Posts Tagged ‘Heart Disease’

Atlanta: 5 Opportunities to Reduce Your Risk for Heart Disease in June!

June Heart Disease Prevention EventsThe HeartWise℠ Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

You can register for our HeartWise events online!

Foods that Fight Prostate Cancer
Tasha Mickens, RD, LD, CDE
Monday, June 17, 12pm – 12:30pm

Fundamentals of Strength Training 
Clay Knight
Monday, June 24, 12pm – 12:30pm

Understanding Heart Disease in Women

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi, Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist, recently conducted a live web chat on the topic of women and heart disease. During the chat, Dr. Shirazi provided participants with information ranging from how women can prevent heart disease to the importance of getting treatment right away, and details on the latest research underway to combat heart disease in women.

One of our attendees in Tuesday’s chat asked Dr. Shirazi, “What is the best diet for patients with heart disease?” Dr. Shirazi noted that the most effective diet will depend on each person’s specific risk factors for heart disease, but in general, the most recent evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet is heart healthy. Dr. Shirazi explained that the Mediterranean Diet is rich in lean protein (poultry), good fats (olive oil) and omega-3s (fatty fish), and low in saturated fats and bad carbohydrates. And like any healthy diet, the Mediterranean Diet is low in sodium and loaded with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Another great question fielded by Dr. Shirazi in Tuesday’s live chat was related to symptoms and warning signs of heart disease, “I have read that symptoms of coronary heart disease are different in woman than in men, but when symptoms present, at what point should you seek medical attention? I sometimes feel chest discomfort, even sharp pains, but how will I know if it’s more serious than say stress for example?” Dr. Shirazi says patients should trust their instincts if something doesn’t “feel right,” in which case, Dr. Shirazi recommends seeing a medical professional. “A provider will be able to evaluate your symptoms and do appropriate screening. If you’re having any symptoms such as: chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, excessive fatigue, dizziness, loss of consciousness, or abdominal pain (to list a few), you should see your primary care physician. Your cardiologist will then be able to further assess your risk for heart disease,” she says.

In addition to the questions above, Dr. Shirazi answered questions related to cholesterol levels, hormone replacement therapy, and several other topics specific to heart disease in women. Most importantly, though, she reminded participants to take action immediately if they are at risk for, or experiencing symptoms of, heart disease.

For more information, check out the Women and Heart Disease chat transcript.

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Emory Honored with International Heart Failure Research Grant!

Emory is one of 17 collaborating centers from 10 countries participating in a new international consortium project aimed at earlier detection and prevention of heart failure.

The European Commission has awarded a grant of almost $16 million (EUR 12 million) to the Heart Omics in Ageing (HOMAGE) project, with a goal of better identifying more specific biomarkers for heart failure and then developing methods for earlier detection of risk in the elderly population.

A biomarker, or biological marker, is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. It serves as a guide for health and physiology related assessments.

The prevalence of heart failure is increasing worldwide because of the aging population and a rising trend of risk factors for heart disease — such as diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Heart failure is a major cause of death and disability in the world and remains the most frequent cause of hospitalization for patients over 65 years old. An essential step in preventing heart failure is to first accurately identify individuals at high-risk.

Traditional risk factors such as high blood pressure still remain important clinical guides but we are now seeing more cases of heart failure develop in individuals who do not have any specific high risk diseases. Therefore, this research will try to determine more accurate methods of detecting heart failure risk using biomarkers leveraging the latest technology.

This project will evaluate data from 30,000 patients from 10 countries. Emory investigators will work with the National Institutes of Aging-funded Health Aging and Body Composition Study, to assess the value of this approach among 3,000 elderly individuals in the U.S.

HOMAGE will also lead a clinical trial to look for novel treatments of heart failure that can be targeted specifically to those patients at risk.

This research has the potential to benefit thousands of individuals in the U.S. and researchers at Emory are very excited to work with colleagues across Europe in this trans-Atlantic collaboration.

