Posts Tagged ‘Heart Failure’

Types of Cardiovascular Disease

heart-word-cloud 9-4Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. But did you know there are more than 50 types of heart disease? Heart disease is actually an umbrella term that includes a number of conditions affecting the structures or function of the heart, some of which are genetic, and many of which are the result of lifestyle choices.

Types of Cardiovascular Disease:

Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common form of heart disease. It occurs when the arteries supplying blood to the heart narrow or harden, which is known as atherosclerosis. CHD is usually the cause of heart attack, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease. Major risk factors include: high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, diabetes, advancing age, inherited (genetic) disposition.

Heart Attack – Also called “myocardial infarction,” a heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart is severely reduced or cut off, due to the hardening and narrowing of the coronary arteries from the build-up of fat, cholesterol, and other substances, known together as “plaque.” A blood clot forms around the plaque, blocking blood flow. This results in permanent damage or death of part of the heart muscle. The most common symptoms of a heart attack are:

  • Chest pressure or pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, back, arms or shoulder
  • Feeling weak, lightheaded, or nauseous

Arrhythmia – “Arrhythmia” means your heartbeat is irregular. It doesn’t necessarily mean your heart is beating too fast or too slow. It just means it’s out of its normal rhythm. When the heart doesn’t beat normally, it can’t pump blood effectively to the lungs, brain, and other organs, causing them to potentially shut down or become damaged. You could have an arrhythmia even if your heart is healthy, as it can be a side effect of medicines that you are taking or a manifestation of an abnormality elsewhere in your body.

Heart failure is a serious condition that commonly develops slowly over time, and is the leading cause of hospitalization in people older than 65. Heart failure is a bit of a misnomer, since it does not actually mean the heart has stopped working; rather, the heart pumps weaker than normal, causing blood to move through the body at a slower rate and increases pressures in the heart. The weakened heart muscle has to work overtime to keep up with the body’s demands, which can leave a person tired. Some of the symptoms of heart failure:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Difficulty breathing when lying down
  • Swelling in the legs, ankles, and feet
  • General fatigue and weakness

Congenital Heart Disease is a category of heart disease in which congenital heart defects are present at birth. Defects occur when the fetus is developing and may produce symptoms at birth or during childhood, while others aren’t discovered until a person is an adult. Some causes of congenital heart defects are:

  • Chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome
  • Maternal viral infection in the first trimester of pregnancy
  • Maternal drug or alcohol abuse during pregnancy, and certain medications such as Warfarin

Heart Muscle Disease (Cardiomyopathy) is a progressive disease that causes the heart to be abnormally enlarged, thickened and/or stiffened. Cardiomyopathy limits the heart’s ability to pump blood effectively, and often leads to heart conditions like arrhythmias or heart failure.

While there is a wide range of heart and vascular conditions associated with cardiovascular disease, the good news is that many types of heart disease can be prevented with healthy habits. You can reduce your risk of certain types of heart disease, such as heart attack, coronary artery disease and peripheral artery disease by doing the following:

  • Eating a low sodium diet
  • Eating more fresh fruit and vegetables while limiting foods high in saturated fat
  • Exercising at least 3 – 5 times a week for 30 minutes a day
  • Stop smoking!
  • Controlling your diabetes and high blood pressure

If you suspect you have heart condition, talk with a trained Emory Healthcare doctor, who can recommend or administer screening or diagnostic tests.

About Dr. Danny Eapen, MD

eapen-dannyDanny Eapen, MD  is an Assistant Professor at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Eapen specializes in preventive cardiology and adult heart disease. He pursued a degree in medicine from the University of Miami, Miami FL, and his internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. He also completed his research and general cardiology fellowship at Emory University.

Welcoming New Medical Director of the Saint Joseph’s Hospital Heart Failure Clinic


Dr. David Markham, MD, MSc

Emory Center for Heart Failure and Transplantation and Saint Joseph’s Hospital are pleased to welcome David Markham, MD, MSc, to the team as the medical director of the Heart Failure Clinic at Saint Joseph’s Hospital.

