Posts Tagged ‘heart attack symptoms’

How to Prevent Coronary Heart Disease

Coronary Heart Disease PreventionCoronary heart disease (CHD) is the buildup of plaque within the heart’s arteries, which causes a decrease in blood flow. When a coronary artery becomes fully blocked and blood flow has stopped, a heart attack results. As you may know, heart attacks may permanently damage the heart muscle.

Risk factors for CHD include: high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure, family history, diabetes, smoking, obesity, being post-menopausal for women and being older than 45 for men. The more risk factors you have, the greater your chance of developing CHD.

CHD and heart attacks are preventable. Living a healthy lifestyle with good nutrition, stress reduction, weight management and physical activity is key. CHD may begin in childhood, and initial plaque buildup may be detected as early as the teenage years.

According to the National Institute of Health, common symptoms of coronary heart disease include shortness of breath and angina (pain or a feeling of increased pressure in the chest). Less common symptoms include nausea, sweating, fatigue, dizziness and decreased exercise tolerance.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, call 911 immediately.

If you would like to make an appointment to be evaluated for coronary heart disease by an interventional cardiologist, please call HealthConnection at 404-778-7777.

For heart-healthy recipe ideas, click here.

About Dr. Chang

George Chang, MDGeorge Chang MD, FACC is a board certified interventional cardiologist practicing at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital (ESJH). He has been at ESJH since 1999 and is currently serving as Chief of Physician Services for Emory Clinic at Emory Saint Joseph’s. He completed his undergraduate studies at Baylor University and Cardiovascular Fellowship at Emory University. He has an appointment as Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Emory University School of Medicine.

Is Jaw Pain a Warning Sign of a Heart Attack?

jaw painWhile chest pain is the most common symptom of a heart attack in both men and women, it may not be the most prominent one. This is especially true for women, who are more likely than men to experience a heart attack without any chest pain at all. However, women are also more likely than men to experience other, less common symptoms, including jaw pain.

Heart attacks occur when oxygen-rich blood is unable to flow through the arteries and into the heart muscle. When this happens, a distress signal is sent to the spinal column through the nerves connected to the heart. Many nerves meet in the same location on the spine, including those coming from the jaw. As a result, when the signals from the heart reach the brain, sometimes the brain misinterprets the source of the original signal, and instead of alerting the body about the danger by sending pain signals to the heart, it sends the pain signals to the jaw instead.

If the jaw pain is constant, it may be due to a dental health issue. However, if it’s a symptom of a heart attack, the pain is more likely to be intermittent and increase with activity. If you experience jaw pain and there’s no other obvious cause, you should call 911 — even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack. A heart attack can begin to damage the heart within 30 minutes of the start of symptoms, and sometimes the damage is irreversible. Visit the Emory Women’s Heart Center website to learn about other atypical heart attack symptoms .

It can also help to know your personal risk level and what you can do to help prevent a heart attack. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment with an Emory Women’s Heart Center specialist today.

About Dr. Cutchins

Alexis Cutchins, MDAlexis Cutchins, MD is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her internship and residency in internal medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women, in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Price Lundberg, MD , provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

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Do All Heart Attacks Present With Chest Pain?

women heart painChest pain is the most common symptom of a heart attack in both men and women. However, it is important to understand that the exact nature of chest pain can be quite different in women and is often not the most prominent symptom of a heart attack.

Most of us probably think of a heart attack the way it is portrayed on television and in the movies: A sudden, dramatic occurrence that causes the victim to clutch his or her chest in agony. Women, however, may report chest pressure, discomfort, fullness or a burning sensation. In addition, they often experience pain in adjacent areas, such as the upper abdomen, upper back, neck, arms and jaw.

As a result of this variation of presenting symptoms, women who have complaints other than chest pain during a heart attack may be overlooked or not evaluated in a timely fashion. Women are more likely than men to have already sustained heart damage by the time they reach the emergency room. A heart attack can begin to cause damage within minutes of the start of symptoms, and sometimes this damage is irreversible. This is why it is critical that women and their loved ones learn to recognize the typical and atypical symptoms of a heart attack and seek emergency care immediately.