About Dr. Javed Butler
Professor of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine
Director of Heart Failure Research at Emory

After completing medical school from Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan, Dr. Butler did his residency and chief residency at Yale University, Masters in Public Health from Harvard University, and cardiology fellowship including transplant training at Vanderbilt University. Before moving to Emory University, he was the director for the Heart and Heart-Lung Transplant programs at Vanderbilt University. He also has done special cardiac imaging training at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He is on the Editorial Board for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Journal of Cardiac Failure, American Heart Journal and Congestive Heart Failure. He served on the American College of Cardiology Committee on Heart Failure and Transplantation. He is board certified in Cardiology, Internal Medicine, and Nuclear Cardiology. Currently he serves as the Deputy Chief Science Advisor for the American Heart Association. While also heavily involved in research and clinical care at Emory. Dr. Butler’s research focuses primarily on the disease progression, outcomes, and prognosis determination in patients with heart failure, with special emphasis on patients undergoing cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist device placement. He has published many original research articles in multiple peer reviewed journals. He serves on the national board, events committee, and steering committees of several multicenter clinical trials. Dr. Butler is involved in the evaluation and management of all aspects of patients with heart failure including cardiac transplantation and left ventricular assist devices. He is also involved in the cardiac CT program at Emory University.

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Heart Disease is the Number One Killer of Women – Take Action Now to Avoid Being a Statistic!

Many people consider heart disease to be a predominantly male-oriented condition. However, heart disease is the number one killer in women and affects one out of every three in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart.  When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

“The scary thing is that heart attacks in females are more likely to be fatal than in men,” explains Farheen Shirazi, Cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Johns Creek. “Far too often, women ignore the warning signs of a heart attack and do not seek immediate medical attention. As time elapses, the muscles of the heart weaken, causing severe or life-threatening damage.”

Thankfully the awareness about heart disease continues to be on the rise. “The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.”

How can you educate yourself? Join Dr. Shirazi on Tuesday, April 9 for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions such as: what women can do to prevent heart disease, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women.


 About Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Farheen Shirazi, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center.  She specializes in preventive cardiology and heart disease in women.  Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine, her Internship at New York University School of Medicine, her residency at Stanford Hospital and her Fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Shirazi has been practicing at Emory since 2012 and primarily sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Cumming She is passionate about educating women about how to prevent heart disease.

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Two Emory Physicians Honored with National Red Dress Award!

Dr. Leslee ShawDr. Sanjay GuptaWoman’s Day magazine is honoring Leslee Shaw, PhD, and Sanjay Gupta, MD, with two of its four Red Dress Awards for 2013. The award honors those who have made significant contributions in the fight against heart disease among women.

Dr. Shaw and Dr. Gupta join the ranks of other distinguished Red Dress award recipients including United States Surgeon General Regina M. Benjamin, renowned journalist Barbara Walters and Elizabeth Nabel, MD, former head of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Dr. Shaw is a professor of medicine at Emory School of Medicine and co-directs the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute. She currently serves on the Cardiovascular Imaging Committee for the American Heart Association and is on the Board of Directors for the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. She is a past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology.

Dr. Shaw Red Dress AwardHer areas of interest and expertise include test accuracy, risk assessment, prognosis and cost efficiency—with a particular emphasis on the role of how diagnostic tests work differently to assess heart disease risk in various ethnic groups and in women versus men.

Dr. Gupta is CNN’s chief medical correspondent and is an assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory School of Medicine and associate chief of neurosurgery at Grady Memorial Hospital. He is a practicing neurosurgeon at Emory University and Grady hospitals.

Gupta’s medical training and public health policy experience distinguish his reporting on a range of medical and scientific topics including brain injury, disaster recovery, health care reform, fitness, military medicine, HIV/AIDS and other areas.

The prestigious award will be presented on February 12 at Lincoln Center in New York City. To learn more about this award visit Red Dress Awards 2013 – Woman’s Day.