Markham is an experienced heart failure and transplant cardiologist and has performed groundbreaking work in the area of assist device physiology.

“I’m excited that Dr. Markham will be leading heart failure services and our partnership with Saint Joseph’s,” says Andrew Smith, MD, director of the Center for Heart Failure and Transplantation and chief of cardiology at Emory University Hospital. “He will continue the progress we’ve already made over the past few months with the Advanced Heart Failure Network and the consolidation of services for network patients at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Saint Joseph’s Hospital. These steps benefit our patients and enhance the services we offer.”

Markham received his undergraduate and medical degrees from Emory in 1991 and 1995, respectively and is a native of Marietta, GA. He completed an internship and residency at the University of Virginia, a post-doctoral fellowship in clinical and molecular cardiology at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and a fellowship in cardiology with advanced training in heart failure and cardiac transplantation at Duke University Medical Center.

Before his return to Emory, Markham was medical director of the Heart Failure Clinic at Parkland Memorial Hospital and associate director of heart failure, assist devices and cardiac transplantation at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

About the Emory and Saint Joseph’s Center for Advanced Heart Failure

The Advanced Heart Failure Network is an enhanced cardiac collaboration that includes expert care from subspecialists at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Saint Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta. For over 20 years Emory Healthcare and Saint Joseph’s Hospital have had the largest advanced heart failure programs in Georgia. The new collaboration will focus on meeting the needs of patients and their families dealing with heart failure. Patients in need of advanced heart failure management, medical and surgical management of other heart conditions and related therapies, may now access treatment at any of the three facilities.

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Emory Honored with International Heart Failure Research Grant!

Emory is one of 17 collaborating centers from 10 countries participating in a new international consortium project aimed at earlier detection and prevention of heart failure.

The European Commission has awarded a grant of almost $16 million (EUR 12 million) to the Heart Omics in Ageing (HOMAGE) project, with a goal of better identifying more specific biomarkers for heart failure and then developing methods for earlier detection of risk in the elderly population.

A biomarker, or biological marker, is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. It serves as a guide for health and physiology related assessments.

The prevalence of heart failure is increasing worldwide because of the aging population and a rising trend of risk factors for heart disease — such as diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Heart failure is a major cause of death and disability in the world and remains the most frequent cause of hospitalization for patients over 65 years old. An essential step in preventing heart failure is to first accurately identify individuals at high-risk.

Traditional risk factors such as high blood pressure still remain important clinical guides but we are now seeing more cases of heart failure develop in individuals who do not have any specific high risk diseases. Therefore, this research will try to determine more accurate methods of detecting heart failure risk using biomarkers leveraging the latest technology.

This project will evaluate data from 30,000 patients from 10 countries. Emory investigators will work with the National Institutes of Aging-funded Health Aging and Body Composition Study, to assess the value of this approach among 3,000 elderly individuals in the U.S.

HOMAGE will also lead a clinical trial to look for novel treatments of heart failure that can be targeted specifically to those patients at risk.

This research has the potential to benefit thousands of individuals in the U.S. and researchers at Emory are very excited to work with colleagues across Europe in this trans-Atlantic collaboration.

About Dr. Javed Butler
Professor of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine
Director of Heart Failure Research at Emory

After completing medical school from Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan, Dr. Butler did his residency and chief residency at Yale University, Masters in Public Health from Harvard University, and cardiology fellowship including transplant training at Vanderbilt University. Before moving to Emory University, he was the director for the Heart and Heart-Lung Transplant programs at Vanderbilt University. He also has done special cardiac imaging training at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He is on the Editorial Board for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Journal of Cardiac Failure, American Heart Journal and Congestive Heart Failure. He served on the American College of Cardiology Committee on Heart Failure and Transplantation. He is board certified in Cardiology, Internal Medicine, and Nuclear Cardiology. Currently he serves as the Deputy Chief Science Advisor for the American Heart Association. While also heavily involved in research and clinical care at Emory. Dr. Butler’s research focuses primarily on the disease progression, outcomes, and prognosis determination in patients with heart failure, with special emphasis on patients undergoing cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist device placement. He has published many original research articles in multiple peer reviewed journals. He serves on the national board, events committee, and steering committees of several multicenter clinical trials. Dr. Butler is involved in the evaluation and management of all aspects of patients with heart failure including cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist devices. He is also involved in the cardiac CT program at Emory University.

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Heart Disease is the Number One Killer of Women – Take Action Now to Avoid Being a Statistic!

Many people consider heart disease to be a predominantly male-oriented condition. However, heart disease is the number one killer in women and affects one out of every three in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart.  When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

“The scary thing is that heart attacks in females are more likely to be fatal than in men,” explains Farheen Shirazi, Cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Johns Creek. “Far too often, women ignore the warning signs of a heart attack and do not seek immediate medical attention. As time elapses, the muscles of the heart weaken, causing severe or life-threatening damage.”

Thankfully the awareness about heart disease continues to be on the rise. “The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.”

How can you educate yourself? Join Dr. Shirazi on Tuesday, April 9 for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions such as: what women can do to prevent heart disease, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women.

 About Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Farheen Shirazi, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center.  She specializes in preventive cardiology and heart disease in women.  Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine, her Internship at New York University School of Medicine, her residency at Stanford Hospital and her Fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Shirazi has been practicing at Emory since 2012 and primarily sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Cumming She is passionate about educating women about how to prevent heart disease.

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Welcome Aboard : Dr. Woodhouse and Dr. Shonkoff

Emory Heart & Vascular Center is excited to welcome Dr. Sheila Woodhouse and Dr. David Shonkoff to the Emory team! Doctors, Woodhouse and Shonkoff will practice at 5 locations around Gwinnett County in Duluth (2 locations), Johns Creek, Snellville and Lawrenceville.*

The Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Gwinnett offers a comprehensive spectrum of in-office cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing and treatments. Some of the services the practice will provide cardiology patients are echocardiography, stress echocardiography, nuclear stress testing, treadmill stress testing, carotid duplex ultrasound imaging, ankle-brachial index (ABI) testing and holter and event monitoring.

Dr. Woodhouse specializes in women with heart disease, valve disease and arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, atherosclerotic heart disease and preventive cardiology, risk factor modification management and cardiac related high risk pregnancies and post pardum cardiac care. Impressively, she is triple boarded in cardiovascular imaging modalities and has particular interest in cardiac and vascular imaging.

Dr. Shonkoff specializes in congestive heart failure, heart disease prevention, vavular heart disease, congenital heart disease, refractory hypertension, and cardiac imaging.

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Duluth
1845 Satellite Boulevard, Suite 500
Duluth, Georgia 30097

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Johns Creek
6335 Hospital Parkway, Suite 110
Johns Creek, Georgia, 30097

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Eastside
1608 Tree Lane, Suite 101
Snellville, Georgia 30078

Saint Joseph’s Medical Group
4855 RiverGreen Parkway
Duluth, GA 30096

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Lawrenceville
771 Old Norcross Road
Suite 105
Lawrenceville, GA 30046

For hours of operation and to schedule an appointment please call 404-778-6670 or 404-778-6590.

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True Coordination of Care: Our New Advanced Heart Failure Program

Advanced Heart Failure ProgramWe’ve experienced quite a bit of growth and expansion over the last few years here at Emory Healthcare, and with that growth, our patients are continually afforded a more collaborative and integrated total care experience. When Saint Joseph’s Hospital became part of the Emory Healthcare family earlier this year, for example, two of the state’s leading heart and vascular care providers became one, making comprehensive cardiac care a seamless process for our patients.

Every day we take steps to make receiving care at any one of our Emory Healthcare facilities more convenient and our latest effort has resulted in one of the most comprehensive heart failure treatment programs in the country. The new Advanced Heart Failure Program, is a cardiac network that includes the expert care from subspecialists at Emory University Hospital (EUH), Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUHM) and Saint Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta.

For over 20 years Emory Healthcare and Saint Joseph’s Hospital have had the largest advanced heart failure programs in Georgia and the new collaboration will focus on meeting the needs of patients and referring physicians across the Southeast. EUH, EUHM and Saint Joseph’s have established cultures of excellent multidisciplinary care with emphasis on the lives of patients and families dealing with heart failure. We are excited to expand the bond of physicians, nurses, dietitians, social workers, and others in improving outcomes for those we serve.

The surgical heart transplant services at Saint Joseph’s Hospital will be the only component of its current heart failure program to move to a new campus—transplants now will be performed by Emory Transplant Center surgeons only at Emory University Hospital. Heart failure patients will receive pre- and post-operative care from their physician of choice at Saint Joseph’s, EUH and EUHM. Patients in need of advanced heart failure management, medical and surgical management of all heart conditions and related therapies may access treatment at any of the three facilities. Saint Joseph’s patients on the heart transplant wait list are in the process of being transferred to transplant centers of their choice, including Emory. Their status and place on the wait list will not be impacted since it is regulated by UNOS.

The program’s services also will include the surgical implantation of ventricular assist devices (VADs) at Emory University Hospital and Saint Joseph’s—a growing enterprise because of improved technology—and the medical management of VADs at all three hospitals.

The goal of the program is for all of our heart failure and transplant patients to experience enhanced coordination of their overall care and increased communication between their medical and surgical specialists.

The program currently has five cardiologists who are certified in advanced heart failure and transplantation and a number of other cardiologists pursuing certification who will be available to see patients. The Emory School of Medicine has an accredited advanced heart failure and transplantation fellowship training program for cardiologists. In addition, Emory is one of only nine centers in the country that is a member of the Heart Failure Clinical Research Network (HFCRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Earlier this year, Emory received a seven-year, $2.7 million grant to develop heart failure clinical trials, with additional funding down the road to carry them out. Dr. Javed Butler, professor of cardiology, is principal investigator. As part of our new merger, Saint Joseph’s will participate in upcoming HFCRN trials, too.


About Andy Smith, MD, Director of Heart Failure and Transplantation, Bahgat/Smith Endowed Chair in Heart Failure Therapy and chief of cardiology at EUH

Dr. Andrew Lee Smith, Emory HealthcareAndrew Lee Smith, MD joined Emory University’s faculty in 1992 and established the Center for Heart Failure Therapy and Transplantation, a specialty practice for treatment of patients with heart failure in all stages (early to end stage) of the disease. Under his leadership, heart failure outpatient visits have surpassed 5000 annually, over 500 heart transplant procedures have been performed since the program began, and the Ventricular Assist Device program is strong and growing. Dr. Smith is recognized as an innovative leader in the treatment of heart failure and most notably for his work in collaboration with electrophysiologists on cardiac resynchronization therapy which lead to FDA approval for these devices. To learn more about Andrew Lee Smith, MD, check out Dr. Smith’s physician profile.

Understanding Cardiac Arrest in Athletes Such as Fabrice Muamba

Fabrice Muamba

Source: CNN

Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist Chandan Devireddy, MD recently sat down with the team at CNN to discuss what likely happened to English soccer player, Fabrice Muamba, when he collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest during a game earlier this month.

In the CNN interview, Dr. Devireddy also the cautions and guidelines athletes need to take to diagnose and prevent sudden cardiac death. To get Dr. Devireddy’s full take on cardiac arrest and athletes, check out his interview with CNN here.

Emory’s Heart & Vascular Center is consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top heart health centers in the nation. The Emory Heart & Vascular Center offers services that cover the entire continuum of care, from prevention and early detection to the latest in cardiovascular treatment. In fact, Emory has one of the few dedicated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy clinics (HCM) in the US. Emory’s specialized HCM center offers comprehensive care (surgery, interventional cardiology, genetic testing, etc.), as well as greater experience and expertise.

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A Very Special Thanksgiving For Sean Dookwah

It’s been a busy last few weeks at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center. Earlier in November, we shared with you a story of a recent milestone for our Heart & Vascular program when Emory physicians completed their 200th Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement. Milestones such as this one have tremendous implications for our patient community. We are consistently putting into practice innovative technology that means longer, fuller lives for our patients. For Sean Dookwah, from Athens, Georgia, this notion rings especially true this holiday season. Sean will be able to enjoy his first Thanksgiving holiday with a new lease on life after Emory physicians implanted his new ventricular assist heart device at Emory University Hospital. Sean’s VAD implant was the 100th such procedure performed at Emory.

