Posts Tagged ‘Heart Health’

Living in Walk-Friendly Neighborhoods Leads to Heart Healthy Lives

Do you live in an Intown, walkable neighborhood? If so, you may be extending your life!

Dr. Susmita Parashar comments on a new study that indicates there is evidence that people who live in a neighborhood that is very walker friendly live a heart healthier life.   Neighborhoods that have parks, restaurants and grocery stores within walking distance from the homes encourages people to get out and enjoy the outdoor and therefore this benefits the heart.  Check out the CNN Health Minute on Healthy Neighborhoods.

About Susmita Parashar, MD, MS
Dr. Parashar is a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center. She specializes in preventive cardiology and has special interests in women’s heart disease. She is the newest member of the Emory team and looks forward to helping patients in Atlanta prevent heart disease. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, and Cardiology fellowship at Emory University. Prior to joining Emory faculty in the Division of Cardiology, Dr. Parashar was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Medicine at Emory for eight years.

Attend a May HeartWise Event & Improve Your Heart Health!

May Heart Disease Prevention EventsThe HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Admission is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for a HeartWise lecture online.

♥ ABCs of Vitamins
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, May 7, 2012
12:00 PM – 12:30 PM

♥ Heart Healthy Cooking Demo
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Thursday, May 17, 2012
8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

♥ Nutrition Myths
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, May 21, 2012
12:00 PM – 12:30 PM

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our May HeartWise lectures online!

Heart Healthy Cornbread for Your Spring Picnic!

Heart Healthy Cornbread RecipeUse this yummy “Good for you Cornbread” recipe to add a heart healthy option to your spring picnic basket.  It will not only taste great but also provides a heart healthy carbohydrate option.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 cup low-fat (1%) buttermilk
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup soft tub margarine
  • 1 tsp vegetable oil (to grease pan)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350 OF. Mix together cornmeal, flour, sugar, and baking powder. In another bowl, combine buttermilk and egg. Beat lightly. Slowly add buttermilk and egg mixture to dry ingredients. Add margarine and mix by hand or with mixer for 1 minute. Bake for 20-25 minutes in an 8- by 8-inch, greased baking dish. Cool. Cut into 10 squares.

Yield: 10 servings

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1 square)

  • Calories: 178
  • Fat: 6 grams
  • Cholesterol: 22 milligrams
  • Sodium: 94 milligrams

Source: National Institutes of Health – www.nih.gov/ Keep the Beat: Heart Healthy Recipes

Enjoy this recipes and find other heart healthy recipes at  Emory Healthcare’s Recipe’s for Wellness site.

Emory Healthcare is a proud partner of the American Heart Association in the My Heart. My Life campaign that helps consumers learn the 7 simple steps to a healthy lifestyle.

Spring Your Heart into Health – HeartWise Healthy Eating Event

HeartWise Lecture Series AprilThe HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our March HeartWise lectures online!

♥ Chemicals in Food Packaging, What’s the Harm?
Hannah Clark (Kennesaw State University Exercise Specialist Intern)
Friday, April 6, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

♥ Healthy Eating Made Easy
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, April 6, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

AND

Thursday, April 26, 2012
8:45 AM – 9:15 AM

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our April HeartWise lectures online!

8 Creative Ways to Squeeze Fitness into a Busy Schedule

national start walking dayDo you find yourself exhausted after a long day of work or taking care of the kids, and then you don’t feel like exercising? Well, read up for some creative ways to work fitness into your schedule that can be a lot of fun!

  1. Schedule walks with friends instead of grabbing a happy hour drink or dinner! Enjoy the gorgeous outdoors and catch up with a friend at the same time! You will be shocked how quickly time will fly when you are catching up with an old friend.
  2. Instead of sleeping in, take your kids or dogs to a National Park on a Saturday morning. Georgia has some incredible National Parks – visit http://usparks.about.com/od/travelitineraries/l/blGeorgia-National-Parks.htm. You will be amazed how being out in nature will improve your mood!
  3. While watching TV, instead of lying on the couch, lie down on the ground and do some sit ups, planks or light weights while watching your favorite show for 10 minutes.
  4. Add a little dancing to your cleaning routine! Turn on music and add a bob to your step as you clean around the house. This will burn extra calories while you are dancing.
  5. Instead of driving to the park, local restaurant or neighbor’s house – walk there! You will be able to really take in all that your neighborhood has to offer. The kids also will learn at an early age to enjoy the outdoors and exercise.
  6. Set your alarm for 15 – 20 minutes earlier than normal and go for a short walk/jog around the neighborhood. You not only will feel better, you will have gotten your metabolic system in action and don’t have to worry about trying to fit a workout in after a long, hard day! Try to make it a habit to exercise at least 10 minutes every morning! It will start your day off right.
  7. Always take the stairs instead of the elevator if you are going four flights or less! Make it a contest at work and challenge your colleagues to go further!
  8. Volunteer to walk your neighbor’s dog. Seeing a walk through a dog’s eyes makes the adventure that much fun!

Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2008), the American Heart Association and American College of Sports Medicine (2007) state that even short activities performed in 10 minute segments can improve your health. These organizations recommend getting about 2 and one-half hours of exercise over the course of a week!April 4 is National Start Walking Day. Grab a buddy and get your body in motion! Your heart will thank you for it! Emory University and Healthcare employees – get your walking shoes out and meet us for a 30-minute walk on Wednesday, April 4, at one of the following locations:

  • Emory University Hospital Midtown, 2:00 pm – meet at the fountain between the Orr and Glenn Buildings
  • Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, 12:00 pm – meet near the entrance to the Medical Office Building
  • Lullwater Preserve, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet at the gates to Lullwater Park
  • Grady, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet in the Faculty Office Building lobby
  • Saint Joseph’s Hospital, 10:00 am and 10:45 am – meet in the meditation garden between the Harrison Outpatient Building and the Florence Erb Hayes Specialty Center
  • The Carter Center,12:25 pm – meet in the parking lot staff entrance

For more information, please contact Melissa Morgan, melissa.morgan@emory.edu or 404-727-4328.

If you are not an Emory employee and want to get your organization involved in National Start Walking Day, contact the American Heart Association by visiting www.startwalkingnow.org and request a toolkit.

 

Ready, Set, Walk!

National Start Walking DayWednesday, April 4, 2012 is National Start Walking Day! Emory University and Emory Healthcare employees – get your walking shoes out and meet us for a 30-minute walk on Wednesday, April 4, at one of the following locations:

  • Emory University Hospital Midtown, 2:00 pm – meet at the fountain between the Orr and Glenn Buildings
  • Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, 12:00 pm – meet near the entrance to the Medical Office Building
  • Lullwater Preserve, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet at the gates to Lullwater Park
  • Grady, 11:45 am and 12:30 pm – meet in the Faculty Office Building lobby
  • Saint Joseph’s Hospital, 10:00 am and 10:45 am – meet in the meditation garden between the Harrison
  • The Carter Center,12:25 pm – meet in the parking lot staff entrance Outpatient Building and the Florence Erb Hayes Specialty Center

For more information, please contact Melissa Morgan, melissa.morgan@emory.edu or 404-727-4328.

If you are not an Emory employee and want to get your organization involved in National Start Walking Day, contact the American Heart Association by visiting www.startwalkingnow.org and request a toolkit.

Take a step to better health and start walking!

Patient Story: Cardiac Robotics as an Alternative to Open Heart Surgery

Barry Chaney is an Emory Heart & Vascular Center patient and Emory Healthcare employee who after having chest pains while working out was told he had to have cardiac bypass surgery to relieve blockages in his heart.

Barry chose the robotic approach to surgery as opposed to traditional cardiac open heart surgery because of the less invasive nature and faster recovery time associated with robotic surgery.  Barry returned to work after 3 weeks and is now back to living an active life! Learn more about cardiac robotic surgery and Barry’s experience with the procedure by watching his amazing story video story below:

Related Resources:

March into Better Heart Health!

Heart events in Atlanta March 2012The HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our March HeartWise lectures online!

Emory HeartWise Events in Atlanta during March:

♥ Diabetes Prevention
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Thursday, March 8, 2012
8:45 AM – 9:15 AM

♥ Healthy Cooking Demo
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, March 12, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

♥ Dancing For Health
Ashley Cole, Valdosta State University Exercise Specialist Intern
Friday, March 23, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

♥ High Blood Pressure & Nutrition
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, March 26, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

♥ Why Sleep is So Important
Friday, March 26, 2012
11:45 AM – 12:15 PM

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our March HeartWise lectures online!

Don’t Let Your Stress Levels Stress Your Heart

Stress & Heart Disease Chat Sign Up

Join Emory Heart & Vascular Center preventive heart disease specialist Susmita Parashar, MD to learn about how stress can contribute to heart disease. Dr. Parashar will participate in a free live web chat on Tuesday, February 28, 2012 and will be available to provide information linking stress to heart disease as well as answer questions on how to best balance your life to reduce stress. The chat will begin at 12:30pm EST.

Register for the Stress & Heart Disease Web Chat: UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

 


About Dr. Susmita Parashar

Dr. Susmita Parashar

Dr. Susmita Parashar is a Board certified cardiologist at the Emory Heart and Vascular Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine. Prior to joining as faculty in the Division of Cardiology, Dr Parashar was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Medicine at Emory for 8 years. She applies her experience as a Board certified internist in providing a holistic care to patients. She was awarded the American Heart Association (AHA) Trudy Bush Fellowship for Cardiovascular Research in Women’s Health Award to recognize outstanding work in the area of women’s health and cardiovascular disease and Emory Department of Medicine Early Career Faculty Research Award for Clinical Research.

Dr Parashar completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Medical College of Georgia, Augusta and Cardiology fellowship at Emory University. She completed her Master of Public Health and a Master of Science from Emory in 2005. A passionate clinician-researcher and educator, she trains medical students, residents and cardiology fellows. In addition, she conducts clinical research. Dr Parashar’s clinical and research focus is in preventive cardiology with a focus on women and cardiovascular diseases.

She has received several grants and awards from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the AHA to conduct research on women and heart disease. She has served as Emory principal investigator for large NIH funded clinical research for heart attack patients. She was also invited to participate as a co-investigator for the NIH funded Cardiovascular Health Study for older adults. She has presented her work in national and international scientific meetings, including the AHA Annual Session, AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke, American College of Cardiology Annual Session, Society of General Internal Medicine and International Congress of Coronary Heart Disease.

Dr. Parashar has authored/coauthored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, including invited textbook chapters, manuscripts, abstracts and review articles. Her work has been published in such prestigious journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine and Circulation, and highlighted by the Nature and national media such as CNN, CBS and NPR news.

She believes in family-career balance and applies her experience as a mother of two young children and wife to her work.


Dark Chocolate: The Heart Healthy Gift for Your Valentine

Dark Chocolate ValentineAs Valentine’s Day approaches, Saint Joseph’s cardiologist Jason Reingold, MD, says go ahead and give your sweetheart some dark chocolate this year – to consume in moderation.

In the past year, more research has suggested a beneficial link between higher levels of chocolate consumption and the reduction of the risk of cardiovascular events. In one study, participants with the highest levels of chocolate intake had a 37 percent reduction in cardiovascular disease and a 29 percent reduction in stroke compared with participants who consumed the lowest levels of chocolate.

The secret behind chocolate’s beneficial effects on the heart is the effect of powerful micronutrients – flavonoids and phenols found naturally in the cocoa bean. These compounds function like antioxidants found in fruits and vegetables where free radicals are neutralized and destroyed, helping the body resist damage to cells. For example, flavanols help keep LDL cholesterol from becoming oxidized and clogging up coronary artery walls.

Studies also suggest that the phenols found in dark chocolate may help lower blood pressure by an average of 5 points for systolic and an average of 2 points for diastolic blood pressure. Improvement in blood pressure has been found in people who consumed as little as 3 1/2 ounces of dark chocolate every day for 15 days. But, the effect may be short lived as one study found that after only two days without chocolate blood pressure returned to previous higher levels.

Finally, researchers believe that dark chocolate can help improve endothelial function. This refers to the cells that line the blood vessels to help keep them dilated and elastic. Coupled with reducing inflammation, normal endothelial function promotes free flowing blood and prevents platelets from sticking together and forming a clot which can lead to stroke and heart attack.

Unfortunately, there can be a down side to the chocolate we eat every day. First, as chocolate is processed to eliminate the natural bitter flavor, the beneficial flavonoids and phenols are also removed. Second, the chocolate we consume is usually processed with excess fat and sugar. These extra calories can lead to obesity and diabetes, which can reverse any positive effects that chocolate may have on the heart.

So, like all things in life, the best solution is to eat dark chocolate in moderation:

  • Look for a cocoa content of at least 65 percent and remember the higher the better in terms of flavonoids and phenols. Milk chocolate has lower levels of cocoa, and white chocolate does not contain any cocoa. Even worse, both have more fat and sugar than dark chocolate.
  • Limit yourself to no more than 3 ounces (85 grams) a day
  • Balance the extra calories from chocolate by eliminating calories from your diet
  • Don’t wash down your chocolate with milk, as it may interfere with the absorption of antioxidants from chocolate
  • Don’t forget about other sources of flavonoids and phenols like fruits, vegetables and red wine

About Dr. Reingold—Dr. Reingold is a board certified cardiologist who specializes in preventive cardiology at Saint Joseph’s Heart and Vascular Institute. He is the chairmen of research for the Womens Heart Center and active investigator within the Saint Joseph’s Research Institute.  Dr. Reingold has been featured on CNN’s health program Sanjay Gupta, MD, and is well published in medical literature.