Posts Tagged ‘heart disease prevention’

Did you Know that Stroke is the Third Leading Cause of Death in Women? Learn how to Protect Yourself!

StrokeRisk factors for heart disease and stroke can be different for women versus men so it is exciting to note that earlier this year, the American Heart Association in conjunction with the American Stroke Association released new stroke prevention guidelines specifically for women!

The guidelines, based on scientific findings, offer tips on how to reduce risk factors for stroke as well as treatment protocol if a stroke does occur. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association outlines the following:

  • Women who have had high blood pressure before pregnancy she be closely monitored by a physician to evaluate the need for adding medications to try to lower the risk for preeclampsia.
  • The following are risk factors that increase the risk for stroke:
    • Obesity
    • Smoking
    • High cholesterol

A patient should work with her physician to determine the best way to reduce these risk factors with lifestyle modifications such as diet and exercise.

  • Women who had preeclampsia, a condition some women develop during pregnancy that is typically characterized by high blood pressure, swelling and fluid retention, have a higher probability of stroke during or after pregnancy. Therefore, women who have had preeclampsia should develop a prevention plan in conjunction with their physician in order to mitigate the risk from this condition.
  • Women who are pregnant with moderate to severe high blood pressure should work with their physician to determine if they should be actively treated for the condition.
  • Birth control pills in combination with high blood pressure can increase the risk of stroke in female patients. Therefore, before a woman is prescribed birth control pills, she should be screened for high blood pressure.
  • If you suffer from migraine headaches, stop smoking! Scientific research shows that women with migraine headaches who smoke are at higher risk for a stroke.
  • Get screened for atrial fibrillation if you are a woman over 75 years old.

The Emory Women’s Heart Center offers screenings for women who could be at risk for heart disease. Take the short online quiz to see if you are at risk.

If you have one or more risk factors, we encourage you to schedule a comprehensive heart screening. During the screening you will develop an individualized risk reduction action plan to help prevent heart disease and stroke. Heart disease and stroke are preventable if you take action to develop a healthy lifestyle!

Heart Disease Screening

Also, to get more information on how to reduce your risk, we invite you to attend a Stroke Awareness Event at Emory Healthcare during May!

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

About Gina Lundberg

Gina Lundberg, MDGina Price Lundberg, MD, FACC, Emory Women’s Heart Center Clinical Director, is a Preventive Cardiologist with Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. She is a National American Heart Association (AHA) spokesperson and has been a Board Member for Atlanta chapter from 2001 till 2007. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for American Heart Association’s North Fulton/ Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009 she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is also a Circle of Red founding member and Cor Vitae member for AHA.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women in various media channels including CNN and in USA Today. Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the Advisory Board for the Department of Women’s Health for the State of Georgia in 2007 till 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman Magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008 Atlanta Woman Magazine named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine.

Related Links

Emory Women’s Heart Center
Quiz – Are you at Risk for Heart Disease
Become aware of the risks, signs and symptoms of stroke
Attend a Stroke Awareness Event at Emory Healthcare
Schedule Your arrhythmia Screenings

Did you know that you can exercise at work even if you have a desk job?

Exercise at WorkThe Emory Center for Heart Disease Prevention staff are practicing what they preach and are doing their best to get at least 30 minutes of physical activity most days of the week. They recently acquired 2 bike pedal systems that fit under the desk so staff can exercise while working. These unique devices are small and easy to use and can be used for short periods of time to get your heart pumping. After using the bike pedals, Emory registered nurse Charlotte Applequist, RN commented, “I was surprised that I burned a total of 142 calories pedaling on and off through out the day! A lot of days I don’t get to workout at home, so this was great! My mood is better at work as well; my stress level was reduced.”

Emory Senior Medical Secretary Patty Watson also commented, “I sit a lot at work and my commute is two hours round trip to Emory. Already, I can feel the benefit of stronger legs and mentally I feel more invigorated.”

Exercise is one part of the equation in the fight against heart disease but Emory Women’s Heart Center Nurse Practitioner Chris Nell-Dybdahl also recommends that in order to improve cardiovascular health you must eat a heart healthy Mediterranean – style diet, reduce stress and follow a prevention plan.

