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Fighting Heart Disease One Step at a Time

Michelle Brown with her Mother

Michelle Brown (left) pictured with her Mother, Mary Allen.

Emory Heart & Vascular Center employee, Michelle Brown, recently participated in the 2013 American Heart Association Heart Walk for herself and her late mother. Michelle’s mother, Mary Allen, was diagnosed with heart failure in her 40s and passed away from the disease in 2012. Her mom was an amazing role model to her and her family and Michelle wanted to memorialize her in the walk this year.

After losing her mother, Michelle, who is also in her 40s, decided she needed to change her lifestyle to avoid developing heart failure herself. Her mother had always encouraged her to lose weight and exercise so Michelle decided to start walking. She now walks 3 miles, 3 days a week and has changed her eating habits. As a result, she has lost 23 pounds in 3 months! She is motivated to continue her healthy lifestyle journey to live a long healthy life.

Watch the inspirational story below:

Michelle was a team captain for the Heart Walk this year. As a result of her efforts, she encouraged over 90 people to sign up to walk and raised $2290. She was instrumental in helping Emory Healthcare raise the most money than any other organization in Atlanta. Emory Healthcare raised close to $250,000 to fight heart disease in the 2013 Atlanta Heart Walk.

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Welcoming New Medical Director of the Saint Joseph’s Hospital Heart Failure Clinic

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Dr. David Markham, MD, MSc

Emory Center for Heart Failure and Transplantation and Saint Joseph’s Hospital are pleased to welcome David Markham, MD, MSc, to the team as the medical director of the Heart Failure Clinic at Saint Joseph’s Hospital.

Markham is an experienced heart failure and transplant cardiologist and has performed groundbreaking work in the area of assist device physiology.

“I’m excited that Dr. Markham will be leading heart failure services and our partnership with Saint Joseph’s,” says Andrew Smith, MD, director of the Center for Heart Failure and Transplantation and chief of cardiology at Emory University Hospital. “He will continue the progress we’ve already made over the past few months with the Advanced Heart Failure Network and the consolidation of services for network patients at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Saint Joseph’s Hospital. These steps benefit our patients and enhance the services we offer.”

Markham received his undergraduate and medical degrees from Emory in 1991 and 1995, respectively and is a native of Marietta, GA. He completed an internship and residency at the University of Virginia, a post-doctoral fellowship in clinical and molecular cardiology at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and a fellowship in cardiology with advanced training in heart failure and cardiac transplantation at Duke University Medical Center.

Before his return to Emory, Markham was medical director of the Heart Failure Clinic at Parkland Memorial Hospital and associate director of heart failure, assist devices and cardiac transplantation at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

About the Emory and Saint Joseph’s Center for Advanced Heart Failure

The Advanced Heart Failure Network is an enhanced cardiac collaboration that includes expert care from subspecialists at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Saint Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta. For over 20 years Emory Healthcare and Saint Joseph’s Hospital have had the largest advanced heart failure programs in Georgia. The new collaboration will focus on meeting the needs of patients and their families dealing with heart failure. Patients in need of advanced heart failure management, medical and surgical management of other heart conditions and related therapies, may now access treatment at any of the three facilities.

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Honoring Emory Cardiologist, Nanette K. Wenger, MD

Emory cardiologist, Nanette K. Wenger, MD, was awarded the highest honor for contributions in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.

Nanette K. Wenger, MD, MACC, MACP, FAHA

We are proud to recognize, Emory cardiologist and professor of medicine in the division of cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, Nanette K. Wenger, M.D., who was named a Master of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (MAACVPR). She received this outstanding honor in recognition of her continued outstanding contributions to the field of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and to the care of persons with cardiovascular and pulmonary disease. The AACVPR is an organization that promotes health and prevention of cardiovascular disease.

“It was exciting to have been involved in the development of and advocacy for cardiac rehabilitation several decades ago, when many considered it an experimental intervention,” says Dr. Wenger. “The enormous satisfaction today is that it is an accepted component of the continuum of cardiac care, with cardiac rehabilitation being a Class IA recommendation in all contemporary cardiovascular clinical practice guidelines.”

Dr. Wenger is internationally renowned for her research and clinical work on coronary heart disease in women. She has been a trailblazer and icon in the field of cardiology as author and co–author of more than 1,300 scientific and review articles and book chapters.

For more information, read the news story on Nanette, K. Wenger, M.D. and this prestigious honor.

Emory Heart & Vascular Center Offers Telehealth Services

Those of us who live in metropolitan areas typically have the luxury of easy access to major medical facilities. However, having access to medical specialists and subspecialists is often a challenge for people who live in rural areas within the state of Georgia. Fortunately, Emory Heart & Vascular Center has a technologically savvy solution this dilemma: Telehealth Services.

A Telehealth encounter simulates an in-office consultation or visit between a doctor and patient—the only difference is that a Telehealth appointment involves cameras and computer screens with specialized tools that transmit live video and medical information between physicians and patients. This technology can even communicate ultrasound images and stethoscope sounds. With our Telehealth capabilities, Georgians can typically limit their travel from their homes to 30 miles or less. Currently, Georgia has over 50 consultation sites, all equipped with Telehealth technology available for immediate use for all Georgians.

We provide a full range of more than 20 credentialed and board-certified specialists for Telehealth consultations. Emory Heart & Vascular Center is also affiliated with the Georgia Partnership For Telehealth, a charitable nonprofit organization. Together, we’re able to provide you with quick and convenient access to some of the country’s leading heart specialists.

Here is a list of our Specialty Services we offer through Teleheath:

General Cardiology

Adult Congenital Cardiology & Surgery

Electrophysiology

Heart Failure & Transplant

Cardiac Catheterization

Interventional Cardiology

Cardiothoracic Surgery

Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction / Cardiac Rehabilitation

Cardiac Imaging (PET, MRI, CT)

Electrocardiography

Peripheral Vascular Disease Intervention

Emory Heart and Vascular Center cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons are available for Telehealth consults Monday-Friday during regular business hours. To schedule a consult, contact the Georgia Partnership for Telehealth at 1-866-754-HEAL(4325).

Do you have any questions about Telehealth services through Emory Heart & Vascular? If so, be sure to let me know in the comments section.

About Byron Williams, Jr., MD:

Dr. Williams has been practicing medicine at Emory since 1994, and is a Martha West Looney Professor of Medicine as well as the Chief of Medicine at Emory University Hospital Midtown. His specialties include Internal Medicine (board certified since 1997) and Cardiology (board certified since 1981). Dr. Williams is a member of several organizational leaderships, including the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the American Medical Association.