Posts Tagged ‘emory women’s heart center’

Heart Disease and Emory Women’s Heart Center

According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one killer of women and is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. It is also preventable. The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a program dedicated to the screening, prevention and treatment of heart disease in women.

The number of women at risk is startling. “Believe it or not, a very small percentage of women fall into the low risk category for heart disease, and those people are mostly in their twenties,” says Stacy Jaskwhich, a nurse practitioner at Emory’s Johns Creek’s Women’s Heart Center. “When you consider family history, age, diet, activity levels and other existing conditions such as diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, most women are at some level of risk.”

“Most heart disease is preventable, so we want to reach these women, ideally between the ages of 40-60, to evaluate their individual risks and educate them on risk reduction. Starting treatment early, when it’s necessary, will help save lives,” says Gina Lundberg, MD, clinical director of Emory Women’s Heart Center and assistant professor of medicine, Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Lundberg founded Georgia’s first women’s cardiac prevention program in 1998. She also launched the Emory Saint Joseph’s Heart Center for Women in 2007.

The Emory Women’s Heart Center offers comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and education for women at risk for heart disease. If necessary, the Center can also assist with referrals. Screenings are beneficial to those who have a family history of heart disease or risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, smoking, and/or diabetes. The initial two hour screening includes a review of family history of heart disease and a comprehensive global risk assessment that includes age, blood pressure, total cholesterol level, HDL level, blood glucose, smoking history, pregnancy history, hypertension history, and individualized education based on your risk factors. Screenings can be self-referred and start at $75. Gift certificates are also available to purchase for loved ones.

Women often experience symptoms that are different than those experienced from men. For example, women may not experience chest pain. Because of this, women must understand that heart attack symptoms may be similar to those of panic disorders, muscle strain, indigestion or influenza.

Rapid intervention is most effective in beginning stages of a heart attack. Damage to heart muscle starts within 30 minutes of the onset of symptoms, and according to the Society of Chest Pain Centers (SCPC), 85% of heart damage occurs within the first two hours – sometimes irreversible. Call 911 as soon as the first symptoms of a heart attack appear.

Symptoms of a Heart Attack

  • Chest pain or discomfort: It may feel like a squeezing, pressure, heaviness, tightness or fullness.
  • Heaviness or pain in areas other than the chest: This symptom is more common in women. The pain or pressure can be gradual or sudden. It may come and go, gradually intensify, or awaken one from sleep. Areas that are common include the back, neck, jaw or arms.
  • Cold sweats: This symptom can occur without chest discomfort. If there is no obvious reason for sweating, such as exercise or hot flashes, consider contact your physician.
  • Fatigue: Some women may experience an inability to complete routine tasks. This can be due to extreme tiredness or a decrease in energy level.
  • Nausea: This can be mistaken for other problems, such as influenza, heartburn, or stomach ulcers.
  • Shortness of breath: This can occur with minimal activity or with activities that previously did not cause difficulty with breathing. This is especially important for people with diabetes, as they are less likely to experience chest pain.
  • Lightheadedness: This symptom may occur with activity or in conjunction with any of the other symptoms.

 

Women & Heart Disease Live Chat – February 14th

womens-heart260x200Heart disease is now the #1 killer in women. The good news is, most heart disease is preventable — and early detection saves lives. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart. When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a collaborative group of providers that treats patients using a team approach. They are dedicated to screening, diagnosing, treating and preventing heart disease in Atlanta’s women. The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.

Join Emory Women’s Heart Center physician, Alexis Cutchins, MD, on Tuesday, February 14 at 12pm EST for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions regarding topics such as: challenges women face specific to heart disease, heart disease prevention, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women. Sign up for this live chat below!

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Emory Women’s Heart Center Wear Red Events

womensheartwearredHeart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States, but in many cases it’s preventable. That’s why Emory Healthcare would like to invite you to join us at one of our women’s heart health events in celebration and recognition of Heart Month in February, as well as Mother’s Day in May.

During these fun, educational events, participants will have an opportunity to meet Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians and staff and learn about how to prevent, detect and treat heart disease. You will also have the opportunity to purchase products and services from our vendors who will be on hand providing consultations, displaying jewelry, sharing healthy foods, etc.

To learn more, please call Emory HealthConnection℠ at 404-778-7777. The events are free! Parking will be available in hospitals’ main parking lots.