Heart Disease Screening

To find out if you are at risk for heart disease, schedule your heart screening today by calling 404-778-7777 or visit emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart

If you work on or near the Emory campus, drop by the Emory Heart Disease Prevention Center at The Emory Clinic, Second Floor Cardiology and see what the fuss is all about as well as inquire about purchasing these for your office!

About Christine Nell-Dybdahl, NP-C, MPH, MSN

Christine Nell – Dybdahl, NP – C, MPH, MSN has been a registered nurse since 1994 and a nurse practitioner since 1998. She brings to the practice over 20 years of cardiology experience. She is the clinical nurse director for Emory’s Center for Heart Disease Prevention and is active with the Emory’s Women’s Heart Program. She received her BSN from Kent State University and her dual master degrees from Emory University in nursing (board certified family nurse practitioner) and public health (health education and promotion). Her interests include cardiovascular disease prevention, heart healthy life style changes, cholesterol abnormalities, women’s heart care, and family-involved chronic heart disease management. Chris is a member of the American College of Cardiology, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She makes it a priority to connect interested patients and researchers at Emory. She is the founder and clinical leader of the Women Living with Angina Support Group. She has co-authored several journal articles and has spoken at many conferences on a wide variety of topics

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

About the Emory Heart Disease Prevention Center

Emory Heart Disease Prevention specialists provide a collaborative and comprehensive approach to the prevention, detection and reversal of heart disease. We offer a full range of prevention and wellness programs that will help you stay healthy. You can count on our commitment to guiding you to a healthier way of life for yourself and those you love.

Want to Buy Your Mom a Gift that Counts this Year for Mother’s Day?

go-red-blogWell, now you can! Attend an Emory Heart Health Event and buy your mother a Women’s Heart Screening Gift Certificate! Heart disease kills more women each year than all the cancers combined and in many cases heart disease is preventable. Take time to educate yourself and your family on how to prevent, detect and treat heart disease by attending a heart health event at Emory University Hospital Midtown on Friday, May 9. During the educational event, participants will have an opportunity to meet and learn from Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians and staff as well as meet with different educational vendors who promote a healthy lifestyle.

Event Details

  • Date: Friday, May 9, 2014
  • Time: 7:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. – Heart health event – Emory University Hospital Midtown’s atrium
    Noon – Heart health educational event – How to Prevent, Detect and Treat Heart Disease in Women, a presentation delivered by Emory Women’s Heart Center physician Alexis Cutchins, MD
  • Location: Emory University Hospital Midtown
    550 Peachtree Street NE
    Atlanta, GA 30308

The gift certificates for a comprehensive heart screening includes:

  • Comprehensive physical exam
  • Cardiovascular risk factor analysis
  • Cholesterol analysis
  • Glucose analysis
  • Body Mass Index
  • Blood Pressure
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Intensive Risk Factor Education – You will receive a personalized Healthy Eating & Exercise Plan
  • Cholesterol Education: Smoking Cessation & Stress Management

To learn more or to register for this women’s heart health event, please call Emory HealthConnection℠ at 404-778-7777.

The events are free! Parking will be available in hospitals’ main parking lots.

Take action to prevent heart disease by attending the women’s heart health event and buying a gift certificate for your mother to get her heart checked!

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Heart Disease Screening Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

What is Congestive Heart Failure? Can I Prevent It?

Heart Disease Risk QuizMore than 5 million Americans live with Congestive Heart Failure, and heart failure costs the United States more than $32 billion dollars each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Congestive heart failure affects all ages including children, adolescents, adults and the elderly, and is equally prevalent among women and men. There are two conditions that cause congestive heart failure; systolic dysfunction and diastolic dysfunction. Systolic dysfunction is when the heart muscle becomes weak and cannot pump blood adequately. Diastolic dysfunction is when the heart muscle becomes very thick and stiff making it difficult for the heart to fill with blood (often a result of poorly controlled high blood pressure and a frequent causes of heart failure hospital admissions in women).

