Posts Tagged ‘emory women’s heart program’

Tasty, Heart Healthy Summer Breakfast recipe!

struedel1Grab some healthy summer fruits and mix up a heart healthy summer breakfast muffin that your family will love! This fat – free streusel muffin recipe is delicious and filling. Try it out to add some spice to your summer meals!

Fat – Free Streusel Muffins

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups all –purpose flour
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2/3 cup non-fat plain yogurt
  • 2/3 cup skim milk
  • ½ cup blueberries or diced apples

Streusel Topping:

  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon

Directions

In large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Gently stir in the yogurt and milk, blending just until dry ingredients are moistened. Fold in fruit. Fill lightly greased or paper-lined muffin cups ½ full with batter. Place 1 teaspoon of cinnamon-sugar mixture on top of each, and add batter to fill the cups ¾ full. Bake at 400 degrees for 18 minutes or until well browned. Serve warm.

*Makes 12 muffins

Nutritional Information

  • Calories – 138
  • Fat – > 1 gram
  • Cholesterol – < 1 milligram
  • Sodium – 230 milligrams

This heart healthy summer recipe will fill you up and give you the energy to attack all your fun summer activities!

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. Take the online heart disease risk assessment quiz to see if you are at risk for heart disease and if so, schedule your Cardiac Screening today to get individualed action plan for ensuring your heart is ready for the fun of summer! Call 404-778-7777 to learn more.

Heart Disease Screening

About Dr. Shirazi

Farheen Shirazi, MDFarheen Shirazi, MD is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at NYU, residency at Stanford University and fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health. Dr. Shirazi has published in the arena of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in Internal Medicine (2009) and Cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi will see patients at Emory at East Cobb – Heart & Vascular as well as Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road. She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

10 Tips for a Heart-Healthy Diet

Veggie Heart HealthyA healthy diet is one of the best ways to combat heart disease. And including healthier choices in your diet isn’t hard, since there are lots of delicious heart-healthy foods available, including whole grain breads, fruit, vegetables, fish, extra virgin olive oil, nuts and even chocolate. There are also some things you should avoid—or avoid too much of. Below are 10 tips to help you get on the path to a more heart-healthy diet.

  1. Eat Fish Regularly 
    Omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid, or EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA) that are found naturally in fish can provide numerous cardiovascular benefits, including reducing blood triglycerides, reducing blood clotting and regulating heart rhythms.
  2. Include Lycopene-Rich Foods in Your Diet
    Lycopene is a plant nutrient that has been associated with reducing the risk of heart disease. There is lots of lycopene in tomato products (particularly cooked ones), pink grapefruit and watermelon.
  3. Eat the Right Kinds of Fat
    Aim for a balance of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Research indicates that both types have benefits, including reducing the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in your blood. Try choosing extra virgin olive oil or canola oil instead of butter or margarine, and natural peanut butter rather than the kind with hydrogenated fat added. Also, almonds, cashews, pistachios and walnuts are good sources of healthy fat and make for easy snacks.
  4. Eat Plenty of Colorful Fruits and Vegetables
    In general, richly colored fruits and vegetables contain lots of helpful plant nutrients, and many have been shown to help protect against heart disease, among other health conditions.
  5. Include Plenty of Fiber in Your Diet
    A diet high in both soluble and insoluble fiber can help reduce the risk of heart disease. Soluble fiber, in particular, helps lower cholesterol levels. Good sources of soluble fiber include oats, oat bran, fruits (such as apples, pears, citrus fruits and berries), vegetables, (like carrots, cabbage and sweet potatoes) and legumes. Insoluble fiber is found in grain products like whole-grain breads, cereals and pastas.
  6. Eat Chocolate—in Moderation
    Milk chocolate, dark chocolate and bittersweet chocolate all contain a unique kind of saturated fat — stearic acid — that doesn’t raise blood cholesterol levels, and dark chocolate is also a good source of substances called antioxidants that are helpful in combating heart disease and other health problems. But chocolate also contains added sugars and caffeine , which should be consumed in limited portions (see below), so don’t eat too much.
  7. Try the DASH Eating Plan
    “DASH” stands for “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension.” The DASH diet is low in total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol, and rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy foods, whole grains, poultry, fish and nuts. In addition to helping with hypertension, the DASH diet may also help lower cholesterol. Learn more about the DASH Eating Plan.
  8. Reduce Salt
    Salt makes the body retain fluid, which can strain the heart. This can lead to increased blood pressure and added burden on your heart muscle. Try replacing added salt in your diet with fresh or dried herbs, lemon, onion or no-salt seasonings. Get ideas for other tasty salt substitutes.
  9. Limit Caffeine
    While there isn’t a consensus on the effects coffee can have on your heart, many experts recommend limiting caffeine intake to the equivalent of no more than three or four cups of coffee a day. But remember that other foods and drinks, such as tea, chocolate and many soft drinks, also contain caffeine and factor these into your daily total as well.
  10. Curb Added Sugars
    More than sugars found naturally in fruit and dairy products, added sugars are associated with elevated bad cholesterol and triglycerides and low good cholesterol, which increase the risk of heart disease.

