Posts Tagged ‘Heart Disease’

Reversing Heart Disease – Is it Possible?

Did you know that in women, heart disease takes more lives than every type of cancer combined? The good news is that in the last 20 years deaths due to heart disease have declined thanks to advances in medicine as well as education of the population.

In the past, heart disease was thought to be just a “man’s disease,” but surprisingly more women currently die from cardiovascular disease than men. Therefore, it is important to take action to prevent and potentially reverse heart disease. If you think you may be at risk, schedule your heart disease screening today.

There are various things you can do to reverse heart disease and if action is taken quickly, heart disease symptoms can be reduced in a very short period of time.

  • Evaluate your diet to determine if the foods you are eating are causing plaque build up. If you stop consuming foods that are contributing the plaque build up, your arteries will have a better chance to recover. A plant based diet incorporating fruits, vegetables and whole grains can likely help to reverse heart disease.
    • If this diet is too restrictive, or you are just looking to prevent heart disease, the USDA ‘s new “MyPlate” program is a good option. It suggests filling half of your plate with fruits and vegetables, and the other half is split between lean proteins and good carbs, like brown rice or quinoa. In addition, the program says to:
      • Reduce saturated fat to less than 7% of your daily total calories
      • Choose healthier fats, like from salmon, omega-3 fatty acids, nuts, avocados and olives
    • This will ensure that you feel better, no matter how old or how sick you may have felt before, in a more sustainable way.
  • Exercise – If you really want to reverse heart disease, you have to start working exercise into your daily routine. If you have never exercised, you can start with as little as 15 minutes a day and work your way up to 30 minutes a day. If you don’t have time to hit the gym each day, work 30 minutes into your daily routine. Walk your child to school, take the stairs at work, go for a 15-minute walk at lunch, or mow your lawn. These are all ways to get your heart rate up during your daily activities.
  • Relax – take time each day to totally unwind and de-stress. Turn off the computer, turn off the TV, put the kids to bed and totally relax. Stress is a big contributor to heart disease, the quicker you learn to manage your stress the quicker you will be able to reverse some of the symptoms of heart disease.

Heart Disease Screening

About Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Resources:

How the “Superwoman” Syndrome Impacts Heart Health

superwoman4Are you a woman who tries to do it all? Many women are busier than ever these days juggling their careers, families, children, household duties, social lives and other obligations. When we can’t do it all, many of us feel guilty that we are unable to achieve perfection and balance in our lives. At the times we are most stressed, many of us make unhealthy choices, such as leaving exercise out of our daily routine, eating unhealthy foods and not getting enough rest. Unfortunately, this “superwoman” syndrome can lead to higher blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, higher cholesterol, cancer and importantly, heart disease, which is the number one killer of women in this country.

Heart disease may be prevented and is potentially reversible in many cases, so it’s important to learn how to make the best choices for our future health.

1. Realize that it is ok to not be perfect all the time. You are not alone — ask any other woman, and most likely you will learn that she is experiencing some of the same struggles as you. When you can’t be perfect, learn to laugh through the chaos.

2. Learn stress-relieving techniques. Determine the avenue for stress relief that works best for you. For some people it is going out for a run or scheduling a girls’ night, while others may prefer some time alone. Determine which activities make you happiest and make sure to work some of these into your schedule.

3. Eat healthy foods. Food choices can dramatically impact the way you feel. Make sure to balance protein, carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, and good fats in each meal so that your body has the energy it needs to make it through the toughest days.

4. Rest. Make sure to get six to eight hours of rest each night. Although it may be hard to pack this much rest into the day with your hectic schedule, try to rest as much as possible so you are alert and more productive. When you are rested, you can accomplish more, and you feel better overall.

5. Exercise. Try to work exercise into your daily routine. Exercise has been proven to increase energy levels, lower stress and improve mood. If you don’t have time to go out for a morning run, walk up stairs, park at the back of the parking lot, do squats at your desk while on a teleconference or lift hand weights while you are waiting for your child to get ready for school.