Screening is one way for women to determine their risk for heart disease. Through screening efforts, individuals can identify ways to reduce their risk of a heart attack and find out if they need to see a cardiologist for additional evaluation and testing. The Emory Women’s Heart Center offers comprehensive cardiac risk assessments for women who may be at risk for heart disease or want to learn more about what they can do to reduce this risk. As part of these comprehensive screenings, we review strategies to improve overall cardiovascular health and offer treatment options if appropriate.  Schedule your screening today!

Heart Disease Screening

About Dr. Isiadinso

Ijeoma Isiadinso, MDIjeoma Isiadinso, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York, majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as chief fellow during the final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.

Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools and universities and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

Dr. Isiadinso is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular diseases, nuclear cardiology, echocardiography and cardiovascular computed tomography. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Black Cardiologists, the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Preventive Cardiology and the American Public Health Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiac screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

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A Heart Attack May Look Different in Women

Heart Attack in WomenWhile the symptoms of a heart attack are often similar in men and women, women are more likely to experience “atypical” symptoms than men. That’s why it’s particularly important for women to be familiar with the full range of heart attack symptoms, including those that aren’t as common, but may be more common in women than men.

  • Chest Pain or Discomfort

This symptom isn’t always “painful.” It can also feel like squeezing, pressure, heaviness, tightness or fullness, and be anywhere from mild to severe.

  • Heaviness or Pain in Other Areas

These may include the back, neck, jaw or arms. This is more common in women. The pain or pressure can be gradual or sudden. It may come and go, gradually intensify or awaken one from sleep.

  • Cold Sweating

This can occur even without chest discomfort. If there is no obvious reason for sweating, such as exercise or hot flashes, consider having your physician investigate this further.

  • Fatigue

Some women may experience extreme exhaustion even during routine tasks, a gradual or sudden decrease in energy level, or an inability to complete tasks they were able to do in the past.

  • Nausea

Nausea can be a symptom of other problems, such as the flu, heartburn or stomach ulcers. However, nausea can also be a symptom of heart disease or angina.

  • Shortness of Breath

This can occur with minimal activity or with activities that previously did not cause breathing difficulty. This is especially important because people with diabetes experiencing a heart attack may not necessarily have chest pain, and this may be their only symptom.

  • Lightheadedness

This may occur with activity or in conjunction with any of the other symptoms.

In the case of a heart attack, no symptom should be taken lightly. If symptoms exist, call 911 as soon as they appear – even if you’re not sure it’s a heart attack. It could save your life. And remember, with heart attacks, TIME = MUSCLE: A heart attack can begin to damage the heart within 30 minutes of the start of symptoms, and sometimes the damage is irreversible.

About Dr. Lundberg

Gina Lundberg, MDGina Price Lundberg, MD, FACC , is the clinical director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center and a preventive cardiologist with Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

She is a national American Heart Association (AHA) spokesperson and was a board member for the Atlanta chapter from 2001 to 2007. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for the AHA’s North Fulton/Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009, she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is also a Circle of Red founding member and Cor Vitae member for the AHA.

She has been interviewed on the subject of heart disease in women by multiple media outlets, including CNN and USA Today. In 2007, Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the advisory board of the Georgia Department of Women’s Health, where she served until 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008, Atlanta Woman named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine.

Dr. Lundberg attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in internal medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). She completed her cardiology fellowship at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is board certified in cardiology and internal medicine and was recertified in both in 2002. Dr. Lundberg has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career. Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in the metro Atlanta area.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiac screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

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Patient Story – Can Stress Lead to a Heart Attack?

Stress & Heart Attack RiskEmory patient, Donna Fielding, a healthy looking 41 year old mother of two is sure that stress and her high-intensity type A personality lead to her heart attack at 37. Her heart attack taught Donna to “take a step back, take a deep breath, and make a decision.” She doesn’t let the “little things” in life ruin her days any longer.

Emory physicians are doing research to study the connection between stress and heart attack risk. According Emory physician, Dr. David Sheps, when you get stressed your heart rate and blood pressure go up.

View Donna’s story and learn about the research Emory is doing in a video from Fox 5 Atlanta, below:

Take control of your stress and potentially reduce your risk for heart disease!