If you are a woman who thinks you may be at a higher risk of developing heart disease, call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment with an Emory Women’s Heart Center specialist.

About Dr. Cutchins

Alexis Cutchins, MDAlexis Cutchins, MD is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her internship and residency in internal medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women, in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Price Lundberg, MD , provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Call 404-778-7777 to schedule a comprehensive cardiac screening and find out if you are at risk for heart disease.

Related Links

Looking for a Great Heart Healthy Recipe for Your Spring BBQ? We Can Help!

Red Bean SaladIt is spring time and that means it is time to get outside and enjoy the gorgeous weather! Enjoy this tasty heart healthy recipe provided by the Emory Women’s Heart Center to to add some variety to your spring/summer cookout.

Red Bean Salsa Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 – 15.5 ounce can red beans, rinsed and drained
  • ¼ cup chopped green onions
  • 1 large tomato, seeded and chopped
  • 1 serrano pepper, seeded and chopped
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro or parsley
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • Lime slices (optional)

In medium bowl, combine all ingredients and mix well. Cover and refrigerate at least one hour to blend flavors. Garnish with lime slices if desired.

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. Take the online heart disease risk assessment quiz to see if you are at risk for heart disease and if so, schedule your Cardiac Screening today to get individualed action plan for ensuring your heart is ready for the fun of summer! Call 404-778-7777 to learn more.

Heart Disease Screening

About Dr. Cutchins

Alexis Cutchins, MDDr. Alexis Cutchins has published several different articles on adipose tissue distribution and obesity in journals such as Circulation Research, Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Stroke and has a special interest in the effects of adipose tissue distribution on the heart.

Dr. Cutchins is board certified in Internal Medicine (2007) and Cardiovascular Diseases (2012). She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Cutchins sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Saint Joseph’s. She enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband, their three daughters and their dog. She loves to cook and ride horses.

Related Links

Emory Women’s Heart Center
Quiz – find out if you are at risk for heart disease
Eat Heart Healthy – Mediterranean Salmon Recipe via Dr. Cutchins
What is Congestive Heart Failure? Can I Prevent It?
Emory Healthcare Healthy Recipes Pinterest Board

Are You Looking to Get Your Heart and Diet into Shape for Summer Swim Season?

Apple HeartIf so, Emory Women’s Heart Center nurse practitioner, Christine Nell – Dybdahl NP-C, MPH, MSN, has some recommendations to help you shape up your heart for the summer and for life. Chris recommends patients follow the 2011 Heart Disease Prevention Guidelines for Women and follow a Mediterranean style heart healthy lifestyle habits. Chris notes that many of her female clients are unaware of the specific dietary intake recommendations for women.