All of the recommendations above do not have to be completed at once — at first, try taking small steps toward improving your health. If you have a high-stress lifestyle and think you may be at risk for heart disease, schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening at the Emory Women’s Heart Center. Emory Women’s Heart Center nurse practitioners may be able to help you craft a plan to help you reduce stress and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

screening-bar

Farheen Shirazi, MDAbout Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Links

Quiz: Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?

Stress & Heart Disease Chat With Dr. Parashar

Keep Your Heart Healthy – Get Active!

Signs That You May Need a Cardiovascular Screening

Make a Healthy Nutrition New Year’s Resolution You Will Keep All Year Long!

Understanding the Different Types of Heart Disease

Heart Disease TypesDid you know there are more than 50 types of heart disease? “Heart disease” is actually a general term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart. Heart disease generally describes a heart’s capacity for pumping blood and oxygen throughout the body. Other heart conditions, such as infections and conditions that affect your heart’s muscle, valves or beating rhythm, also are considered forms of heart disease.

Some of the most common types of heart disease are:

Heart Disease Risk QuizAlthough some of the types of heart disease listed above are not preventable, Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians work with subspecialty physicians from across the Emory Healthcare system to ensure that the treatment you receive for your heart disease is high quality. In many of the areas listed above such as congenital heart disease and heart valve disease, Emory physicians and researchers have been instrumental in bringing the newest treatments and procedures to the bedside.

The good news is that many types of heart disease can be prevented with healthy habits. You can reduce your risk of certain types of heart disease, such as heart attack, coronary artery disease and peripheral artery disease by doing the following:

  • Eating a low sodium diet
  • Eating more fresh fruit and vegetables while limiting processed foods and those high in saturated fat
  • Exercising at least 3 – 5 times a week for 30 minutes a day
  • Stop smoking!
  • Controling your diabetes and high blood pressure

Take control of your heart health by educating yourself on the types of heart disease, risk factors and symptoms. This is very important to ensure that if you or a loved one does develop heart disease you can take quick action and potentially save a life.

Related Resources

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Susmita Parashar, MD, MPH, MS, FACC
Dr. Susmita ParasharSusmita Parashar, MD, MPH, MS is a Board certified cardiologist at the Emory Heart and Vascular Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine. Prior to joining as faculty in the Division of Cardiology, Dr Parashar was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Medicine at Emory for 8 years. She applies her experience as a Board certified internist in providing a holistic care to patients. She was awarded the American Heart Association (AHA) Trudy Bush Fellowship for Cardiovascular Research in Women’s Health Award to recognize outstanding work in the area of women’s health and cardiovascular disease and Emory Department of Medicine Early Career Faculty Research Award for Clinical Research.

Dr. Parashar completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Medical College of Georgia, Augusta and Cardiology fellowship at Emory University. She completed her Master of Public Health and a Master of Science from Emory in 2005. A passionate clinician-researcher and educator, she trains medical students, residents and cardiology fellows. In addition, she conducts clinical research. Dr Parashar’s clinical and research focus is in preventive cardiology with a focus on women and cardiovascular diseases.

She has received several grants and awards from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the AHA to conduct research on women and heart disease. She has served as Emory principal investigator for large NIH funded clinical research for heart attack patients. She was also invited to participate as a co-investigator for the NIH funded Cardiovascular Health Study for older adults. She has presented her work in national and international scientific meetings, including the AHA Annual Session, AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke, American College of Cardiology Annual Session, Society of General Internal Medicine and International Congress of Coronary Heart Disease.

Dr. Parashar has authored/coauthored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, including invited textbook chapters, manuscripts, abstracts and review articles. Her work has been published in such prestigious journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine and Circulation, and highlighted by the Nature and national media such as CNN, CBS and NPR news. She believes in family-career balance and applies her experience as a mother of two young children and wife to her work.

Takeaways from Dr. Murphy and Dr. Halkos’ Chat on Mitral Valve Disease

Mitral Valve Disease Q&AThank you for attending the live chat on mitral valve disease on Tuesday, February 25. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here).