The first ventricular assist device was implanted in Georgia at Emory in 2006 as a form of destination therapy (in place of a donor transplant) for individuals who are not eligible for–or unable to undergo–a heart transplant. Ventricular assist devices are battery-operated mechanical pumps that help a weakened heart pump blood throughout the body. They are most commonly used as a bridge to transplant for those whose medical therapy has failed and who are hospitalized with end-stage heart failure. More recently, the VAD is providing an alternative to transplant. VADs allow a near normal quality of life, with most patients returning home with their families while they wait for a donor heart to become available.

Sean Dookwah, Emory Patient

Sean Dookwah at Emory University Hospital

Sean, who is 39 years old, began his journey to receiving his ventricular assist device and returning home to his family just two years ago. He had spent years as a construction worker, which kept him fairly active and fit. But after pursuing an office-based career in IT, Sean fell into a more sedentary lifestyle, which included lack of exercise, poor eating habits, long, stressful hours, all accompanied by a 20-year smoking habit.

It was in 2009 that Sean began to feel weak and ill enough to justify a visit to his local emergency room in Athens. “I felt weak, tired, sick, terrible. I was not having a heart attack, but it was there that I was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy, which is basically a weakening of my heart. That was a wake-up call,” says Sean.

After receiving the news, Sean moved in with his family and immediately adopted a healthier lifestyle, which included exercise, healthier eating, and dropping the smoking habit. Within about 18 months he dropped almost 150 pounds – from 480 to a current 330 pounds. He attributes much of his success in turning around his lifestyle to his friends and family.

“My friends and family have been incredible help and an inspiration to me – helping to keep me encouraged and on track, and some of my friends have even quit smoking themselves – both for me and them. I hope to eventually be added to a heart transplant list, but I have some work to do to still lose weight and get down to a healthier frame.”

And after his successful ventricular assist device implantation just a few days ago, Sean is eager to return home to his family for the the Thanksgiving Holiday and continue making healthy progress and enjoy his already drastically improved health. “I feel incredible compared to where I was just a few weeks ago. I was so tired and weak I couldn’t walk from one part of the room to the other,” Sean says. “Today, I feel alert, strong, healthy and like I could run a marathon. It’s amazing, and I am definitely thankful for everyone who made this possible for me – from the doctors and nurses at Emory – to my friends and family. I can’t wait to get home.”

It is milestones like our 100th VAD implant and stories such as Sean’s that make us especially thankful for the positive impact our team is able to have on our community. “Until fairly recently, surgeons have been implanting VADs as a temporary bridge to heart transplantation. We now have the ability to also offer those patients who are unable to undergo a heart transplant to dramatically improve the quality with what we refer to as destination therapy – meaning the device will stay with the patient indefinitely,” remarks David Vega, MD, professor of surgery and director of the heart transplant program in the Emory Transplant Center.

“This technology offers new hope and a much greater quality of life. And with more than five million Americans who suffer from congestive heart failure, with another half million diagnosed each year, this device is a viable, and often-times live-saving – option for our patients,” Vega continued.

Sean will be released for home today, one day before Thanksgiving and just a few days after his procedure, where he will join his family and friends for what very likely will be the most thankful of holidays.

We too are thankful to have the opportunity to improve the lives of people like Sean. And for those of us that are part of the Emory team, but are not in clinical roles, we are tremendously grateful for and appreciative of our researchers and care teams who make saving lives like Sean’s possible.

Happy holidays everyone.

Heart Transplant Patient Success Story

Dr. Vega, Emory Heart and VascularHerbert Grable was diagnosed in 2000 with congestive heart failure. When he was diagnosed, it came as a shock and he was scared. He didn’t know what caused his heart to fail and he didn’t know what heart failure treatments were available for him. He was very grateful to have the Emory Heart & Vascular Center near his home, as it offered a unique treatment for patients who are not candidates or can’t get a heart transplant right away – called Ventricular Assist Devices (VAD).