Suggestions based on a 2000 calorie diet per day.

  • Load up on Fruits and vegetables!
  • Fruits and vegetables should visually take up half of your plate.
  • You should aim for at least 4 ½ cups a day of nonstarchy, fruits and vegetables.
  • When possible, make the veggie to fruit ratio be greater than two to one.
  • Examples of serving size are:

½ cup juice
1 small fruit
¼ cup dried no sugar added fruit
1 cup raw veggie
½ cup cooked veggie

Make sure to consume foods rich in omega 3 fatty acids!

  • We recommend women should consume (preferably fatty fish), at least two times a week.
  • Daily average intake of omega 3’s should be approximately 1,000 mg.
  • Examples of serving size is:

A single serving of fish is 3 ½ ounces, or about the size of a deck of cards.

  • One serving of salmon has between 1,000 to 1,800mg of omega 3 fatty acids.

Nuts, legumes, and seeds should be eaten at least four times a week.

  • Examples of servings size:

1 ½ ounces nuts (A combo of walnuts and almonds is great)
2 tablespoons natural peanut butter
½ cup legumes or beans
½ ounce of seeds

Eat your Fiber!

  • Fiber should be around 30 grams per day.
  • Consumer soluble fibers to help with lowering blood cholesterol.
  • Example:

One cup of cooked winter squash or pinto beans equals 4 grams of soluble fiber.

Don’t forget your whole grains!

  • Avoid refined grain products.
  • Consume approximately 3 whole grain servings per day.
  • Examples:

Two slices of whole wheat bread equals 2 grams of soluble fiber.
½ cup of brown rice

Limit sugar, alcohol, sodium, fat, and cholesterol intake.

  • Added sugars should be limited to six teaspoons or 24 grams per day.
  • Limit alcohol to no more than one serving per day.
  • Examples:

4 ounces of wine
12 ounce beer
1.5 ounce of 80-proof spirits

  • Limit sodium to fewer than 1,500mg daily.

Remember that a teaspoon is equal to about 2400mg/day.
Did you know that most of the sodium consumed in the American diet comes from breads?

  • Limit saturated fat to fewer than 7% of your total energy intake.

This is estimated to be less than 15 grams per day.
This should be lowered to 5% if you have high blood cholesterol.

  • Limit cholesterol intake to under 150mg/day.

The average egg yolk has about 180mg of cholesterol.

  • Avoid trans-fatty acids.

Avoid any foods that have the ingredient “hydrogenated”.

Make time during the busy summer season to exercise! In addition to these heart healthy dietary recommendations, be sure to accumulate 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. This can be accomplished in at least 10 minute increments such as with brisk walking during a break at work.

For weight loss, this recommendation should be increased to 60-90 minutes per day. Additionally, for weight loss, many women should consider reducing their calorie intake to about 1,200-1,500 calories per day. It is also helpful to do at least 2 days per week of muscle strengthening activities.

Take the heart disease risk assessment quiz to determine if you are at risk for heart disease!

To get a full assessment of your heart health, schedule your heart screening today:

Heart Disease Screening

References

  • Mosca, et al. AHA Guidelines for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Women. JACC 2011:57; 1404-1423.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Christine Nell – Dybdahl, NP – C, MPH, MSN has been a registered nurse since 1994 and a nurse practitioner since 1998. She brings to the practice over 20 years of cardiology experience. She is the clinical nurse director for Emory’s Center for Heart Disease Prevention and is active with the Emory’s Women’s Heart Program. She received her BSN from Kent State University and her dual
master degrees from Emory University in nursing (board certified family nurse practitioner) and public health (health education and promotion). Her interests include cardiovascular disease prevention, heart healthy life style changes, cholesterol abnormalities, women’s heart care, and family-involved chronic heart disease management. Chris is a member of the American College of Cardiology, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners. She makes it a priority to connect interested patients and researchers at Emory. She is the founder and clinical leader of the Women Living with Angina Support Group. She has co-authored several journal articles and has spoken at many conferences on a wide variety of topics

Related Links

Emory Women’s Heart Center
Quiz – Are you at risk for heart disease?
Top Symptoms of Heart Attacks in Women
Eat Heart Healthy – Mediterranean Salmon Recipe via Dr. Cutchins

Wake up your Taste Buds with this Fun, Summer Heart Healthy Chicken Recipe!

