Posts Tagged ‘heart disease prevention’

Understanding Heart Disease in Women

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi, Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist, recently conducted a live web chat on the topic of women and heart disease. During the chat, Dr. Shirazi provided participants with information ranging from how women can prevent heart disease to the importance of getting treatment right away, and details on the latest research underway to combat heart disease in women.

One of our attendees in Tuesday’s chat asked Dr. Shirazi, “What is the best diet for patients with heart disease?” Dr. Shirazi noted that the most effective diet will depend on each person’s specific risk factors for heart disease, but in general, the most recent evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet is heart healthy. Dr. Shirazi explained that the Mediterranean Diet is rich in lean protein (poultry), good fats (olive oil) and omega-3s (fatty fish), and low in saturated fats and bad carbohydrates. And like any healthy diet, the Mediterranean Diet is low in sodium and loaded with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Another great question fielded by Dr. Shirazi in Tuesday’s live chat was related to symptoms and warning signs of heart disease, “I have read that symptoms of coronary heart disease are different in woman than in men, but when symptoms present, at what point should you seek medical attention? I sometimes feel chest discomfort, even sharp pains, but how will I know if it’s more serious than say stress for example?” Dr. Shirazi says patients should trust their instincts if something doesn’t “feel right,” in which case, Dr. Shirazi recommends seeing a medical professional. “A provider will be able to evaluate your symptoms and do appropriate screening. If you’re having any symptoms such as: chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, excessive fatigue, dizziness, loss of consciousness, or abdominal pain (to list a few), you should see your primary care physician. Your cardiologist will then be able to further assess your risk for heart disease,” she says.

In addition to the questions above, Dr. Shirazi answered questions related to cholesterol levels, hormone replacement therapy, and several other topics specific to heart disease in women. Most importantly, though, she reminded participants to take action immediately if they are at risk for, or experiencing symptoms of, heart disease.

For more information, check out the Women and Heart Disease chat transcript.

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Join us for a Heart Disease Prevention Event in April and May!

April/May Heart Disease Prevention Events AtlantaThe HeartWise℠ Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

You can register for our HeartWise events online!

♥ How to Live to 100!
Shanna Stewart, Exercise & Health Science Intern
Monday, April 1, 8:30am – 9:00am, Repeated at 12:00 – 12:30pm

♥ Take Care of those FEET!
Dr. Frank Sinkoe
Friday, April 5, 11:45am – 12:15pm

♥ WomenHeart of Atlanta: Support Group
Monday, April 8, 12pm – 1:15pm

♥ Reading Food Labels
Tasha Mickens, RD, LD, CDE
Monday, April 15, 12pm – 12:30pm

♥ Why Sleep is so Important
Jennifer James, Exercise Physiologist
Monday, April 22, 12:00pm – 12:30pm

♥ Basic Diabetes Nutrition
Tasha Mickens, RD, LD, CDE
Monday, May 6, 12:00pm – 12:30pm

♥ WomenHeart of Atlanta: Support Group
Monday, May 13, 12pm – 1:15pm

♥ Advanced Carbohydrate Counting
Tasha Mickens, RD, LD, CDE
Monday, May 20, 12:00pm – 12:30pm

Admission is free and everyone is welcome and parking is validated for up to 2 hours. Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for a HeartWise lecture online.

*If you would like to purchase a t-shirt or calendar where the proceeds go to the HeartWise scholarship fund which allows patients who run into financial challenges continue the wellness and prevention, please call 404-778-2850.

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Join us for a Heart Disease Prevention Event in March!

Heart events in Atlanta March 2013The HeartWise℠ Risk Reduction Program Lecture Series aims to reduce people’s risk of heart disease through education and interaction. In addition to serving patients who currently suffer from heart disease, we also provide help to individuals who could be at risk for heart complications in the future including those who smoke, do not exercise or have high blood pressure.

You can register for our HeartWise events online!

WomenHeart of Atlanta: Support Group
Monday, March 11, 12pm – 1:15pm

Fundamentals of Strength Training
Clay Knight, Exercise Physiologist
Monday, March 18, 8:30am – 9:00am, Repeated at 12pm – 12:3pm

Angina
Jane Whitmer, RN
Monday, March 25, 12pm – 12:30pm

Benefits of Vitamin D
Paul White, MD, Rehabilitation Medicine Resident
Wednesday, March 20, 11:30am – 12pm

Admission is free and everyone is welcome and parking is validated for up to 2 hours. Call 404-778-2850 to reserve your seat, or you can sign up for a HeartWise lecture online.

*If you would like to purchase a t-shirt or calendar where the proceeds go to the HeartWise scholarship fund which allows patients who run into financial challenges continue the wellness and prevention, please call 404-778-2850.

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Lose Weight in 2013 with the 250/250 Plan!

Cut Calories with 250/250 Weight Loss PlanAre you ready to try a new method to get your body ready for bathing suit season? If so, you are in luck! Emory cardiologist, Nanette Wenger, MD created a simple new plan to help you lose weight. It is a step process called the 250/250 plan. You don’t have to add a lot of exercise time or drastically alter your eating habits.

The first step of the 250/250 weight loss plan is to find a way to cut 250 calories out of your diet. This could be as simple as cutting out a soda beverage at lunch or a beer at night. The second step is to step up your physical activity level and burn 250 calories a day. You can do this with simple activities like taking the stairs, parking in the back of the parking lot and walking to the store, doing some gardening or adding some minutes to your daily dog walk.

If you follow this simple weight loss plan you could lose up to a pound a week. Watch the full Fox 5 interview below for more detailed information on how to get your body in tip top shape for summer!

Emory Healthcare is a proud partner of the American Heart Association in the My Heart. My Life. Campaign that helps raise awareness of how to prevent heart disease.

About Nanette Wenger
Nanette K. Wenger, MD, MACC, MACP, FAHADr. Wenger is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and a Consultant to the Emory Heart and Vascular Center. Dr. Wenger is a graduate of Hunter College (summa cum laude) and the Harvard Medical School. She had her residency training in Internal Medicine and Cardiology fellowship at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and additional Fellowship in Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Wenger is a Past Vice-President of the American Heart Association, past Governor for Georgia of the American College of Cardiology, is a Past-President of the Georgia Heart Association. She has served as a member and frequently chairperson of over 500 committees, scientific advisory boards, task forces, and councils of the American Medical Association, the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Society of Geriatric Cardiology. She has served on more than 40 standing committees of Emory University, and served on the University Faculty Council, chairing its Faculty Life Course Committee. The American Heart Association awarded her the Distinguished Achievement Award, the Women in Cardiology Mentoring Award, and the highest award of the Association, the Gold Heart Award. She received the James E. Bruce Memorial Award of the American College of Physicians, for Distinguished Contributions in Preventive Medicine, and was named Physician of the Year by the American Heart Association. She is listed in Best Doctors in America.

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New Research Shows Calcium Supplements May Be Dangerous to a Man’s Heart

Calcium Supplements Man Heart Disease StrokeA recent study by the National Cancer Institute and other researchers showed that men who consumed more than 1,000 mg of calcium a day experienced a higher risk of death from heart disease and stroke after the 12 year study period.

Emory Healthcare and Saint Joseph’s Hospital cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD providers her recommendations to her patients about calcium supplements. She recommends that her patients eat foods high in calcium such as skim milk and Greek yogurt and avoid the supplements.

Read the full USA Today article to find out more recommendations about how to protect your heart in the most appropriate ways.

Happy Valentine’s Day: Hope For the Broken Hearted

Heartbreak, heartache, and heart broken are not words you would typically associate with the day of love (Valentine’s Day)…Or are they?

When February rolls around each year, we’re bombarded with messages and sentiments of love.  Couples, families and friends begin to plan for Valentine’s Day, the day of love and dinner reservations are made, gifts are purchased, cards are written, and for those that are really lucky, the decadence of chocolate awaits. For some of us though, Valentine’s Day can be difficult if that special someone is no longer around. The overwhelming symbolism of love may cause them to reminisce and feel a deep pain. We know this pain, usually felt in the heart, as a broken heart, but in the medical world this condition (yes, it’s a real medical condition) is known as acute stress cardiomyopathy.

Acute stress cardiomyopathy or “broken heart syndrome” is a relatively temporary heart condition brought on by stressful situations, such as a death of a loved one, or the complete shock of an unexpected break up. The syndrome can lead to congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, and potentially life-threatening heart rhythm abnormalities.

It’s been reported that patients, mostly women, have gone to the emergency room due to classic heart attack symptoms caused by the shock,but when doctors performed diagnostic tests, such as an electrocardiogram, the results tended to look very different from regular heart attack EKGs. Furthermore, subsequent tests showed that the heart tissue was not damaged at all.

Luckily, the symptoms of broken heart syndrome are treatable and the condition usually reverses itself in a matter of time. So if you’ve lost a love one or experienced a break up recently, although Valentine’s Day may be more difficult than most days, fear not–the once a year holiday and the detriment of loneliness will pass. Perhaps take the holiday as an opportunity to do something healthy for yourself. Relax, or knock a few things off your to-do list, try out a new recipe or craft, or even use the holiday as an opportunity to remind a friend how much they mean to you.

Tell us, have you ever experienced the broken heart syndrome? If so, how’d you get through it?

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Two Emory Physicians Honored with National Red Dress Award!

Dr. Leslee ShawDr. Sanjay GuptaWoman’s Day magazine is honoring Leslee Shaw, PhD, and Sanjay Gupta, MD, with two of its four Red Dress Awards for 2013. The award honors those who have made significant contributions in the fight against heart disease among women.

Dr. Shaw and Dr. Gupta join the ranks of other distinguished Red Dress award recipients including United States Surgeon General Regina M. Benjamin, renowned journalist Barbara Walters and Elizabeth Nabel, MD, former head of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Dr. Shaw is a professor of medicine at Emory School of Medicine and co-directs the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute. She currently serves on the Cardiovascular Imaging Committee for the American Heart Association and is on the Board of Directors for the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. She is a past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology.

Dr. Shaw Red Dress AwardHer areas of interest and expertise include test accuracy, risk assessment, prognosis and cost efficiency—with a particular emphasis on the role of how diagnostic tests work differently to assess heart disease risk in various ethnic groups and in women versus men.

Dr. Gupta is CNN’s chief medical correspondent and is an assistant professor of neurosurgery at Emory School of Medicine and associate chief of neurosurgery at Grady Memorial Hospital. He is a practicing neurosurgeon at Emory University and Grady hospitals.

Gupta’s medical training and public health policy experience distinguish his reporting on a range of medical and scientific topics including brain injury, disaster recovery, health care reform, fitness, military medicine, HIV/AIDS and other areas.

The prestigious award will be presented on February 12 at Lincoln Center in New York City. To learn more about this award visit Red Dress Awards 2013 – Woman’s Day.

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Welcome Aboard : Dr. Woodhouse and Dr. Shonkoff

Emory Heart & Vascular Center is excited to welcome Dr. Sheila Woodhouse and Dr. David Shonkoff to the Emory team! Doctors, Woodhouse and Shonkoff will practice at 5 locations around Gwinnett County in Duluth (2 locations), Johns Creek, Snellville and Lawrenceville.*

The Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Gwinnett offers a comprehensive spectrum of in-office cardiac and vascular diagnostic testing and treatments. Some of the services the practice will provide cardiology patients are echocardiography, stress echocardiography, nuclear stress testing, treadmill stress testing, carotid duplex ultrasound imaging, ankle-brachial index (ABI) testing and holter and event monitoring.

Dr. Woodhouse specializes in women with heart disease, valve disease and arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, atherosclerotic heart disease and preventive cardiology, risk factor modification management and cardiac related high risk pregnancies and post pardum cardiac care. Impressively, she is triple boarded in cardiovascular imaging modalities and has particular interest in cardiac and vascular imaging.

Dr. Shonkoff specializes in congestive heart failure, heart disease prevention, vavular heart disease, congenital heart disease, refractory hypertension, and cardiac imaging.

Locations
Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Duluth
1845 Satellite Boulevard, Suite 500
Duluth, Georgia 30097

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Johns Creek
6335 Hospital Parkway, Suite 110
Johns Creek, Georgia, 30097

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Eastside
1608 Tree Lane, Suite 101
Snellville, Georgia 30078

Saint Joseph’s Medical Group
4855 RiverGreen Parkway
Duluth, GA 30096

Emory Heart & Vascular Center – Lawrenceville
771 Old Norcross Road
Suite 105
Lawrenceville, GA 30046

For hours of operation and to schedule an appointment please call 404-778-6670 or 404-778-6590.

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Whip your heart in shape at the Emory Heartwise Bootcamp!

Heart Month Events AtlantaCelebrate Heart Month by attending the Emory HeartWiseSM Prevention Bootcamp! This exciting event focuses on educating consumers about how to manage/lower risk factors associated with heart disease and stroke. Over the course of the full-day program, there will be breakout sessions on nutrition, cooking demonstrations, women and heart disease, foot care, yoga, stretching, healthy weight loss and starting an exercise program. Physicians and health care providers from across Emory Healthcare will be hosting the lectures in this informative session!

HeartWise Heart Disease Prevention Bootcamp Event Details:

Date: Saturday, February, 9, 2013
Time: 8:15 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. with continental breakfast
Where: Emory Conference Center Hotel
1615 Clifton Road Northeast
Atlanta, GA 30322
Cost: $25 – this fee covers the cost of the educational program, handouts, parking, breakfast and lunch.

For more information or to register please call Emory HealthConnection to register – 404-778-7777 or register online!

This program was made possible from an educational grant from Georgia Power.

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Dr. Lundberg Shares Her Heart Healthy Holiday Gift Ideas

Emory Healthcare and Saint Joseph’s physician Gina Lundberg, MD provides gift suggestions to help the people you love stay healthy this holiday season. She strongly advocates giving gifts that promote healthy activity to your children to start them off with healthy habits at a young age.

View the full CNN Health Minute and get more tips about good healthy gift options for your family and friends!

About Gina Lundberg, MD

Gina Price Lundberg, MD FACC is the Director of the Heart Center for Women. She founded and directed The Women’s Heart Center, the first women’s cardiac prevention program in the state of Georgia in 1998.

She was named by Governor Sonny Perdue to the Advisory Board for Women’s Health, Georgia Department of Women’s Health, Department of Community Health for 2007-2008. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University and teaches cardiology fellows at Grady Hospital. She also teaches medical students from the Medical College of Georgia in preventive cardiology. She is a member of the American College of Cardiologist’s Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.

Dr. Gina Lundberg

She has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta since 2001. She has been involved with the Go Red for Women campaign since it launched in 2004. She has been on the Southeast Affiliate for the AHA’s Strategic Initiative Committee representing Go Red for Women. She is national speaker for the American Heart Association. She has also been working with the national organization, Sister to Sister Foundation from 2004 till the present with their Atlanta program.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women in Glamour Magazine, MD News, the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, the Atlanta Business Chronicle, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and other magazines. She has been interviewed on numerous local news shows and many radio programs over the years. Dr. Lundberg has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in Atlanta,GA. She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in private practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and re-certified in both in 2002. She has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career.