Posts Tagged ‘Heart Disease’

Do All Heart Attacks Present With Chest Pain?

women heart painChest pain is the most common symptom of a heart attack in both men and women. However, it is important to understand that the exact nature of chest pain can be quite different in women and is often not the most prominent symptom of a heart attack.

Most of us probably think of a heart attack the way it is portrayed on television and in the movies: A sudden, dramatic occurrence that causes the victim to clutch his or her chest in agony. Women, however, may report chest pressure, discomfort, fullness or a burning sensation. In addition, they often experience pain in adjacent areas, such as the upper abdomen, upper back, neck, arms and jaw.

As a result of this variation of presenting symptoms, women who have complaints other than chest pain during a heart attack may be overlooked or not evaluated in a timely fashion. Women are more likely than men to have already sustained heart damage by the time they reach the emergency room. A heart attack can begin to cause damage within minutes of the start of symptoms, and sometimes this damage is irreversible. This is why it is critical that women and their loved ones learn to recognize the typical and atypical symptoms of a heart attack and seek emergency care immediately.

Screening is one way for women to determine their risk for heart disease. Through screening efforts, individuals can identify ways to reduce their risk of a heart attack and find out if they need to see a cardiologist for additional evaluation and testing. The Emory Women’s Heart Center offers comprehensive cardiac risk assessments for women who may be at risk for heart disease or want to learn more about what they can do to reduce this risk. As part of these comprehensive screenings, we review strategies to improve overall cardiovascular health and offer treatment options if appropriate.  Schedule your screening today!

Heart Disease Screening

About Dr. Isiadinso

Ijeoma Isiadinso, MDIjeoma Isiadinso, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York, majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as chief fellow during the final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.

Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools and universities and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

Dr. Isiadinso is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular diseases, nuclear cardiology, echocardiography and cardiovascular computed tomography. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Black Cardiologists, the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Preventive Cardiology and the American Public Health Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiac screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

Related Links

How Does Heart Disease Present Differently in Women?

Women's Heart DiseaseHeart disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States, but it can manifest differently in women. In addition, certain types of heart disease affect women more often than men.

The most common type of heart disease is coronary artery disease (CAD). This occurs as a result of plaque buildup in the arteries (atherosclerosis) causing a decrease in blood flow to the heart muscle. It is well known that women may experience different symptoms of CAD than men. One of the most common symptoms is chest pain, also known as angina, which occurs when the heart does not receive enough oxygen-rich blood. In men, angina tends to manifest as a pressure or squeezing sensation in the chest. Although women also have chest pain, they are more likely to have atypical symptoms such as indigestion, shortness of breath or pain in the neck, jaw, stomach or back.

Coronary microvascular disease (MVD) is similar to CAD in that it affects the blood supply to the heart muscle. Instead of the major coronary arteries being blocked by significant plaque, in MVD there is spasm of the smaller arteries of the heart. This disorder affects women in greater numbers than men. Risk factors for coronary MVD are similar to those for CAD, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and high cholesterol. As with CAD, angina is the most common symptom. However, in MVD, the angina tends to occur during normal daily activities and at times of mental stress.

Broken heart syndrome is another type of heart disease that is more common in women. Broken heart syndrome is also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy or takotsubo cardiomyopathy and is characterized by chest pain and shortness of breath. Although, the symptoms are similar to a heart attack, stress-induced cardiomyopathy is not associated with significantly blocked coronary arteries. As the name implies, this syndrome develops as a result of extreme emotional or physical stress. Most individuals completely recover within a short amount of time with appropriate treatment.

Because heart disease often affects women differently than men, Emory created the Women’s Heart Center, a unique program dedicated to diagnosis, screening, treatment and prevention of heart disease in women. The Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians understand these differences and have specialized education and expertise in this area.

About Dr. Isiadinso

Ijeoma Isiadinso, MDIjeoma Isiadinso, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York, majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as chief fellow during the final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.

Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools and universities and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

Dr. Isiadinso is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular diseases, nuclear cardiology, echocardiography and cardiovascular computed tomography. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Black Cardiologists, the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Preventive Cardiology and the American Public Health Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiac screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

Related Links

Did you Know that Stroke is the Third Leading Cause of Death in Women? Learn how to Protect Yourself!

StrokeRisk factors for heart disease and stroke can be different for women versus men so it is exciting to note that earlier this year, the American Heart Association in conjunction with the American Stroke Association released new stroke prevention guidelines specifically for women!

The guidelines, based on scientific findings, offer tips on how to reduce risk factors for stroke as well as treatment protocol if a stroke does occur. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association outlines the following:

  • Women who have had high blood pressure before pregnancy she be closely monitored by a physician to evaluate the need for adding medications to try to lower the risk for preeclampsia.
  • The following are risk factors that increase the risk for stroke:
    • Obesity
    • Smoking
    • High cholesterol

A patient should work with her physician to determine the best way to reduce these risk factors with lifestyle modifications such as diet and exercise.

  • Women who had preeclampsia, a condition some women develop during pregnancy that is typically characterized by high blood pressure, swelling and fluid retention, have a higher probability of stroke during or after pregnancy. Therefore, women who have had preeclampsia should develop a prevention plan in conjunction with their physician in order to mitigate the risk from this condition.
  • Women who are pregnant with moderate to severe high blood pressure should work with their physician to determine if they should be actively treated for the condition.
  • Birth control pills in combination with high blood pressure can increase the risk of stroke in female patients. Therefore, before a woman is prescribed birth control pills, she should be screened for high blood pressure.
  • If you suffer from migraine headaches, stop smoking! Scientific research shows that women with migraine headaches who smoke are at higher risk for a stroke.
  • Get screened for atrial fibrillation if you are a woman over 75 years old.

The Emory Women’s Heart Center offers screenings for women who could be at risk for heart disease. Take the short online quiz to see if you are at risk.

If you have one or more risk factors, we encourage you to schedule a comprehensive heart screening. During the screening you will develop an individualized risk reduction action plan to help prevent heart disease and stroke. Heart disease and stroke are preventable if you take action to develop a healthy lifestyle!

Heart Disease Screening

Also, to get more information on how to reduce your risk, we invite you to attend a Stroke Awareness Event at Emory Healthcare during May!

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

About Gina Lundberg

Gina Lundberg, MDGina Price Lundberg, MD, FACC, Emory Women’s Heart Center Clinical Director, is a Preventive Cardiologist with Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. She is a National American Heart Association (AHA) spokesperson and has been a Board Member for Atlanta chapter from 2001 till 2007. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for American Heart Association’s North Fulton/ Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009 she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is also a Circle of Red founding member and Cor Vitae member for AHA.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women in various media channels including CNN and in USA Today. Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the Advisory Board for the Department of Women’s Health for the State of Georgia in 2007 till 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman Magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008 Atlanta Woman Magazine named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine.

Related Links

Emory Women’s Heart Center
Quiz – Are you at Risk for Heart Disease
Become aware of the risks, signs and symptoms of stroke
Attend a Stroke Awareness Event at Emory Healthcare
Schedule Your arrhythmia Screenings

What Can You Do to Fight High Blood Pressure?

hypertensionDid you know that over 30% of adults (over the age of 20) have high blood pressure, also known as hypertension?* Did you also know that high blood pressure is a leading cause of heart disease, stroke and kidney disease? The good news is that high blood pressure can be prevented if you educate yourself and take the recommended course of action from your physician.

What is High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)?
Blood pressure is the amount of the blood force against the arterial walls. The upper number is the pressure when the heart is contracting and the lower number is when the heart is at rest.

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is when one or both numbers are elevated. Normally it should be under 140/90 mmHg, and anything above this is considered elevated.

What are the symptoms of High Blood Pressure?
Many people think that you can tell if you have high blood pressure by experiencing symptoms like headache, nose bleeds or chest pains, but the reality is that hypertension is a symptomless disease. When blood pressure is elevated and is not treated, you heart, brain and kidneys can suffer the consequences and you do not know it.