Fruity Chicken RecipeDo you think that you can’t have healthy and tasty in the same meal? Well, think again, this grilled chicken recipe provides tons of heart healthy benefits and also tastes amazing! Try it out at your next summer cookout!

Grilled Chicken with Warm Fruit Salsa

Ingredients

  • 3 kiwi fruits
  • 1 cup strawberries, halved
  • 1 cup cantaloupe melon, cubed
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons chopped shallots
  • 2 tablespoons raspberry vinegar
  • 2 teaspoon coarse black pepper
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts
  • Hot cooked rice (optional)

Preparation Information
Peel kiwi fruit and cut into π – inch thick slices. Cut slices in half to form half circles. Toss kiwi fruit rounds with strawberries, melon cubes, and tarragon in bowl. Heat olive oil in small saucepan. Stir in shallots and sauté until soft, but not brown. Stir in vinegar and pepper, and heat until mixture boils. Drizzle hot dressing over fruit, tossing gently to mix well. Set fruit aside to marinate for one to two hours. Grill or broil chicken breasts until cooked through. Spoon fruit salsa over chicken just before serving over rice.

Nutritional Information
Yield – 4 Servings
1 chicken breast with 2/3 cup fruit
Calories: 225
Fat: 6 grams
Cholesterol: 68 milligrams
Sodium: 82 milligrams

Spring time is also the perfect time to get your heart checked in time for summer! Schedule your heart screening today with an Emory Women’s Heart Center cardiologist

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

About Susmita Parashar, MD, MPH, MS

Susmita Parashar, MDSusmita Parashar, MD, MPH, MS is a Board certified cardiologist at the Emory Heart and Vascular Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine. Prior to joining as faculty in the Division of Cardiology, Dr Parashar was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Medicine at Emory for 8 years. She applies her experience as a Board certified internist in providing a holistic care to patients. She was awarded the American Heart Association (AHA) Trudy Bush Fellowship for Cardiovascular Research in Women’s Health Award to recognize outstanding work in the area of women’s health and cardiovascular disease and Emory Department of Medicine Early Career Faculty Research Award for Clinical Research.

Dr. Parashar completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Medical College of Georgia, Augusta and Cardiology fellowship at Emory University. She completed her Master of Public Health and a Master of Science from Emory in 2005. A passionate clinician-researcher and educator, she trains medical students, residents and cardiology fellows. In addition, she conducts clinical research. Dr Parashar’s clinical and research focus is in preventive cardiology with a focus on women and cardiovascular diseases.

She has received several grants and awards from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the AHA to conduct research on women and heart disease. She has served as Emory principal investigator for large NIH funded clinical research for heart attack patients. She was also invited to participate as a co-investigator for the NIH funded Cardiovascular Health Study for older adults. She has presented her work in national and international scientific meetings, including the AHA Annual Session, AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke, American College of Cardiology Annual Session, Society of General Internal Medicine and International Congress of Coronary Heart Disease.

Dr. Parashar has authored/coauthored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, including invited textbook chapters, manuscripts, abstracts and review articles. Her work has been published in such prestigious journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine and Circulation, and highlighted by the Nature and national media such as CNN, CBS and NPR news.

She believes in family-career balance and applies her experience as a mother of two young children and wife to her work.

Related Resources

Emory Healthcare Recipes for Wellness
Emory Healthcare Healthy Recipes on Pinterest

Want a Heart Healthy Summer Dessert Recipe?

Raw Brownie RecipeThank you all for submitting recipes into the Emory Women’s Heart Center recipe contest! After consulting an Emory Healthcare nutritionist, we have selected LaVelle Johnson’s submission for the “OMG, It Can’t Be A Raw Brownie” Recipe as our favorite! LaVelle’s recipe was taken from the website PreventDisease.com. This recipe is amazing, but what is even more amazing about this delicious dessert – it’s heart healthy! Try out this new, fabulous brownie recipe to make a scrumptious dessert for your mother this Mother’s Day, and check out all of our great heart healthy recipes on our Pinterest page!

Brownie Base Ingredients

  • 1 cup Walnuts
  • 1 cup Medjool dates, pitted
  • ½ cup Raw Cocoa Powder
  • 1 Avocado

Icing Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp Raw Honey
  • 1 Tbsp Maple Syrup
  • 3 Tbsp Cocoa Powder
  • 2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • Dash sea salt
  • Dash cinnamon

Directions

  1. Combine walnuts, dates, and the 1/3 cup of cocoa powder in a food processor (or high-end blender) and pulse mixture until it looks like potting soil. Pat this into an 20cm x 20cm (8inch x 8inch) pan.
  2. With a food processor (or high-end blender) blend the avocado, honey, maple syrup, second lot of cocoa, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon until smooth.
  3. Spread the icing over the brownie base, then put in the freezer for about an hour to set. No matter how long the brownies stay in the freezer, they never become rock-hard mostly because they won’t last that long.
  4. Enjoy!

*Original image and adapted recipe from wayfaringchocolate.com

Eating healthy can help prevent heart disease. So why not, eat your favorite foods with different healthy twist and try it out! Remember to schedule your heart screening today!

Heart Disease Screening

About Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Related Links

Are You a Female Emory Patient Who Beat Heart Disease?

Share Your StoryIf so, please share your story with us! We would like to use patient stories to help educate other women on how they can prevent, reverse or beat heart disease. Many women still are not aware that heart disease is the number one killer of women, it causes more deaths than all forms of cancer combined, but in many cases it is preventable. You can contribute your story by visiting http://www.emoryhealthcare.org/heart-disease-women/share-your-story.html.

Take action – share your story. You may help save a life!

About Gina Lundberg, MD

Gina Lundberg, MDGina Price Lundberg, MD FACC is the Clinical Director of the Emory Women’s Heart center. She was the founder and Medical Director of the Saint Joseph’s Heart Center for Women established in 2007. She is a Preventive Cardiologist with Emory Clinic in East Cobb and has practiced at Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital since 1998. She joined the Emory University faculty after the Emory and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital merger in 2012. She serves on the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee and is a National American Heart Association (AHA) Spokesperson.

Related Links

How the “Superwoman” Syndrome Impacts Heart Health

superwoman4Are you a woman who tries to do it all? Many women are busier than ever these days juggling their careers, families, children, household duties, social lives and other obligations. When we can’t do it all, many of us feel guilty that we are unable to achieve perfection and balance in our lives. At the times we are most stressed, many of us make unhealthy choices, such as leaving exercise out of our daily routine, eating unhealthy foods and not getting enough rest. Unfortunately, this “superwoman” syndrome can lead to higher blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, higher cholesterol, cancer and importantly, heart disease, which is the number one killer of women in this country.

Heart disease may be prevented and is potentially reversible in many cases, so it’s important to learn how to make the best choices for our future health.

1. Realize that it is ok to not be perfect all the time. You are not alone — ask any other woman, and most likely you will learn that she is experiencing some of the same struggles as you. When you can’t be perfect, learn to laugh through the chaos.

2. Learn stress-relieving techniques. Determine the avenue for stress relief that works best for you. For some people it is going out for a run or scheduling a girls’ night, while others may prefer some time alone. Determine which activities make you happiest and make sure to work some of these into your schedule.