Congestive heart failure occurs when the heart is not able to pump blood to all the organs and tissues of the body (either because it is too weak or because it is not filling well enough). Instead of going where it needs to go, fluid can back up into different organs in the body. This fluid “congestion” is what gives this condition its name. Initial symptoms of congestive heart failure are swelling, heavy breathing and fatigue.

Symptoms of Congestive Heart Failure

Some examples of the effect congestive heart failure can have on different organs of the body are:

  • The lungs can become congested – called a pulmonary edema – which can lead to breathing problems, a decreased ability to exercise, and fatigue.
  • Fluid can build up in the liver, which decreases its ability to get rid of the body’s toxins and create important proteins needed to function.
  • The Gastro-intestinal tract can be affected and may become less likely to absorb much-needed nutrients and medicines.
  • Fluid also commonly swells up in the ankles, feet, legs and arms – called edema.
  • Eventually, if untreated, all parts of the body can be negatively affected.

The good news is that congestive heart failure can be prevented!

Preventing Congestive Heart Failure

  • Regularly monitor your blood pressure and if you are diagnosed with hypertension work with your physician to develop the best approach to lower it. Blood pressure control is the best way to stop congestive heart failure from occurring
  • Quit smoking
  • Lose weight (if you are overweight)
  • Exercise more often – it is recommended to exercise 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week in order to keep your heart healthy and reduce risk of developing coronary artery disease
  • Surgery, when appropriate, for those patients with congestive heart failure due to valvular disease.
  • Medication – work with your Emory Women’s Heart Center specialist to develop the best treatment plan for you if you have had a heart attack or have high blood pressure. This will ensure your heart maintains the best condition possible as you move forward.

 

Heart Disease Screening

Heart disease may be prevented if you are motivated to take the necessary steps to protect your heart! Schedule your comprehensive cardiovascular screening today to assess your risk for heart disease and to develop your personalized prevention plan.

Take action today to potentially save a life!

Related Resources:

 

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Alexis Cutchins, MD is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in Vascular Biology and a clinical fellowship in Cardiovascular Diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

 

About Dr. Cutchins

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins has published several different articles on adipose tissue distribution and obesity in journals such as Circulation Research, Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Stroke and has a special interest in the effects of adipose tissue distribution on the heart.

Dr. Cutchins is board certified in Internal Medicine (2007) and Cardiovascular Diseases (2012). She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Cutchins sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Saint Joseph’s.
She enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband, their three daughters and their dog. She loves to cook and ride horses.

Takeaways from Dr. Murphy and Dr. Halkos’ Chat on Mitral Valve Disease

Mitral Valve Disease Q&AThank you for attending the live chat on mitral valve disease on Tuesday, February 25. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here).

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Jean -What precautions need to be taken when diagnosed?

halkos-michael

Dr. Halkos: 

Jean – In general, patients with mitral valve disorders need to take special precautions against infection during certain procedures, such as dental cleaning.  It is important to let providers that take care of you know you have mitral valve disorders when seeing them so they can take the necessary precautions.

Takeaways from Dr. Cutchins’ Chat on Heart Disease in Women

Heart Disease PreventionThank you for attending the live chat on women and heart disease on Tuesday, February 11. We had a great discussion, so thank you all who posed questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here). We hope this means the word is spreading that heart disease is the number one killer of women and in many cases it is preventable if we take action.

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Kim – Do you have advice for how we handle ER/EC encounters and successfully get the ER/EC doc/ staff to acknowledge active Heart Disease in the pre-menopausal woman?? With newer diagnoses such as coronary endothelial dysfunction/severe coronary vasospasms for me diastolic CHF due to the preceding perhaps advice on how to navigate our local healthcare systems when we cannot get to Emory. Are these disorders and often the testing that goes along with them that is often NORMAL, are they becoming more well-versed to the medical establishments or not?

Dr. Alexis Cutchins

Dr. Cutchins: 

Kim – This is a very good question but not so easy to answer. The Emory Women’s Heart Center is working hard on trying to educate physicians in our communities about heart disease in women. We are stressing to these physicians that heart disease can exist with negative ED test results. That said, when a woman presents to the ED with symptoms the physicians are doing their best to make sure there is nothing acute or life threatening going on with the patient. If all ED tests are normal and the patient is still concerned, the patient should follow up afterwards with a cardiologist who specializes in women with heart disease. All of the diseases you have described above are real and should be taken seriously. We have multiple treatment options for patients who fall into those categories. To find out more information you can visit emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart.

Tonia – Recently diagnosed with CHF- should I be concerned about my heart murmur?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins: 

Hi Tonia. Although I can’t speak to your condition without seeing you in person, I can tell you that in general, it’s not uncommon for patients with CHF (congestive heart failure) to have heart murmurs. Typically, I recommend patients speak to their physician and ask their physician(s) to perform an echo (heart ultrasound) if it has not been imaged already.

A heart murmur could be caused from any number of factors including:

  • Increased flow across a heart valve
  • Leaking of a heart valve
  • Tightening of a heart valve.

Stay in close connection with your cardiologist to evaluate your case. If you need a cardiologist who specializes in heart disease and women, you can choose an Emory Women’s Heart Center physician by calling 404-778-7777 or visiting emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart.

Flora – I have atrial fibrillation (AF) will I get better?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins:

Hi Flora. I can’t speak to your condition without seeing you in person, but for many people, atrial fibrillation can get better. Some people have atrial fibrillation that comes and goes and some are in AF all the time. Typically, depending on a patient’s symptoms while they are in AF there are a variety of treatment options available ranging from medications to surgical procedures. How an individual feels with the diagnosis can vary so it is important to visit your cardiologist and discuss your particular case in person.

Imelda – Is taking baby aspirin now is safe?

Dr. Alexis Cutchins

Dr. Cutchins:

Like most medication, taking baby aspirin can provide side effects and is risky in some populations of people. In some cases it can cause gastrointestinal bleeding. In certain populations, such as women over the age of 65, the benefit outweighs the risk. For women over 65 who are at risk for heart disease and have well controlled blood pressure, a baby aspirin is recommended to decrease the risk of stroke and heart attack. Also women of any age with diabetes or diagnosed coronary artery disease, who do not have a contraindication, typically should take a daily baby aspirin. We always recommend to patients that they consult with their physician prior to taking any new medication to make sure it does not interact with any other medication the patient may be taking.

Imelda – Is fish oil and vitamin E is good for the heart?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins:

Fish oil is useful for women with high cholesterol or triglyceride levels. The recommendation is to take 1800mg/day of “EPA” which should be found on the bottle. Also fatty fish such as salmon, is a great source of Omega-3 fatty acids that are protective. For more information on how fish oil can improve your heart & brain health please visit this blog on fish oil, posted last week on the Emory Advancing your Health Blog.

I am not as familiar with the benefits and risks associated with taking Vitamin E but it is not specifically recommended for women by the American Heart Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Dr. Cutchins
Alexis Cutchins, MD is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

Dr. Cutchins has published several different articles on adipose tissue distribution and obesity in journals such as Circulation Research, Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Stroke and has a special interest in the effects of adipose tissue distribution on the heart.

Dr. Cutchins is board certified in Internal Medicine (2007) and Cardiovascular Diseases (2012). She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.
Dr. Cutchins sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Saint Joseph’s.

She enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband, their three daughters and their dog. She loves to cook and ride horses.

Related Links

Heart Disease is Not Just a “Man’s Disease”

Heart Disease PreventionHeart disease is often considered “a man’s disease” so you may be surprised to learn that over 8.6 million women worldwide die from heart disease each year. This accounts for over 1/3 of all deaths in women. In fact, heart disease kills 6 times more women each year compared to breast cancer.*

Interesting Facts on Heart Disease in Women Vs. Men:

  • Women often times wait longer than men to go to an emergency room for treatment while having a heart attack.
  • Physicians, not specifically trained in women and heart disease, some times have a harder time diagnosing heart attacks in women because of the differences in presentation of symptoms.
  • Women’s hearts respond better than men’s hearts to healthy changes in lifestyle.
  • Within a year after a heart attack, 38% of women will die, compared to 25% of men.
  • Women are more than 2 times more likely to die after bypass surgery then men.

