Posts Tagged ‘HCM’

Cutting-Edge Therapies for Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common monogenetic cardiovascular disorder occurring in about 1 per 500 people in the general population. Approaches to the treatment of HCM vary considerably depending on how the patient is affected. At Emory Healthcare, we are fortunate to have true experts capable of providing state-of-art therapies which range from genetic counseling or simple life-style adjustments to cardiac transplantation. Patients at risk for sudden cardiac death receive life-saving cardiac defibrillators. Those with drug-refractory symptoms due to obstruction of outflow from the heart receive septal reduction either by open heart surgery or by catheter ablation. The Emory Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center is a regional and national center of excellence capable of addressing the full range of challenges in the patient with HCM.

For more information about programs that make up the Emory Heart & Vascular Center, visit emoryhealthcare.org/heart.

About John Douglas, MD

John Douglas, MDDr. John Douglas is an interventional cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center. He is also a Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and Director of the Interventional Cardiology Fellowship Program. He is one of the most tenured Emory cardiologists, beginning his career in 1974. He has been recognized in America’s Top Doctors, Atlanta’s Top Doctors and The Best Doctors in America.

Take-Aways from Cardiac Arrest Web Chat

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Young AthletesThank you for those who were able to participate in the Emory Heart & Vascular Live Chat on Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes. I was very impressed by many of your questions on the topic of cardiac arrest, and happy to be able to answer them. If you were not able to join me, you can view the Sudden Cardiac Arrest chat transcript here.

In the chat, we covered a variety of important topics pertaining to cardiac arrest symptoms, warning signs, and risk factors. All parents, coaches, and supporters of young athletes should be aware of these warning signs and know how to respond when they present themselves. There are a few key takeaways from last week’s chat that I would like to reiterate:

  1. Children and adults can survive sudden cardiac arrest if parents and others in the area act quickly.
  2. We encourage all coaches and parents learn CPR.
  3. In addition, we recommend obtaining an AED for all sports facilities. The equipment can be costly, but can save the life of a young athlete.

During the chat, there was also a question regarding what sports/activities were deemed too strenuous for those with heart disease. Please refer to the chart below that outlines the classification of competitive sports. The acceptable competive sports for those patients who have been diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most other types of heart disease are:

    • Billiards
    • Bowling
    • Cricket
    • Curling
    • Golf
    • Riflery

Please note that if you think you could be at risk for HCM you should visit your primary care physician for an evaluation. If the physician clears you or your child you do not need to limit activity based on the above chart.

If you have additional questions about sudden cardiac arrest in general, or cardiac arrest in young athletes, please use the comments section below. Please also feel free to use the comments section to let us know if you have other heart and vascular topics you would like to cover in future live chats!

Thanks again for a great chat!

Author: B. Robinson Williams, III, M.D.

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Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes

Cardiac arrest, once thought to be rare in young athletes, is becoming increasingly prevalent.  According to some experts, a high school student dies of cardiac arrest as often as every three days. A young person’s cardiac arrest could stem from a structural defect in the heart, or a problem with its electrical circuitry. But the most frequent cause of cardiac arrest among young athletes—making up nearly 40 percent of all cases— is the Hypertrophic Cadriomyopathy (HCM) which is a thickening of the heart muscle.

Fortunately, there are warning signs of both hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrest. To ensure good health during healthy competition among young athletes, parents and guardians need to be aware of the symptoms of both.

Join Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist and director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic, B. Robinson Williams III, MD  onThursday, August 9, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat on the topic of sudden cardiac arrest in young athletes. Dr. Williams will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about cardiac arrest in young athletes including causes, symptoms, and how to quickly treat, if it occurs.

You can register online for the live chat today!

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