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Attend a HeartWise Heart Disease Prevention Event in December!

December Heart Healthy EventsEmory Healthcare’s HeartWise℠ Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce the Atlanta community’s risk for heart disease through educational and interactive events. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

You can register for any of our December HeartWise events online!

♥ New Year Goal Setting
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, December 10, 12pm – 12:30pm and
Thursday, December 13, 8:30am – 9:00am

♥ WomenHeart of Atlanta: Support Group
Monday, December 17, 12pm – 1pm

♥ Losing Weight by Eating Right
Dr. Michael Cantor
Wednesday, December 19, 11:30am – 12pm

♥ Do you Know Your Medications?
Thursday, December 27, 8:30am – 9:00am and 12pm – 12:30pm

Admission is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can register for a HeartWise event online!

*If you would like to purchase a t-shirt or calendar where the proceeds go to the HeartWise scholarship fund which allows patients who run into financial challenges continue the wellness and prevention please call 404-778-2850
emoryhealthcare.org/heart

Join us for a HeartWise Heart Disease Prevention Event in October!

October Heart Disease Prevention Events

The HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

Admission is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for a HeartWise lecture online.

Fats:  The Good, the Bad, the Ugly
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Thursday, October  4, 2012
8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

Chocolate 4 the Heart
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Monday, October 15th 2012
12:00 PM – 12:30 PM

Healthy Eating Made Easy
Cheryl Williams, RD/LD
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
8:30 AM – 9:00 AM

WomenHeart of Atlanta Support Group
Monday, October 29, 2012
12:00 PM – 12:45 PM

Osteoarthritis of the Hip & Knee: Prevention & Exercise
Dr. Jacob Lee MD
Friday, October 26th
11:45 AM -12:15 PM

Admission to HeartWise events is free and everyone is welcome! Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for one of our October HeartWise lectures online!

Honoring Emory Cardiologist, Nanette K. Wenger, MD

Emory cardiologist, Nanette K. Wenger, MD, was awarded the highest honor for contributions in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

Nanette K. Wenger, MD, MACC, MACP, FAHA

We are proud to recognize, Emory cardiologist and professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, Nanette K. Wenger, M.D., who was named a Master of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (MAACVPR). She received this outstanding honor in recognition of her continued outstanding contributions to the field of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and to the care of persons with cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. The AACVPR is an organization that promotes health and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

“It was exciting to have been involved in the development of and advocacy for cardiac rehabilitation several decades ago, when many considered it an experimental intervention,” says Dr. Wenger. “The enormous satisfaction today is that it is an accepted component of the continuum of cardiac care, with cardiac rehabilitation being a Class IA recommendation in all contemporary cardiovascular clinical practice guidelines.”

Dr. Wenger is internationally renowned for her research and clinical work on coronary heart disease in women. She has been a trailblazer and icon in the field of cardiology as author and co–author of more than 1,300 scientific and review articles and book chapters.

For more information, read the news story on Nanette, K. Wenger, M.D. and this prestigious honor.

Atlanta Man Narrowly Avoids Heart Attack – Do You Know When to Go?

Know When to Go to the E.R.Saint Joseph’s Hospital patient and triathlete, Joe Michalak, narrowly missed a heart attack by listening to the risk factors of heart disease. On Father’s Day weekend, he felt some tweaks in his chest and instead of ignorning his symptoms, he went to the hospital right away. Luckily, Joe listened to his body. In hindsight, he had a 95 percentage blockage in his left anterior artery and 80 percent blockage in another one.

Learn more about Joe’s symptoms and what prompted him to make a trip to his local E.R. at Saint Joseph’s Hospital.

What Kind of Shape Your Heart Is In?

Do you know what kind of shape your heart is in? Knowing the risk factors for heart disease and your level of risk can help you  act to reduce your heart disease risk level by as much as 80%.

Watch this Fox 5 Interview with Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist, Dr. Laurence Sperling as he gives you tips on how to make sure you keep your heart in top shape.