Posts Tagged ‘cardiology’

Emory Expansion Update: Emory General Cardiology is On the Move!

Emory Expansion UpdateTo provide a better patient care experience and align demand with available capacity, many Emory Clinic (TEC) and Emory Healthcare practices are relocating to redesigned clinical space and/or new locations, either temporarily or permanently. This is to accommodate both patients and our physicians more comfortably.

As of May 5th, the following General Cardiology providers will temporarily move down the street to the 4th floor of the 1525 Clifton Road clinic:

Beginning on Monday, May 5th, our patients will be seeing these providers at their new location.

The new address is:
The Emory Clinic at 1525 Clifton Road
1525 Clifton Road, NE
4th Floor
Atlanta, Georgia 30322

For more information, call 404-778-5299 or get details online, at: http://emoryhealthcare.org/expansion/moves.html

Two Emory Physicians Receive Prestigious Cardiovascular Awards from the American College of Cardiology!

Emory physicians Nanette Wenger, MD and Vinod Thourani, MD were recently awarded prestigious honors from the American College of Cardiology.

Nanette K. Wenger, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, was recently honored by the American College of Cardiology with its inaugural 2013 Distinguished Mentor Award in recognition of her dedication to mentorship and tremendous role in shaping the careers of current and future leaders in cardiology.

“Throughout my career, mentoring women and men in cardiology, including students, residents, cardiology trainees, faculty, and community physicians, has been equally a passion and a reward,” says Wenger. “The science and practice of cardiology will be advanced by its emerging leaders, and it has been my privilege to contribute to their progress.”

Dr. Wenger is internationally recognized as a leading authority on coronary heart disease in women and has accumulated dozens of prestigious awards throughout her career. Her greatest legacy is changing the face of cardiology. In 1993, Wenger coauthored a landmark article in the New England Journal of Medicine that aggressively addressed the prejudice that heart disease was a man’s disease. Research led by Wenger resulted in significant changes to the way drugs and hormones

Dr. Wenger came to Emory University and Grady Memorial Hospital in 1958 and since then she has been a trailblazer and icon in the field of cardiology as author and co-author of more than 1,400 scientific and review articles and book chapters.  Wenger helped write the 2011 Guidelines for Preventing Cardiovascular Disease in Women. In 2009, her fiftieth year at Emory, Wenger’s extraordinary career achievements were celebrated with the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American College of Cardiology.

Vinod Thourani, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and cardiothoracic surgeon at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center has been awarded the W. Proctor Harvey, MD, Young Teacher Award at the 2013 American College of Cardiology’s (ACC). He was one of two recipients to receive the prestigious award this year, which is awarded every two years.  The award recognizes and honors a promising young member of the American College of Cardiology who has distinguished him or herself by dedication and skill in teaching, and to stimulate, as far as possible, continued careers in education. Thourani was selected from among a highly competitive group of academic cardiologists to receive the award.

“I am honored to be given this teaching award from the ACC,”" says Thourani, who is an associate professor of surgery, in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine. “”Teaching the next generation of physicians, and mentoring them to be the best they can be, is critical in academic medicine, and to the health care system as a whole. I thoroughly enjoy the teaching component of my profession.”

About Dr. Wenger

Dr. Wenger is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine and a Consultant to the Emory Heart and Vascular Center. Dr. Wenger is a graduate of Hunter College (summa cum laude) and the Harvard Medical School. She had her residency training in Internal Medicine and Cardiology fellowship at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and additional Fellowship in Cardiology at the Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Wenger is a Past Vice-President of the American Heart Association, past Governor for Georgia of the American College of Cardiology, is a Past-President of the Georgia Heart Association. She has served as a member and frequently chairperson of over 500 committees, scientific advisory boards, task forces, and councils of the American Medical Association, the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Society of Geriatric Cardiology. Dr. Wenger is also active in a variety of state and local charitable, cultural, and religious organizations. She is a Fellow of the American Heart Association, the American College of Cardiology, the Society of Geriatric Cardiology, the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, and the American College of Chest Physicians. She is a Master of the American College of Physicians. The American Heart Association awarded her the Distinguished Achievement Award, the Women in Cardiology Mentoring Award, and the highest award of the Association, the Gold Heart Award 

About Dr. Thourani

Dr. Thourani specializes in percutaneous transcatheter (transfemoral, transapical, transapical) and minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, minimally invasive mitral valve repair and replacement, aortic valve surgery and ascending aortic aneurysm repair, lone and concomitant atrial fibrillation surgery, and on and off pump coronary artery revascularization. As Associate Director of the Cardiothoracic Surgery Clinical Research Unit, Dr. Thourani is developing innovative strategies and devices to treat cardiothoracic diseases, specifically in the field of structural heart disease and valve surgery. He is a local surgical Co-PI for the multi-center PARTNER transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) trials. PARTNER 1 was instrumental in influencing the FDA’s 2011 approval of the the SAPIEN™ transfemoral transcatheter heart valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. In 2012 Dr. Thourani presented the results of the PARTNER 2 trial, which showed that TAVR was not only as effective as the alternative minimally invasive technique, but might also be safer in the short term. Dr. Thourani is a member of multiple national leadership and publication committees for the treatment of valve surgery using percutaneous or minimally invasive techniques

Related Resources

Honoring Emory Cardiologist, Nanette K. Wenger, MD

Emory cardiologist, Nanette K. Wenger, MD, was awarded the highest honor for contributions in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

Nanette K. Wenger, MD, MACC, MACP, FAHA

We are proud to recognize, Emory cardiologist and professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, Nanette K. Wenger, M.D., who was named a Master of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (MAACVPR). She received this outstanding honor in recognition of her continued outstanding contributions to the field of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and to the care of persons with cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. The AACVPR is an organization that promotes health and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

“It was exciting to have been involved in the development of and advocacy for cardiac rehabilitation several decades ago, when many considered it an experimental intervention,” says Dr. Wenger. “The enormous satisfaction today is that it is an accepted component of the continuum of cardiac care, with cardiac rehabilitation being a Class IA recommendation in all contemporary cardiovascular clinical practice guidelines.”

Dr. Wenger is internationally renowned for her research and clinical work on coronary heart disease in women. She has been a trailblazer and icon in the field of cardiology as author and co–author of more than 1,300 scientific and review articles and book chapters.

For more information, read the news story on Nanette, K. Wenger, M.D. and this prestigious honor.

News from Emory’s Adult Congenital Heart Center

News from Emory’s Adult Congenital Heart Center

Dr. Wendy BookEmory’s Adult Congenital Heart (EACH) Center was selected as one of 5 centers in the US to participate in an academic-community collaborative education program. The program, called the Provider Action for Treating Congenital Hearts, or PATCH, was designed in collaboration with the Adult Congenital Heart Association (ACHA) and the American College of Cardiology’s Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (ACPC) Section to address the challenges faced by pediatric and adult cardiology community as more and more patients with congenital heart defects look to them for care.

The program provides a significant opportunity for Emory’s Adult Congenital Heart Center, led by Dr. Wendy Book (Medical Director), Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Georgia ACC and the community. With collaborative efforts from the SIBLEY Heart with a special thanks to the hard work of Dr. Robert Vincent (GA ACC, Sibley Heart) and Dr. Michael McConnell.

You may find more information about the PATCH program and the ACHA in our related resources area below.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Committees

Dr. Wendy Book, Medical Director of Emory’s Adult Congenital Heart Center and cardiologist at Emory University Hospital Midtown, has been asked to serve on the Centers for Disease Control Expert Panel – “Adults with Congenital Heart Disease,” to help guide future public health research in the field of congenital heart disease. Dr. Book will join Dr. Michael McConnell, an Emory Clinic Pediatrician, who also serves on the steering committee.

This is not the first time Dr. Wendy Book has been asked to provide her expertise through CDC programs and events. Dr. Book also serves as a member of Georgia’s Maternal Mortality Review Committee with the CDC. The mission of this committee is to identify and review pregnancy-associated deaths in Georgia and to develop interventions that may reduce maternal deaths.

Related Resources

Emory Teams Giving Back During Holidays

Emory gives backThe Emory Department of Cardiology started an annual holiday tradition 15 years ago when one of the employees asked that instead of exchanging gifts within the department they could sponsor a family in need.  Each year the tradition has grown and the department has worked with the CASA (Fulton County Court Appointed Special Advocates) to support 20 children per year!

This year, the cardiology department team expanded the reach of their tradition, by including the Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology. In doing so, our Emory team was able to provide holiday gifts for 56 children that are in the care of the Fulton County court system.  These are children that have either been abandon by their parents or removed from their homes by the courts. They are housed in dormitories and temporary foster homes and truly in need of  help.

Emory team members purchased gifts ranging from toys, to bikes, to clothing, to books and educational aids for the children for the holiday season to bring some extra joy their way. Unfortunately, doing so during the holidays is not enough. The need is great and occurs year round.  Everything from diapers to iPODs are needed for these children from our Atlanta community.

We hope to continue to expand this effort across Emory Healthcare and Emory University in the years ahead.  Many children will have a little more joy in their day because of the generosity of a small group of employees.  What would the world be like if we all shared a little of what we have with those in more need than us?

Have you started a holiday tradition to give back? If so, please share yours with us in the comments below!

Exploring VAD Therapy

In this video, I go into more detail about VAD therapy and show you an actual VAD device:

Ventricular Assist Devices: Hope for the Broken-Hearted

HeartMate II® LVAD; reprinted with permission from Thoratec Corporation

Many of you are aware of the benefits of heart transplant in patients with advanced heart failure; however, another form of therapy has been quietly emerging as a viable option for patients suffering from this condition.

A ventricular assist device (VAD) is a battery-operated mechanical pump that helps a weakened heart pump blood into the body. Essentially, it takes over the pumping action of the heart and drives blood into the aorta (the large artery that extends from the left ventricle of the heart and into the abdomen) and throughout the body. The device resides both inside and outside of the body, and is operated by an electric motor powered by a battery pack. The controller and batteries are typically worn over the shoulder or around the waist.

In most cases, VADs offer a short-term solution for patients awaiting a suitable donor for a heart transplant, particularly if their medical therapy has failed or if they’ve been hospitalized with end-stage heart failure. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing, over 2,900 Americans are currently awaiting a heart transplant (43 of which are in Georgia).

However, in some cases patients turn to VADs as an alternative to a heart transplant. We refer to this as ‘destination therapy’, meaning that the LVAD serves as a permanent solution for patients with advanced heart failure. Patients who are not heart transplant candidates but who have severe heart failure often pursue this course of treatment.

Ventricular Assist Devices support the left ventricle (LVAD), the right ventricle (RVAD) or both simultaneously (biventricular, or BiVAD). LVADs are used most commonly, and have been in existence for over twenty-five years.

A recent study comparing a new generation LVAD to an older model showed a marked improvement in survival at 2 years (58% vs 25%). In addition, patients reported an improved quality of life. As a result the FDA approved the Heartmate II as destination therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure.

Despite the severity of their illnesses, 70-80% of LVAD patients survive to transplantation.

There are several different types of LVADs, and I’ll go into more detail about specific devices and technology that the Emory Heart and Vascular Center utilizes in a later post. You’ll also hear from two very special patients who have been kind enough to share their stories with us.

Do you have any questions or thoughts about VAD technology or heart conditions in general? If so, please share them with me in the comments.

About Sonjoy Laskar, MD:

Dr. Laskar joined Emory Healthcare in 2005 and has devoted his career to providing direct care to patients with heart failure, heart transplantation and ventricular assist devices, as well as to teaching residents and fellows. He is an active researcher in the areas of echocardiography and ventricular assist devices as destination therapy, and is a member of the American College of Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America and the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

Welcome to ‘Advancing Your Health’

Emory Heart and Vascular Center is thrilled to participate in the launch of the new Emory Healthcare blog, titled ‘Advancing Your Health’. This is our opportunity to converse with you, share stories, offer advice, and educate you on matters of the heart, including medical procedures and advances. Our bloggers are physicians, patients, and well, you. We encourage you to post your comments, questions and thoughts. We’re here to serve as a sounding board as well as a resource for information.

In this month’s series of blog posts, we’ll explore the methodology behind LVAD/VAD technology and hear stories from William Shaw and Rachel Moore, two Emory Heart and Vascular patients.

As our blog progresses, there may be topics that you’d like for us to touch on. If so, speak up and let us know! Emory’s ‘Advancing Your Health’ blog is as much yours as it is ours.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Robert Guyton, MD, Professor of Surgery, Chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery

Douglas C. Morris, MD, J. Willis Hurst Professor of Medicine, Director of the Emory Heart Center and Chief of Cardiology at Emory University Hospital