Get checked for High Blood Pressure
Everyone should know what their blood pressure numbers are and get treated if elevated or prevent it from being elevated. Factors like age, obesity, family history, increased salt consumption, medications, lack of exercise, alcohol, drugs, renal disease and hormonal abnormalities can contribute to the development of high blood pressure.

What can I do to prevent high blood pressure?

  1. Reduce salt (sodium) intake – Salt is known to retain water and increase blood pressure and the United States is considered a society that consumes a high salt diet. Most of the salt we eat comes from processed and packed foods. The recommendation is to consume less than 1,500 mg of sodium a day, to get an idea a teaspoon of salt has 2,400 mg of sodium!
  2. Consume Potassium – Potassium counterbalances the effects of sodium, at least 4,700 mg daily is advised. Some of the foods rich in potassium are potatoes, greens, bananas, tomatoes and oranges. Patients with renal disease should discuss with their doctors about their potassium intake.
  3. Limit alcohol consumption – Men should limit their alcohol intake to 2 drinks per day and women to 1 drink daily.
  4. Exercise! Exercise! Do at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic physical activity to keep your circulation, lungs and heart healthy.

If despite of trying your best to prevent hypertension your blood pressure is elevated, your doctor can work with you to find an appropriate medical regimen to control it. Medications that help your body eliminating the sodium excess, retaining potassium or relaxing your blood vessels can be prescribed to you. Together with diet and exercise, medications can control hypertension and prevent heart attacks and strokes.

To learn more about ways to prevent and treat hypertension, join us at the Community Education Series sponsored by the Emory-Adventist Hospital at Smyrna, 3949 South Cobb Drive Smyrna, GA 30080. The event will take place  on Wednesday June 18th, 2014 at 7:00 pm. To find out more, visit https://www.emoryadventist.org/education-events.

*Centers for Disease Control

About Dr. Gongora

Carolina Gongora, MDDr. Gongora is a Board certified cardiologist at the Emory Heart and Vascular Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Gongora currently sees clinical patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Smyrna. To schedule a general preventive cardiology consult please call 404-778-7777.
Dr Gongora went to medical school in Bogotá, Colombia, where she is from originally. She moved to Atlanta in 2005. Before starting her training in Internal Medicine and Cardiology at Emory University, Dr Gongora did a post doctoral research fellowship in hypertension and renal disease. Her research was partially funded by the American Heart Association.

During this time she published in recognized journals like the Journal of American College of Cardiology, Hypertension and Circulation. Also, she presented in nationally renowned meetings, like the American Heart Association, the American Society of Hypertension and the American Physiology Society meetings, among others. She has been a member of the American College of Cardiology, the American Physiological Society and the American Heart Association-Council for high blood pressure.

She is board certified in Cardiology, Internal Medicine and Echocardiography.

Related Links

Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Smyrna
Emory Women’s Heart Center
Manage Your Blood Pressure & Keep Your Heart Healthy
Emory Explores New Treatment Option to Reduce High Blood Pressure

Did you know that you can exercise at work even if you have a desk job?

Exercise at WorkThe Emory Center for Heart Disease Prevention staff are practicing what they preach and are doing their best to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity most days of the week. They recently acquired 2 bike pedal systems that fit under the desk so staff can exercise while working. These unique devices are small and easy to use and can be used for short periods of time to get your heart pumping. After using the bike pedals, Emory registered nurse Charlotte Applequist, RN commented, “I was surprised that I burned a total of 142 calories pedaling on and off through out the day! A lot of days I don’t get to workout at home, so this was great! My mood is better at work as well; my stress level was reduced.”

Emory Senior Medical Secretary Patty Watson also commented, “I sit a lot at work and my commute is two hours round trip to Emory. Already, I can feel the benefit of stronger legs and mentally I feel more invigorated.”

Exercise is one part of the equation in the fight against heart disease but Emory Women’s Heart Center Nurse Practitioner Chris Nell-Dybdahl also recommends that in order to improve cardiovascular health you must eat a heart healthy Mediterranean – style diet, reduce stress and follow a prevention plan.

Heart Disease Screening

To find out if you are at risk for heart disease, schedule your heart screening today by calling 404-778-7777 or visit emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart

If you work on or near the Emory campus, drop by the Emory Heart Disease Prevention Center at The Emory Clinic, Second Floor Cardiology and see what the fuss is all about as well as inquire about purchasing these for your office!

About Christine Nell-Dybdahl, NP-C, MPH, MSN

Christine Nell – Dybdahl, NP – C, MPH, MSN has been a registered nurse since 1994 and a nurse practitioner since 1998. She brings to the practice over 20 years of cardiology experience. She is the clinical nurse director for Emory’s Center for Heart Disease Prevention and is active with the Emory’s Women’s Heart Program. She received her BSN from Kent State University and her dual master degrees from Emory University in nursing (board certified family nurse practitioner) and public health (health education and promotion). Her interests include cardiovascular disease prevention, heart healthy life style changes, cholesterol abnormalities, women’s heart care, and family-involved chronic heart disease management. Chris is a member of the American College of Cardiology, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She makes it a priority to connect interested patients and researchers at Emory. She is the founder and clinical leader of the Women Living with Angina Support Group. She has co-authored several journal articles and has spoken at many conferences on a wide variety of topics

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

About the Emory Heart Disease Prevention Center

Emory Heart Disease Prevention specialists provide a collaborative and comprehensive approach to the prevention, detection and reversal of heart disease. We offer a full range of prevention and wellness programs that will help you stay healthy. You can count on our commitment to guiding you to a healthier way of life for yourself and those you love.

Reversing Heart Disease – Is it Possible?

Did you know that in women, heart disease takes more lives than every type of cancer combined? The good news is that in the last 20 years deaths due to heart disease have declined thanks to advances in medicine as well as education of the population.

In the past, heart disease was thought to be just a “man’s disease,” but surprisingly more women currently die from cardiovascular disease than men. Therefore, it is important to take action to prevent and potentially reverse heart disease. If you think you may be at risk, schedule your heart disease screening today.

There are various things you can do to reverse heart disease and if action is taken quickly, heart disease symptoms can be reduced in a very short period of time.

  • Evaluate your diet to determine if the foods you are eating are causing plaque build up. If you stop consuming foods that are contributing the plaque build up, your arteries will have a better chance to recover. A plant based diet incorporating fruits, vegetables and whole grains can likely help to reverse heart disease.
    • If this diet is too restrictive, or you are just looking to prevent heart disease, the USDA ‘s new “MyPlate” program is a good option. It suggests filling half of your plate with fruits and vegetables, and the other half is split between lean proteins and good carbs, like brown rice or quinoa. In addition, the program says to:
      • Reduce saturated fat to less than 7% of your daily total calories
      • Choose healthier fats, like from salmon, omega-3 fatty acids, nuts, avocados and olives
    • This will ensure that you feel better, no matter how old or how sick you may have felt before, in a more sustainable way.
  • Exercise – If you really want to reverse heart disease, you have to start working exercise into your daily routine. If you have never exercised, you can start with as little as 15 minutes a day and work your way up to 30 minutes a day. If you don’t have time to hit the gym each day, work 30 minutes into your daily routine. Walk your child to school, take the stairs at work, go for a 15-minute walk at lunch, or mow your lawn. These are all ways to get your heart rate up during your daily activities.
  • Relax – take time each day to totally unwind and de-stress. Turn off the computer, turn off the TV, put the kids to bed and totally relax. Stress is a big contributor to heart disease, the quicker you learn to manage your stress the quicker you will be able to reverse some of the symptoms of heart disease.