Go Red for Your Heart In February

Go Red Events AtlantaHeart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States, but in many cases it’s preventable. That’s why Emory Healthcare would like to invite you to a women’s heart health event in February, either at our Emory University Hospital Midtown campus, or our Emory University Hospital campus.

During these fun, educational events, participants will have an opportunity to meet Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians and staff and learn about how to prevent, detect and treat heart disease. In addition, the events feature nutrition consultations, food and promotional vendors, as well as body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure screenings for attendees.

RSVP: 404-778-7777

Go Red Event Details

Date: Friday, February 14, 2014
Program: 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. — Heart Health event in the hospital’s atrium
12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. — How to Prevent, Detect and Treat Heart Disease in Women, a presentation delivered by Emory Women’s Heart Center physician Alexis Cutchins, MD

Location: Emory University Hospital Midtown
550 Peachtree Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30308

Women with Diabetes are Four Times More Likely to Develop Heart Disease

A new research study from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine demonstrated that women under 60 who have diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop coronary artery disease compared to those without diabetes. This news is especially important as none of the subjects had heart disease at the time of their enrollment.

In addition, we know that women under the age of 60 tend to have lower rates of heart disease compared to their male counterparts. However, this study shows that the presence of diabetes eliminated that gender disparity. These findings highlight the need for aggressive screening and management of other risk factors for coronary heart disease among younger diabetic women.

It is imperative to recognize that heart disease can present differently in women compared to men. Women often wait longer to get help and this can lead to irreversible damage to the heart muscle.

The most common symptoms of heart disease in women are :

  1. Chest Pain
  2. Pain in the back, neck, arms or jaw
  3. Upper abdominal pain
  4. Nausea or lightheadedness
  5. Shortness of breath
  6. Sweating
  7. Fatigue

If you suspect you have heart disease, visit your physician to be screened. You can check out the Emory Women’s Heart Center for details on screening. If you suspect you are having a heart attack, get help immediately. Remember, every minute makes a difference and could save your life.

About Dr. Isiadinso
Ijeoma Isiadinso, M.D.Ijeoma Isiadinso, MD MPH is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as Chief Fellow during her final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.
Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools, universities, and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Emory Cardiac Rehabilitation Patient Receives Volunteer Award!

Wayland Moore HeartWise Patient

Emory cardiac rehabilitation/HeartWise patient, Mr. Wayland Moore recently received the Creativity & Arts at Emory Healthcare Volunteer Award. Mr. Moore is a professional artist who has lived and worked around the Emory area for 55 years. He created ‘Art with Heart’ to help stimulate and challenge the minds of the Emory cardiac rehabilitation patients in a creative way following a heart event (heart attack, open heart surgery).

The 6 week, Art with Heart, class allows novice and intermediate artists to expand their skills in a fun and supportive environment. The monies donated from the class help to fund the scholarship program which allows Emory cardiac rehabilitation patients who experience a financial crisis to continue to exercise in a medically supervised cardiac rehabilitation program.

The class meets 4 – 5 times a year at the HeartWiseSM Risk Reduction Program located on the 5th floor of the 1525 Clifton Road building on Emory University Hospital campus. All of Mr. Moore’s time and energy is donated to help the patients in class. The current class of ‘patient artists’ is full to capacity. The art that the class creates is displayed in full light each year at the annual holiday party for the HeartWise program. Each year more art is shown and excitement is raised because of the bond and creativity that has been fostered in Mr. Moore’s class.

We are proud to have Mr. Moore as a part of the Emory cardiac rehabilitation team! Congratulations on a well deserved award!

About HeartWise℠

Emory’s Cardiac Rehabilitation Program / HeartWise℠ Risk Reduction Program helps patients reduce their risk of heart disease. Cardiac Rehabilitation / HeartWise℠ serves not only patients who currently suffer from heart disease, but also aims to identify those who could be candidates for problems down the road (smokers, people who do not exercise, a person with high blood pressure), and try to lead them down a healthier path. To learn more visit http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/heart-disease-prevention/about-us/index.html

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