Emory Women’s Heart Center Wear Red Event Details

Friday, February 5, 2016
Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital
Doctors Building Atrium
7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Friday, February 19, 2016
Emory University Hospital
Hospital Auditorium
Open House from
7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Friday, May 6, 2016
Emory University Hospital Midtown
Medical Office Tower Atrium
Open House from
7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

View more Wear Red Event information here

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Women & Heart Disease Live Chat- February 23, 2016

women-hrt-disease260x200Heart disease kills 6 times more women than breast cancer each year, making it the number one killer of women.

Many people consider heart disease to be a predominantly male-oriented condition. However, heart disease is the number one killer in women and affects one out of every three in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart. When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is dedicated to screening, diagnosing, treating and preventing heart disease in Atlanta’s women. We’re thankful the awareness about heart disease, and the unique challenges faced by women, continues to be on the rise. The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.

How can you educate yourself? Join Emory Women’s Heart Center physician, M. Carolina C Gongora, M.D., on Tuesday, February 23 at 12pm EST for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions such as: unique challenges women face specific to heart disease, what women can do to prevent heart disease, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women. Register for this live chat.

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Reward Your Heart 2015

October 1, 2015, 6:00 – 8:30 p.m. By Emory Women’s Heart Centerrewardyourheartevent

The Emory Women’s Heart Center will be hosting the third annual Reward Your Heart Event.
Enjoy a relaxing evening filled with heart-healthy information and indulgences including delicious tasting of wines and hors d’oeuvres, specialty olive oils, soothing teas, aromatherapy and hand massages. Plus door prizes will be available.

Learn about “The Benefits of Changing Health Care” from Jennifer Mieres, MD, an award-winning professor of cardiology who is internationally recognized as a leading advocate for women’s heart health, heart disease prevention, wellness and diversity in health care.

The evening will include informal consultations with physicians from Emory Healthcare and a panel discussion and Q & A with the Emory Women’s Heart Team

Reward Your Heart Event Details

WHEN:

Thursday, October 1, 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

WHERE:

Hyatt Atlanta Perimeter at Villa Christina
4000 Summit Blvd, NE
Atlanta, GA 30319

TICKETS:

Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. Register online at
https://www.regonline.com/rewardyourheart2015 or call 678-843-8368

MORE INFO:

For more information about the Reward Your Heart event, call 678-843-5863, or visit emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart

The Mediterranean Diet

Mediterranean salmon saladBy now, you’ve likely heard about the Mediterranean Diet. You may have heard it’s good for you, can help you manage your weight and even allows you to enjoy some red wine. But is it true? Can you really enjoy yummy foods and still look and feel great? The answer is – ABSOLUTELY!

The Mediterranean diet is a lifestyle change that helps decrease your risk of cardiovascular events in the future. Research has shown that people who incorporate plenty of produce, fish, whole grains and healthy fats not only weigh less, but also have a decreased risk for heart disease, depression, and dementia.

Because the Mediterranean diet should be a lifestyle choice, it involves the daily consumption of a variety of fruit, vegetables, vegetarian proteins (beans, nuts, legumes), moderate amounts of whole grains (whole wheat breads and pasta, brown rice) and small amounts of red meat. It is important to avoid processed and pre-packaged foods and meals, as they may provide excess fat, sodium and preservatives.

Here is an easy recipe I enjoy making for my family. The leftovers are great for lunch the next day! Feel free to add olives, peppers or any other vegetables of your choosing!

SALMON NICOISE SALAD

Ingredients

Marinade

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • Juice from one lemon
  • 1.5 tablespoons Dijon Mustard
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • pinch of kosher salt
  • ground pepper

Vinaigrette
Wisk the following ingredients together:

  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons cider or red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • pinch of salt
  • pepper to taste

Salad

  • Salmon filets (I use ¾ pounds for 3 -4 servings but make a pound if I want more leftovers)
  • ¾ lb fingerling potatoes, boiled
  • large handful green beans, steamed
  • 4 eggs – hard boiled and cut into quarters
  • baby spring mix

Directions

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  • Marinate the salmon for 10-30 minutes.
  • Bake the salmon for 20 minutes (or until desired doneness) on a foil lined pan with marinade poured over the top. The salmon should be cooked through so it can be flaked apart into the salad.
  • Assemble the salad with the baby spring mix on the bottom and the eggs (quartered), green beans, potatoes and flaked salmon on top.