As we have discussed in previous blogs, a VAD is a mechanical device that is implanted in the heart. This pump takes over the function for the ventricle and circulates blood to the rest of the body. The goal of a VAD is to improve a patient’s survival and quality of life while they wait for a transplant (if they are a candidate for a transplant). The number of heart failure patients is tremendous, and with the number of transplants regulated per year at around 2,500 the VAD is another option for non-transplantable candidates as well.

After receiving the VAD, Herbert smiled and joked that he felt like himself again. His wife commented that the she got the “old Herbert back.” After eight months with the VAD, Herbert was again upgraded to the transplant list. One week later, he received the call  from Emory Transplant Center that a heart was available for him. Before transplant, Herbert was scared but he had faith in Emory and was determined that everything would work out. His wife was hopeful and optimistic that Herbert would be with her for many more years and would possibly see some grand kids one day.

Transplants are complex procedures. Emory transplant physicians are experts in their field and aware of all possible nuances that occur with each individual transplant patient. Should an unusual complication arise during a transplant experience, Emory has the skill to reach the most optimal outcome for a patient.

After Herbert received the heart transplant, he was able to live a normal lifestyle and do everything he always did before he was diagnosed with heart failure. He sums up his care “Emory is not just hospital, they care about the patient as well. I am so glad to have a place like Emory to treat me for this condition.”

For more information about heart transplant after the VAD procedure, watch this video:

About Dr. Vega

Dr. David Vega is a cardiothoracic surgeon at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center and the Director of Emory’s Heart Transplant program at Emory University Hospital. He implanted Georgia’s first dual pump ventricular assist device (VAD) in 1999 to serve as a bridge to heart transplantation, a procedure that initiated Emory’s ongoing national position at the forefront of the use of mechanical circulatory assist devices. In 2006, he implanted the state’s first VAD as a form of destination therapy for individuals who are ineligible for or are unwilling to undergo a heart transplant, and in 2007 he implanted an even smaller VAD for the same purpose that featured an automatic speed control mode designed to regulate pumping activity based on different levels of patient or cardiac activity.

Heart Failure – What Should I Know?

Sonjoy Laskar MD

A heart failure diagnosis may sound frightening, but with the right treatment, heart failure can be controlled. Once you are on a stable medical regimen, you can often return to a full and enjoyable life. With the recent passing of actress and icon, Elizabeth Taylor, we would like to take some time to provide some information about congestive heart failure.


  • Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) affects nearly 5 million Americans
  • Approximately 550,000 new cases are diagnosed in the U.S. each year.
  • Congestive heart failure affects people of all ages, from children and young adults to the middle-aged and the elderly.
  • Almost 1.4 million persons with CHF are under 60 years of age.
  • CHF is present in 2 percent of persons age 40 to 59.
  • More than 5 percent of persons age 60 to 69 have CHF.
  • CHF annual incidence approaches 10 per 1,000 population after 65 years of age.
  • The incidence of CHF is equally frequent in men and women, and African-Americans are 1.5 times more likely to develop heart failure than Caucasians.
  • More than half of those who develop CHF die within 5 years of diagnosis.


  • Shortness of breath with little exertion
  • Feeling weak or tired after little activity or exertion
  • Difficulty sleeping due to breathing problems
  • A new or different cough, especially while lying flat
  • A swollen and/or tender abdomen
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased urination at night
  • Swelling of the feet and legs

Early diagnosis and treatment for heart failure is very important. Heart failure is a chronic condition that may follow a varied and unpredictable course. If you are experiencing heart failure symptoms, you should see your cardiologist. If you have been diagnosed with heart failure, adhering to the treatment plan designed by your doctors and nurses can help you navigate this challenge. Your symptoms can be controlled with proper medical care.

About Sonjoy Laskar, MD:
Dr. Laskar joined Emory Healthcare in 2005 and has devoted his career to providing direct care to patients with heart failure, heart transplantation and ventricular assist devices, as well as to teaching residents and fellows. He is an active researcher in the areas of echocardiography and ventricular assist devices as destination therapy, and is a member of the American College of Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America and the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation