference Room. Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat.

Please feel free to leave a comment if you have any questions or thoughts regarding any of the lectures. We look forward to seeing all of you there!