You can dress the entire salad with the vinaigrette or serve the salad and dress after. I reserve portions of spring mix, potatoes, egg, green beans and salmon to assemble in a Tupperware when cool for lunch the next day, and reserve a portion of the vinaigrette in a separate container.

Check out our other heart-healthy recipe ideas!

To discuss your risk factors for heart disease and to learn more ways to help prevent heart disease, please schedule an appointment with the Emory Women’s Heart Center by clicking here or calling HealthConnection at 404-778-7777.

About Dr. Cutchins

Alexis Cutchins, MDAlexis Cutchins, MD is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

Dr. Cutchins has published several different articles on adipose tissue distribution and obesity in journals such as Circulation Research, Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Stroke and has a special interest in the effects of adipose tissue distribution on the heart.

Dr. Cutchins is board certified in Internal Medicine (2007) and Cardiovascular Diseases (2012). She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Cutchins sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Saint Joseph’s.

She enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband, their three daughters and their dog. She loves to cook and ride horses.

Why is Screening for Heart Disease Important?

Cardiovascular ScreeningDid you know that Emory Healthcare offers preventive health and wellness screenings throughout the metro Atlanta area? Our goal is to improve the health of our patients and provide communities greater access to important screening services, as well as the Emory Healthcare Network of physicians and providers.

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to the diagnosis, screening, treatment and prevention of heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned women’s heart specialist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive heart screenings for patients at risk for cardiovascular disease as well as a full range of treatment options for those already diagnosed with heart disease.

Why is heart disease screening important?

Screenings are often the best way to identify risk factors that may contribute to heart disease. According to the American Heart Association (AHA), few people have “ideal risk levels on all screening tests. However, if you do have test results that are less than ideal, it doesn’t mean you’re destined to develop a serious cardiovascular disease. On the contrary, it means you’re in position to begin changing your health in a positive way.”

What does a heart disease screening entail?

Emory Women’s Heart Center offers three screening options which are based on the patient’s needs:

Plan A: ($75) Initial Assessment for All Women
Your initial screening includes a review for any family history of cardiovascular disease and a comprehensive global cardiac risk assessment that includes your age, blood pressure, total cholesterol level, HDL level, smoking history and hypertension history. You will also work directly with a nurse practitioner to develop an individualized plan that helps you reduce your identifed risk factors.

Our comprehensive examination includes:

  •  Body mass index
  • Blood pressure
  • Cholesterol evaluation
  • Depression scale assessment
  • Fasting blood sugar test
  • Exercise recommendations
  • Physical exam
  • Pregnancy history
  • Sleep evaluation
  • Waist circumference
  • Weight consultation

Plan B: ($100) Women with Intermediate Risk, Hypertension or Diabetes Mellitus

  • Ankle brachial index (ABI) – Screening for circulation abnormalities in the lower extremities
  • Echocardiogram – Test to evaluate the structural aspects of the heart
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG) – Test to evaluate the electrical conduction of the heart
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) – Blood test to determine diabetes risk
  • Microalbuminuria – Urine test to screen for early kidney disease

Plan C: ($100) Women with Intermediate Risk or Diabetes Mellitus

  • Calcium score – Computed tomography (CT) of the coronary arteries to help determine risk for coronary disease or blockage

The AHA recommends that cardiovascular screening start at age 20. Use your screening as an opportunity to take charge of your health, modify unhealthy behaviors and have a positive impact on your life. To request an appointment with the Emory Women’s Heart Center, please call 404-778-7777 or click here.

Go Red for Your Heart

Go Red AtlantaHeart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States, but in many cases it’s preventable. That’s why Emory Healthcare would like to invite you to join us at one of our women’s heart health events in celebration and recognition of Heart Month in February, as well as Mother’s Day in May.

During these fun, educational events, participants will have an opportunity to meet Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians and staff and learn about how to prevent, detect and treat heart disease. You will also have the opportunity to purchase products and services from our vendors who will be on hand providing consultations, displaying jewelry, sharing healthy foods, etc.

To learn more, please call Emory HealthConnection℠ at 404-778-7777. The events are free! Parking will be available in hospitals’ main parking lots.

Go Red Event Details

When: Friday, February 6, 2015, 7:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Where: Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Doctors Building Atrium

When: Friday, February 20, 2015, 7:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Where: Emory University Hospital, Hospital Auditorium

When: Friday, May 8, 2015, 7:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Where: Emory University Hospital Midtown, Medical Office Tower Atrium

Take action to prevent heart disease by attending a women’s heart health event and don’t forget to WEAR RED!

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Healthy Gift Ideas for Everyone on Your List!

Need some help checking everyone off your holiday shopping list? We’ve got a some great ideas to keep you and the people you love healthy this holiday season and in the New Year!

Massage – Who doesn’t love a good massage? Man or woman, we can all benefit from a decreased risk of heart disease by reducing our stress levels.

Gym bag – For the person in your life that is always at the gym, or for someone who needs new swag to motivate them to get to the gym.

Yoga – For the friend that could benefit from flexibility, surprise him or her with a yoga mat or a session at their local yoga studio.

Exercise tracker – From the FitBit to the Up Move, tech gadgets make working out more fun than ever. Increasing steps and decreasing calorie intake will lead to a leaner, healthier friend or family member.

Blender – Your mom or wife will love you for getting her a fancy new blender! The best part? She’ll be able to whip up some amazing smoothies for breakfast to help curb her appetite throughout the day.

Bike – Know someone who might enjoy biking to work or school? A bike is a great way to get the people you love moving.

Sneakers – Everyone could benefit from a new pair of running or hiking shoes. Plan a fun trek to the top of Stone Mountain or a jog around Piedmont Park.

Sports bra – You may not believe the difference a proper fitting sports bra will make! With the appropriate amount of support, your friend or sister could work out longer and harder.

Knife set – Guys like sharp objects, and getting a new knife set is as equally exciting as getting a new tool set, expect the knife set can help him create those delicious sweet potato chips you love to snack on!

Emory Women’s Heart Center Screening – Did you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death among women? Show the women in your life just how much you care about them by scheduling a screening at the Emory Women’s Heart Center. She’ll get two hours of undivided attention to help her understand her risk of heart disease.

To learn more about the Emory Women’s Heart Center
or to make an appointment, call 404-778-7777.

Happy holidays from Emory Healthcare!

Cardiology Experts Near You

Women's Heart ScreeningsEmory Women’s Heart Center (EWHC) is a unique program dedicated to the diagnosis, screening, treatment and prevention of heart disease in women. The Center provides comprehensive heart screenings for patients at risk for cardiovascular disease as well as a full range of treatment options for those already diagnosed with heart disease. According to the NIH, heart disease kills 1 in 4 women. Fortunately, many women can take preventive measures to minimize their risk of a cardiovascular event by controlling their risk factors.

Risk factors for cardiovascular disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity or physical inactivity, family history of premature heart disease, high cholesterol, menopause, mental stress and certain pregnancy-related conditions (eclampsia, preeclampsia or gestational diabetes) or autoimmune diseases (lupus or rheumatoid arthritis).

At our Lithonia office, we have both Family Practice and Cardiology providers to offer the following services:

  • Annual health & wellness evaluations for your entire family
  • Heart screenings for women who could be at risk for heart disease, but have not been diagnosed with heart disease
  • Diagnostic cardiac care for women who are currently experiencing symptoms of heart disease
  • Health counseling and advice to empower women to take steps to prevent heart disease
  • Long-term management of chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, depression or heart disease
  • Preoperative cardiac evaluation
  • Routine immunizations: influenza, tetanus, pneumovax, etc.
  • Referrals to Emory specialists as needed

To make an appointment with the Emory Women’s Heart Center, please call 404-778-7777 to speak to an Emory HealthConnection nurse. View other convenient Emory Women’s Heart Center locations.

Please note: Comprehensive heart screenings are for patients who are at risk for heart disease but are not having symptoms and have not been diagnosed with heart disease.

Physician Spotlight

Ijeoma Isiadinso, MD Ijeoma Isiadinso, MD is Director at Emory Women’s Heart Center at Lithonia. This location is particularly convenient for patients and their families because it provides patients with access to both cardiologists and general medicine specialists.

Dr. Isiadinso is passionate about preventing heart disease in women and has clinical interests in cardiovascular disease prevention, preoperative evaluation, cardiovascular risk reduction, coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia, counseling on lifestyle changes for patients at risk, or with, family history of heart disease. . Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.

Dr. Isiadinso is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular diseases, nuclear cardiology, echocardiography and cardiovascular computed tomography. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Black Cardiologists, the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Preventive Cardiology and the American Public Health Association.