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Jean -What precautions need to be taken when diagnosed?

halkos-michael

Dr. Halkos: 

Jean – In general, patients with mitral valve disorders need to take special precautions against infection during certain procedures, such as dental cleaning.  It is important to let providers that take care of you know you have mitral valve disorders when seeing them so they can take the necessary precautions.

Emory Cardiologist Elected President of American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Emory Heart & Vascular CenterEmory Heart & Vascular cardiologist, Laurence S. Sperling, MD, was recently named the president-elect of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology (ASPC). Dr. Sperling’s two-year-term will begin in 2014.

The ASPC was founded in 1975 and represents the increasingly multidisciplinary group of healthcare providers (including nurses, nurse practitioners, dieticians and other healthcare specialists in addition to physicians) along with researchers and industry representatives who share an interest in and passion for preventive cardiology.

Dr. Sperling is the medical director of the Emory’s Heart Disease Prevention Center and also serves as medical director for a number of unique programs at Emory including the HeartWise Risk Reduction Program and Optimal Living. In 2004, Dr. Sperling founded and currently directs the first and only LDL apheresis program in the state of Georgia. He has also been instrumental in the development of the Emory Women’s Heart Center which will be opening up two new locations, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Johns Creek Hospital, in September 2014.

Sperling has been an investigator in a number of important clinical trials and has authored more than 150 manuscripts, abstracts and book chapters. He is co-editor of the American College of Cardiology’s Diabetes Self Assessment Program and has served as special consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 2011, Sperling has served annually on the U.S. News & World Report’s panel of 22 national dietary experts evaluating the country’s most popular diets for the publication’s “Best Diets” rankings.

Congratulations Dr. Sperling! We are happy to have you on the Emory team.

About Dr. Laurence Sperling

Dr. Laurence Sperling

Dr. Sperling specializes in internal medicine and cardiology—his areas of clinical interest are cardiac catheterization, cardiac rehabilitation, general cardiology, echocardiogram, lipid metabolism, and electron beam computed tomography. Dr. Sperling has received various awards from the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association Council, and Emory University Hospital and has been a special consultant to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Sperling received his undergraduate degree from Emory College and graduated with his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine in 1989. He subsequently completed eight additional years of training at Emory, including a residency in internal medicine, chief resident year at Emory University Hospital, a National Institutes of Health-supported research fellowship in molecular and vascular medicine and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases.

Related Resources:

Shape Up Your Heart this Summer by Attending a Heart Disease Prevention Event!

HeartWise events AtlantaThe HeartWise℠ Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

You can register for our HeartWise events online!

♥ WomenHeart of Atlanta: Support Group
Monday, July 8, 12pm – 1:15pm

♥ Food Safety
Tasha Mickens, RD, LD, CDE
Monday, July 22, 12pm – 12:30pm

♥ Heart Healthy Fats
Tasha Mickens, RD, LD, CDE
Monday, July 29, 12:00pm – 12:30pm

♥ Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease
Courtney Sutton, Masters of Clinical Exercise Physiology Intern
Wednesday, July 31, 8:30am – 9:00am AND 11:30am – Noon

♥ Connections Between Aging, Balance & Exercise
Joshua Naterman, Georgia State University Exercise Science Intern
Monday, August 5, 8:30am – 9:00am AND Noon – 12:30pm

♥ Fantastic Fiber
Tasha Mickens, RD, LD, CDE
Monday, August 19, 12pm – 12:30pm

♥ WomenHeart of Atlanta: Support Group
Monday, July 8, 12pm – 1:15pm

Admission for our heart disease prevention events is free and everyone is welcome.  Parking is validated for up to 2 hours. Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can register for our HeartWise events online!

*If you would like to purchase a t-shirt or calendar where the proceeds go to the HeartWise scholarship fund which allows patients who run into financial challenges continue the wellness and prevention, please call 404-778-2850.

Related Resources: