Posts Tagged ‘doctor chat’

Takeaways from Dr. Lundberg’s Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating Chat

heart health holiday eatingThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, December 9, for our live online chat on “Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating,” hosted by the Clinical Director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center, Gina Lundberg, MD.

With holiday parties in full swing, many of us are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Dr. Lundberg discussed heart-healthy tips and recipes, as well as answered your questions on how to make smart food and drink decisions.

See all of Dr. Lundberg’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What are some entrée or side substitutions I can make without losing the “holiday” touch?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: Turkey and ham are both lean meat, so entrees aren’t usually the problem The side dishes are usually where we run into trouble. Feel free to have your ham, turkey, and even lean pork and beef, but try to avoid the potato-heavy, cheesy side dishes.

 

Question: I crave sweets every day. What can I do to satisfy my cravings without reaching for the chocolate?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: The more sugar you eat, the more you crave sugar. If you stick to a diet that is higher in protein, you’ll be more satisfied and won’t crave sugar as much. Eating healthier snacks more frequently (fruit, veggies, raw nuts) will stop you from being hungry and eating the wrong things.

 

BONUS: Dr. Lundberg’s Top 10 Tips to Stay Healthy During the Holidays

holiday-health-tips

If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript. If you have additional questions for Dr. Lundberg, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

Heart Disease is the Number One Killer of Women – Take Action Now to Avoid Being a Statistic!

Many people consider heart disease to be a predominantly male-oriented condition. However, heart disease is the number one killer in women and affects one out of every three in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart.  When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

“The scary thing is that heart attacks in females are more likely to be fatal than in men,” explains Farheen Shirazi, Cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Johns Creek. “Far too often, women ignore the warning signs of a heart attack and do not seek immediate medical attention. As time elapses, the muscles of the heart weaken, causing severe or life-threatening damage.”

Thankfully the awareness about heart disease continues to be on the rise. “The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.”

How can you educate yourself? Join Dr. Shirazi on Tuesday, April 9 for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions such as: what women can do to prevent heart disease, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women.


 About Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Farheen Shirazi, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center.  She specializes in preventive cardiology and heart disease in women.  Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine, her Internship at New York University School of Medicine, her residency at Stanford Hospital and her Fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Shirazi has been practicing at Emory since 2012 and primarily sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Cumming She is passionate about educating women about how to prevent heart disease.

Related Links

Heart Disease in Young Women

Young Women Heart Disease Web ChatDid you know that heart disease is the number one killer of women? And, what is more alarming is that heart disease affects women of all ages, not just older women. It is very important to know that younger women are more likely to fail to recognize their risk. According to researchers at the American Heart Association, about 16,000 women under age 55 die of heart disease each year, which is close to the same number of women of the same age who die of breast cancer. So, women of all ages should listen up: learn the symptoms of a heart attack so you are not one of the statistics!

If you are young women and have a history of heart disease in your family, have risk factors that could lead to heart disease or are concerned about your chances of developing heart disease, join us on Tuesday, May 15, 2012, at 12:30 p.m. EST for a live chat on Heart Disease in Young Women.

Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist Susmita Parashar, MD, will answer questions about heart disease in young women including:

  • Why it is crucial for women to know the symptoms of heart disease in women
  • What young women can do to prevent heart disease
  • The importance of getting treatment right away
  • The research underway to combat heart disease in women

To register, visit Emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

Is Your High Blood Pressure Out of Control?

High Blood Pressure Web ChatDo you have uncontrolled hypertension (high blood pressure) and need another option for your care?

If so, the Emory Heart & Vascular Center is now enrolling patients in a study for this condition. Called the Symplicity HTN – 3 Study, this clinical research study will test the safety and effectiveness of a procedure called renal denervation using the Symplicty Catheter System as a treatment for uncontrolled hypertension. You may be eligible to participate in the research if you are between the ages of 18 and 80, you have an average systolic blood pressure (SBP) > to 160mmHg and you are taking three or more antihypertensive medications. Chandan Devireddy, MD, FACC, FSCAI is the principle investigator in the trial at Emory.

For more information about the clinical trial, please contact Emory HealthConnection 404-778-7777.

CAUTION: Investigational device. Limited by Federal (United States) law to investigational use.

If you have high blood pressure and want to learn more about what you can do to manage it, join us tomorrow at 12:30 p.m. for a chat on hypertension with Dr. Susmita Parashar. Visit Emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats to register and see a complete listing of Emory Healthcare’s live chats.

High Blood Pressure Related Resources:

Let’s Keep the Heart Disease Prevention Momentum Going!

Thanks to those who joined me Wednesday for our live chat on Women and Heart Disease. We discussed a lot of different topics related to women and heart disease and had some great questions! If you were unable to join us, check out the transcript of the chat!

If you are a woman with heart disease and want to schedule an evaluation call 404-778-2746. The Emory Women’s Heart Program sees patients on Thursdays and Fridays at The Emory Clinic on Clifton Road. Emory Women’s Heart Program provides cardiac risk assessment, diagnosis and heart disease care through a women-focused approach to cardiovascular care. Our goal is to help women prevent heart disease and improve cardiovascular outcomes through the highest quality patient and family-centered care, research and education.

During the chat, we talked a bit about the upcoming 2011 Metro Atlanta Heart Walk. If you’re interested in participating, but don’t have a team, you can join ours! I will be there with my colleagues and we will have physicians and medical professionals available to answer questions at the Emory My Heart. My Life. Booth located near the main stage.

2011 Metro Atlanta Heart Walk Event Details

Atlanta Heart Walk

Date : Saturday, October 30th

Time : 9:00am (walk starts)

Distance : 5k (3.1 miles)

Location : Downtown Atlanta in the Turner Field Green Lot (755 Hank Aaron Drive, Atlanta, GA 30315). Visit www.atlantabraves.com for directions.

Festivities, such as company picnics, special heart walk activities for children, health screenings and entertainment will begin around 8:00 a.m. The 5K/3.1-mile walk begins at 9:00 a.m.

Register to Join the Emory Atlanta Heart Walk Team:

To register as part of Emory’s walking team, follow these 4 steps:

  1. Visit www.atlantaheartwalk.org
  2. To register as a participant, click Register and then click “I agree to the waiver.”
  3. Select Join a Team. Find Emory Healthcare in the drop-down box, and find the name of the team you want to join.
  4. Login to your personal Heart Walk page and personalize it by telling your story and adding a photo.

The funds raised from the Metro Atlanta Heart Walk go to support the American Heart Association’s critical research, education, and heart health advocacy initiatives. I look forward to seeing you all there!

Ijeoma Isiadinso, MDAbout Dr. Ijeoma Isiadinso
Dr. Isiadinso is a preventive cardiologist with the Emory Heart & Vascular Center. She specializes in heart disease prevention with special interests in lifestyle modification, cardiovascular risk factor screening, hyperlipidemia and women’s heart disease. She completed her medical education and training at MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine and Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia before joining Emory in 2010. Dr. Isiadinso is Associate Director of the Emory Heart & Vascular Center’s Women’s Heart Program and she is committed to helping women and men live healthy lives.

Thanks for joining us for the live chat yesterday on Women and Heart Disease.  We discussed a lot of different topics related to women and heart disease and had some great questions!  If you were unable to join us visit the past chats link on the blog site to review the transcript of the chat!

If you are a woman with heart disease and want to schedule an evaluation call 404-778-2746.  The Emory women’s heart program sees patients on Thursdays and Fridays at The Emory Clinic on Clifton Road.  Emory Women’s Heart Program provides cardiac risk assessment, diagnosis and heart disease care through a women-focused approach to cardiovascular care.  Our goal is to help women prevent heart disease and improve cardiovascular outcomes through the highest quality patient and family-centered care, research and education.

Join our team at the American Heart Association Atlanta Heart Walk on Saturday, October 29, 2011 at Turner Field.  I will be there with my colleagues and we will have physicians and medical professionals available to answer questions at the Emory My Heart. My Life. Booth located near the main stage.

Are You a Woman at Risk for Heart Disease?

Women Heart Disease ChatDespite the fact that it’s often thought of as a man’s disease, you may be surprised to learn that over 40 million women live with cardiovascular disease and over 8 million have a history of heart attack or chest pain. In fact, heart disease is the leading cause of death in American women and five times as many women die each year from heart disease than from breast cancer.

It is critical that women take control of their heart health and learn how to protect themselves from this deadly disease.  If you think you could be at risk for heart disease or just want to learn more, join me for an interactive web chat on the topic of Women and Heart Disease. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about women and heart disease including how symptoms are different in women than men, diagnosing heart disease and preventing heart disease.

Women & Heart Disease Online Chat Details:

Chat date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011
Chat time: 12:30pm
Chat registration: Women & Heart Disease: UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

About Dr. Ijeoma Isiadinso
Dr. Isiadinso is a preventive cardiologist with the Emory Heart & Vascular Center. She specializes in heart disease prevention with special interests in lifestyle modification, cardiovascular risk factor screening, hyperlipidemia and women’s heart disease. She completed her medical education and training at MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine and Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia before joining Emory in 2010. Dr. Isiadinso is an active member in the development of the Emory Heart & Vascular Center’s Women’s Heart Health Program, and she is committed to helping women and men live healthy lives.

Has Your Heart Ever Skipped a Beat?

Arrhythmia Web Chat with Dr. El-ChamiHave you ever experienced a skipped heart beat or a change in the regular beat of your heart? If so, you may have a rhythm disorder called an Arrhythmia. Arrhythmias are common in middle-aged adults. Some arrhythmias are relatively harmless, but others can be fatal if not treated. Nearly 1,000,000 people are hospitalized for an arrhythmia each year, and some arrhythmias, such as Atrial Fibrillation, are extremely common and affect over 2,500,000 million Americans.

Join me on Wednesday, August 24, at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive web chat on the topic of Diagnosing, Managing and Living with Arrhythmias. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about arrhythmias, including symptoms, diagnosis, prevention and treatment, as well as innovative new cardiovascular research on the horizon.

You can register online for the live chat! UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Dr. El-Chami

About Mikhael El-Chami, MD

Dr. El-Chami completed his residency at Emory in 2003, and he was nominated for a chief residency year at Emory in 2004. His training in cardiology and electrophysiology also was completed at Emory. His areas of clinical interest include: cardiac arrhythmia ablation, cardiac resynchronization therapy and prevention of sudden cardiac death. Dr. El-Chami holds organizational leadership memberships with the American College of Cardiology and the Heart Rhythm Society. He speaks Arabic and French fluently.

Running & Your Heart: Navigating the Peachtree Road Race and Other Adventures

Heart Running ChatHave you been training hard getting ready for the Peachtree Road Race? Is your heart in good health, too? One of the best things you can do for your heart health is to run.  Running is an excellent cardiovascular exercise that provides a wealth of healthy benefits for your overall well–being and heart health. If you are not sure about your heart health, it is important to consult with a physician who can recommend the best method for achieving heart health.

Join me on Wednesday, June 29 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive online Q&A web chat where we’ll discuss how you can ensure your heart is healthy to handle the rigors of running. I will be there to answer questions in real-time and discuss various heart related running and exercise questions.

If you are interested in learning more about how to maintain a healthy heart for running/exercising, you can register for the live chat now.  Spread the word about our online heart healthy heart chat to your fellow runners, friends and neighbors.

About Dr. Sperling

Dr. Sperling is a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center and Director of Emory’s Center for Heart Disease Prevention. He is also an accomplished runner having completed seven marathons (including New York City and Athens, Greece), and 17 consecutive Peachtree Races. Dr. Sperling’s areas of clinical interest are preventive cardiology, cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle and behavioral approaches to heart disease and management of cholesterol disorders.

About Emory Heart & Vascular

Emory Heart & Vascular Center has been consistently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top heart health centers in the nation. Your cardiovascular health is our primary concern; let us show you the Emory difference.

New PAD Resources: 7 Peripheral Artery Disease Ask the Expert Videos & Live MD Chat

Peripheral Artery Disease ResourcesAs we have discussed in previous posts on PAD, millions of people in the United States suffer from this life, and potentially limb threatening, disease. What is unfortunate is that many people don’t know they have it.  In our Peripheral Artery Disease “Ask the Expert” video series we answer many questions about PAD including:

  • What is PAD?
  • What are common symptoms of PAD?
  • How do you test for PAD?
  • When should someone be tested for PAD?
  • What are the treatment options for PAD?
  • What physicians are involved in treating PAD?
  • What kind of research is being done at Emory for PAD?

If watching the PAD videos sparks questions, join my colleague Dr. Khushrow Niazi on Monday, April 25 from 12:30p.m. – 1 :15p.m. for an interactive, online Q&A web chat on the topic of PAD. He will answer questions and discuss various topics about PAD including prevention, detection, symptoms, testing, treatment options and innovative new research.

If you think you may have PAD after viewing the videos, please call Emory HealthConnection℠ 404-778-7777 to schedule an appointment.

Do you have questions about PAD in general? If so, please let me know in the comments section.

About Ravi Veeraswamy, MD:

Dr. Veeraswamy specializes in surgery and vascular surgery, and has been practicing with Emory since 2006. Some of his areas of clinical interest include aortic aneurysm, carotid endarterectomy, peripheral arterial and vascular disease, and vascular surgery. Recently, Dr. Veeraswamy has published articles in the Washington University Manual of Surgery, Vascular and Endovascular Challenges, and the Annals of Vascular Surgery.

Join Me for a Peripheral Artery Disease Online Chat

Peripheral Artery Disease Online Doctor ChatPeripheral Artery Disease (PAD), defined as diseases of the blood vessels outside the heart or brain, affects eight to 12 million people in the United States. PAD happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, and occurs when plaque, a substance made up of fat and cholesterol, builds up on the walls of the arteries that supply blood to the arms and legs. Unfortunately, individuals with PAD are at an increased risk for heart disease, aortic aneurysms and stroke.

Additionally, PAD can be a precursor to diabetes, hypertension and various other medical conditions. If you get treatment early and take preventative steps, PAD can be managed effectively and does not  have to take over your life. Should you receive a diagnosis of PAD, you can often stop or reverse the buildup of plaque in the arteries with dietary changes, exercise and efforts to lower high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. You can take control by leading a heart-healthy lifestyle and most cases of PAD can be managed with lifestyle changes and medication.

Join me on Monday, April 25 from 12:30 – 1:15pm for an interactive online Q&A web chat on the topic of PAD. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about PAD including prevention, detection, symptoms, testing, treatment options and innovative new research.

If you are interested in learning more about this topic, you may register online for the live chat now. Spread the word about our education session to your friends who may suffer from this potentially debilitating disease.

About Dr. Khusrow Niazi

Dr. Niazi specializes in interventional cardiology, carotid artery disease, peripheral artery disease and venous disease of the legs. He has been practicing at Emory since 2003. He has been involved in many trials in treating blockages in the carotid arteries and leg arteries with less invasive options. Dr. Niazi is involved in trials focused on the removal of plaque from the leg arteries with less invasive methods