3. Eat healthy foods. Food choices can dramatically impact the way you feel. Make sure to balance protein, carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, and good fats in each meal so that your body has the energy it needs to make it through the toughest days.

4. Rest. Make sure to get six to eight hours of rest each night. Although it may be hard to pack this much rest into the day with your hectic schedule, try to rest as much as possible so you are alert and more productive. When you are rested, you can accomplish more, and you feel better overall.

5. Exercise. Try to work exercise into your daily routine. Exercise has been proven to increase energy levels, lower stress and improve mood. If you don’t have time to go out for a morning run, walk up stairs, park at the back of the parking lot, do squats at your desk while on a teleconference or lift hand weights while you are waiting for your child to get ready for school.

All of the recommendations above do not have to be completed at once — at first, try taking small steps toward improving your health. If you have a high-stress lifestyle and think you may be at risk for heart disease, schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening at the Emory Women’s Heart Center. Emory Women’s Heart Center nurse practitioners may be able to help you craft a plan to help you reduce stress and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

screening-bar

Farheen Shirazi, MDAbout Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Links

Quiz: Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?

Stress & Heart Disease Chat With Dr. Parashar

Keep Your Heart Healthy – Get Active!

Signs That You May Need a Cardiovascular Screening

Make a Healthy Nutrition New Year’s Resolution You Will Keep All Year Long!

Emory Welcomes 3 New Female Cardiologists to the Women’s Heart Program!

Dr. Brown, Dr. Cutchins, Dr. Shirazi

Emory Women’s Heart Program utilizes a women-focused, comprehensive process to assess cardiovascular risk factors and diagnose and treat heart disease. Our goal is to help women prevent heart disease and improve cardiovascular outcomes through the highest quality patient- and family-centered care, research and education.

The Emory Heart & Vascular Center is excited to welcome three new female cardiologists to the Women’s Heart Program team! Jennifer Brown, MD, Alexis Cutchins, MD, and Farheen Shirazi, MD, (pictured left to right) will provide general and preventive cardiology services with a special emphasis on women with heart disease.

Dr. Brown received her cardiology training at the University of Maryland Medical Center. In addition to the specialties listed above, she has a particular interest in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure in women being treated for breast cancer. Dr. Brown will practice at the following locations:

Eastside

Clifton Road

Rockdale

1608 Tree Lane, Suite 101
Snellville, GA 30078
404-778-8360

1365 Clifton Road, NE, Building A, 2nd Floor
Atlanta, GA 30322
404-778-5299

1400 Wellbrook Circle
Conyers, GA 30012
404-778-8150

Dr. Shirazi recently completed her cardiology fellowship at Emory University and will practice at the following locations:

Johns Creek

Cumming

6335 West Johns Crossing
Physician Plaza, Suite 110
Johns Creek, GA 30097
404 -778-8240

1200 Bald Ridge Marina Road, Suite 150
Cumming, GA 30041
770-886-0003

Dr. Cutchins recently completed her cardiology fellowship at the University of Virginia Medical Center and will practice at the following locations:

Perimeter

Midtown

875 Johnson Ferry Road
Atlanta, GA 30342
404-778-6070

550 Peachtree Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30308
404-686-7878

The Program staff has extensive experience regarding the unique aspects of heart disease in women. Our multi-disciplinary team includes female and male cardiologists, female nurse practitioners, nurses, nutritionists and exercise physiologists, as well as a full-range of specialists. We provide counseling on weight loss, exercise programs, diet and other lifestyle changes to help treat and reduce the risk of heart disease in women. In addition, we can help women understand how stress, obesity, depression and menopause may impact their heart health.

To refer a patient to one of Emory’s new female cardiologists, please call the number associated with the clinic listed above that is most convenient for your patient. To learn more about all of our locations, please call the Emory Physician Consult Line at 404-778-5050.