Heart Disease Screening

About Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Resources:

How the “Superwoman” Syndrome Impacts Heart Health

superwoman4Are you a woman who tries to do it all? Many women are busier than ever these days juggling their careers, families, children, household duties, social lives and other obligations. When we can’t do it all, many of us feel guilty that we are unable to achieve perfection and balance in our lives. At the times we are most stressed, many of us make unhealthy choices, such as leaving exercise out of our daily routine, eating unhealthy foods and not getting enough rest. Unfortunately, this “superwoman” syndrome can lead to higher blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, higher cholesterol, cancer and importantly, heart disease, which is the number one killer of women in this country.

Heart disease may be prevented and is potentially reversible in many cases, so it’s important to learn how to make the best choices for our future health.

1. Realize that it is ok to not be perfect all the time. You are not alone — ask any other woman, and most likely you will learn that she is experiencing some of the same struggles as you. When you can’t be perfect, learn to laugh through the chaos.

2. Learn stress-relieving techniques. Determine the avenue for stress relief that works best for you. For some people it is going out for a run or scheduling a girls’ night, while others may prefer some time alone. Determine which activities make you happiest and make sure to work some of these into your schedule.

3. Eat healthy foods. Food choices can dramatically impact the way you feel. Make sure to balance protein, carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, and good fats in each meal so that your body has the energy it needs to make it through the toughest days.

4. Rest. Make sure to get six to eight hours of rest each night. Although it may be hard to pack this much rest into the day with your hectic schedule, try to rest as much as possible so you are alert and more productive. When you are rested, you can accomplish more, and you feel better overall.

5. Exercise. Try to work exercise into your daily routine. Exercise has been proven to increase energy levels, lower stress and improve mood. If you don’t have time to go out for a morning run, walk up stairs, park at the back of the parking lot, do squats at your desk while on a teleconference or lift hand weights while you are waiting for your child to get ready for school.

All of the recommendations above do not have to be completed at once — at first, try taking small steps toward improving your health. If you have a high-stress lifestyle and think you may be at risk for heart disease, schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening at the Emory Women’s Heart Center. Emory Women’s Heart Center nurse practitioners may be able to help you craft a plan to help you reduce stress and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

screening-bar

Farheen Shirazi, MDAbout Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Links

Quiz: Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?

Stress & Heart Disease Chat With Dr. Parashar

Keep Your Heart Healthy – Get Active!

Signs That You May Need a Cardiovascular Screening

Make a Healthy Nutrition New Year’s Resolution You Will Keep All Year Long!

Understanding the Different Types of Heart Disease

Heart Disease TypesDid you know there are more than 50 types of heart disease? “Heart disease” is actually a general term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart. Heart disease generally describes a heart’s capacity for pumping blood and oxygen throughout the body. Other heart conditions, such as infections and conditions that affect your heart’s muscle, valves or beating rhythm, also are considered forms of heart disease.

Some of the most common types of heart disease are:

Heart Disease Risk QuizAlthough some of the types of heart disease listed above are not preventable, Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians work with subspecialty physicians from across the Emory Healthcare system to ensure that the treatment you receive for your heart disease is high quality. In many of the areas listed above such as congenital heart disease and heart valve disease, Emory physicians and researchers have been instrumental in bringing the newest treatments and procedures to the bedside.

The good news is that many types of heart disease can be prevented with healthy habits. You can reduce your risk of certain types of heart disease, such as heart attack, coronary artery disease and peripheral artery disease by doing the following:

  • Eating a low sodium diet
  • Eating more fresh fruit and vegetables while limiting processed foods and those high in saturated fat
  • Exercising at least 3 – 5 times a week for 30 minutes a day
  • Stop smoking!
  • Controling your diabetes and high blood pressure

Take control of your heart health by educating yourself on the types of heart disease, risk factors and symptoms. This is very important to ensure that if you or a loved one does develop heart disease you can take quick action and potentially save a life.

Related Resources

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Susmita Parashar, MD, MPH, MS, FACC
Dr. Susmita ParasharSusmita Parashar, MD, MPH, MS is a Board certified cardiologist at the Emory Heart and Vascular Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine. Prior to joining as faculty in the Division of Cardiology, Dr Parashar was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Medicine at Emory for 8 years. She applies her experience as a Board certified internist in providing a holistic care to patients. She was awarded the American Heart Association (AHA) Trudy Bush Fellowship for Cardiovascular Research in Women’s Health Award to recognize outstanding work in the area of women’s health and cardiovascular disease and Emory Department of Medicine Early Career Faculty Research Award for Clinical Research.

