Posts Tagged ‘Heart Condition’

Heart Disease is the Number One Killer of Women – Take Action Now to Avoid Being a Statistic!

Many people consider heart disease to be a predominantly male-oriented condition. However, heart disease is the number one killer in women and affects one out of every three in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart.  When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

“The scary thing is that heart attacks in females are more likely to be fatal than in men,” explains Farheen Shirazi, Cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Johns Creek. “Far too often, women ignore the warning signs of a heart attack and do not seek immediate medical attention. As time elapses, the muscles of the heart weaken, causing severe or life-threatening damage.”

Thankfully the awareness about heart disease continues to be on the rise. “The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.”

How can you educate yourself? Join Dr. Shirazi on Tuesday, April 9 for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions such as: what women can do to prevent heart disease, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women.


 About Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Farheen Shirazi, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center.  She specializes in preventive cardiology and heart disease in women.  Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine, her Internship at New York University School of Medicine, her residency at Stanford Hospital and her Fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Shirazi has been practicing at Emory since 2012 and primarily sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Cumming She is passionate about educating women about how to prevent heart disease.

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Take-Aways from Cardiac Arrest Web Chat

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Young AthletesThank you for those who were able to participate in the Emory Heart & Vascular Live Chat on Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes. I was very impressed by many of your questions on the topic of cardiac arrest, and happy to be able to answer them. If you were not able to join me, you can view the Sudden Cardiac Arrest chat transcript here.

In the chat, we covered a variety of important topics pertaining to cardiac arrest symptoms, warning signs, and risk factors. All parents, coaches, and supporters of young athletes should be aware of these warning signs and know how to respond when they present themselves. There are a few key takeaways from last week’s chat that I would like to reiterate:

  1. Children and adults can survive sudden cardiac arrest if parents and others in the area act quickly.
  2. We encourage all coaches and parents learn CPR.
  3. In addition, we recommend obtaining an AED for all sports facilities. The equipment can be costly, but can save the life of a young athlete.

During the chat, there was also a question regarding what sports/activities were deemed too strenuous for those with heart disease. Please refer to the chart below that outlines the classification of competitive sports. The acceptable competive sports for those patients who have been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most other types of heart disease are:

    • Billiards
    • Bowling
    • Cricket
    • Curling
    • Golf
    • Riflery

Please note that if you think you could be at risk for HCM you should visit your primary care physician for an evaluation. If the physician clears you or your child you do not need to limit activity based on the above chart.

If you have additional questions about sudden cardiac arrest in general, or cardiac arrest in young athletes, please use the comments section below. Please also feel free to use the comments section to let us know if you have other heart and vascular topics you would like to cover in future live chats!

Thanks again for a great chat!

Author: B. Robinson Williams, III, M.D.

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