Dr. Parashar completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Medical College of Georgia, Augusta and Cardiology fellowship at Emory University. She completed her Master of Public Health and a Master of Science from Emory in 2005. A passionate clinician-researcher and educator, she trains medical students, residents and cardiology fellows. In addition, she conducts clinical research. Dr Parashar’s clinical and research focus is in preventive cardiology with a focus on women and cardiovascular diseases.

She has received several grants and awards from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the AHA to conduct research on women and heart disease. She has served as Emory principal investigator for large NIH funded clinical research for heart attack patients. She was also invited to participate as a co-investigator for the NIH funded Cardiovascular Health Study for older adults. She has presented her work in national and international scientific meetings, including the AHA Annual Session, AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke, American College of Cardiology Annual Session, Society of General Internal Medicine and International Congress of Coronary Heart Disease.

Dr. Parashar has authored/coauthored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, including invited textbook chapters, manuscripts, abstracts and review articles. Her work has been published in such prestigious journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine and Circulation, and highlighted by the Nature and national media such as CNN, CBS and NPR news. She believes in family-career balance and applies her experience as a mother of two young children and wife to her work.

Takeaways from Dr. Murphy and Dr. Halkos’ Chat on Mitral Valve Disease

Mitral Valve Disease Q&AThank you for attending the live chat on mitral valve disease on Tuesday, February 25. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here).

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Jean -What precautions need to be taken when diagnosed?

halkos-michael

Dr. Halkos: 

Jean – In general, patients with mitral valve disorders need to take special precautions against infection during certain procedures, such as dental cleaning.  It is important to let providers that take care of you know you have mitral valve disorders when seeing them so they can take the necessary precautions.

Emory Cardiologist Elected President of American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Emory Heart & Vascular CenterEmory Heart & Vascular cardiologist, Laurence S. Sperling, MD, was recently named the president-elect of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology (ASPC). Dr. Sperling’s two-year-term will begin in 2014.

The ASPC was founded in 1975 and represents the increasingly multidisciplinary group of healthcare providers (including nurses, nurse practitioners, dieticians and other healthcare specialists in addition to physicians) along with researchers and industry representatives who share an interest in and passion for preventive cardiology.

Dr. Sperling is the medical director of the Emory’s Heart Disease Prevention Center and also serves as medical director for a number of unique programs at Emory including the HeartWise Risk Reduction Program and Optimal Living. In 2004, Dr. Sperling founded and currently directs the first and only LDL apheresis program in the state of Georgia. He has also been instrumental in the development of the Emory Women’s Heart Center which will be opening up two new locations, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Johns Creek Hospital, in September 2014.

Sperling has been an investigator in a number of important clinical trials and has authored more than 150 manuscripts, abstracts and book chapters. He is co-editor of the American College of Cardiology’s Diabetes Self Assessment Program and has served as special consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 2011, Sperling has served annually on the U.S. News & World Report’s panel of 22 national dietary experts evaluating the country’s most popular diets for the publication’s “Best Diets” rankings.

Congratulations Dr. Sperling! We are happy to have you on the Emory team.

About Dr. Laurence Sperling

Dr. Laurence Sperling

Dr. Sperling specializes in internal medicine and cardiology—his areas of clinical interest are cardiac catheterization, cardiac rehabilitation, general cardiology, echocardiogram, lipid metabolism, and electron beam computed tomography. Dr. Sperling has received various awards from the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association Council, and Emory University Hospital and has been a special consultant to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Sperling received his undergraduate degree from Emory College and graduated with his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine in 1989. He subsequently completed eight additional years of training at Emory, including a residency in internal medicine, chief resident year at Emory University Hospital, a National Institutes of Health-supported research fellowship in molecular and vascular medicine and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases.

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