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Emory Expansion Update: Emory Cardiovascular Specialists and the Emory Heart and Vascular Center at Saint Joseph’s are On the Move!

on-the-move-300x114To provide a better patient care experience and align demand with available capacity, many Emory Clinic and Emory Healthcare practices are relocating to redesigned clinical space and/or new locations. The new spaces will be more inviting for patients and more accommodating to the needs of our physicians as well.

As of April 28, 2014, Emory Cardiovascular Specialists and the Emory Heart and Vascular Center at Saint Joseph’s are moving to a new and shared location at the 5671 Building, Suite 300, on the third floor.

Beginning April 28th, the patients of the following providers will be seen at the new location:

Emory Cardiovascular Specialists:

Emory Heart and Vascular Center at Saint Joseph’s:

For more information, call 404-778-6070 or get details online, at: http://emoryhealthcare.org/expansion/moves.html

How to Fall Asleep Faster!

Tips to Fall AsleepDo you have a hard time falling asleep? Women are busier than ever and as a result at the end of the day, many women have a hard time falling asleep. In an American Heart Association article, Emory Women’s Heart Center Clinical Director, Gina Lundberg, MD offers a few tips to help women get to sleep faster and stay asleep longer.

Here is a sneak peak at the some of her tips to help you fall asleep faster!

  • Exercise regularly
  • Avoid stimulants before bed
  • Establish a relaxation routine
  • Stay away from sleep medications

Emory and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Partner to Form Georgia’s First Comprehensive Congenital Heart Center

We are excited to announce the launch of the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia, collaboration between Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare. The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a comprehensive program for children and adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) that provides a continuum of lifesaving care from before birth through adulthood. It is the first comprehensive CHD program in the South and one of the largest in the country.

The program is led by Emory Healthcare cardiologist Wendy Book, MD, along with Robert Campbell, MD, chief of cardiac services and director of cardiology at Children’s Sibley Heart Center.

Not too long ago, most babies born with serious heart defects died in childhood. Thanks to advances in cardiac care, many patients with congenital heart defects are able to live well into adulthood. However, as adults, they need ongoing, specialized care that a practice like the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia can provide.

Even if a person born with a congenital heart defect is not experiencing symptoms, he or she should continue to receive regular, ongoing medical management. Recent research shows that 40% of people between 13 and 21 with congenital heart defects discontinue care for their heart condition. The newly formed Congenital Heart Center of Georgia will help patients make a seamless transition from pediatric to adult care, as well as make sure they benefit from the latest medical research and receive the most appropriate treatments available.

For more information about the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia, please visit www.congenitalheartgeorgia.org.

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Dr. Wendy BookAbout Wendy Book, MD
Dr. Book is a professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at Emory Healthcare. She specializes in cardiology, internal medicine and transplantation and is the director of the Emory Adult Congenital Heart (EACH) Center. Her areas of clinical interest include congenital heart disease, pregnancy in women with heart defects, heart failure and cardiac transplantation. Dr. Book has been practicing at Emory since 1998 and is highly regarded by her patients and colleagues.

Fish Oil Can Improve Heart & Brain Health

Fish Oil Supplements Heart HealthPhysicians and nutritionists advocate that individuals should eat 2 – 3.5 ounce servings of fish high in omega – 3s each week to improve heart and brain health. When eating this amount is not possible, many experts recommend substituting fish oil supplements. In fact, Emory Women’s Heart Center clinical director Gina Lundberg, MD recommends fish oil supplements for all patients after 50 years old.

A study has recently shown that women over the age of 50 who consumed the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids maintain better brain function than those who consumed lower levels. While fish oils have not been proven in research to reduce heart attack and strokes, the benefits of consuming fish oil are great. Foods (and supplements) that contain omega – 3 fatty acids (such as fish and fish oil) can reduce an individuals risk of abnormal heart rhythms such as arrhythmia and can delay plaque growth rate in the arteries. Further, omega – 3s and/or fish oil can also help lower blood pressure. A generic over the counter fish oil supplements can provide a similar benefit to the more expensive omega – 3 prescription fish oils at a lower cost, say Dr. Lundberg. Read the entire article published in USA Today to learn more as well as determine which fish oil supplements may be the best for your heart and brain health.

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About Gina Lundberg, MD
Dr. Gina LundbergDr. Lundberg, Emory Women’s Center Clinical Director, is a Preventive Cardiologist with The Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

She is a National AHA Spokesperson. Dr. Lundberg has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta from 2001 till 2007 and was on the Southeast Affiliate Board 2006-2007. She also served on the SEA Strategic Health Initiatives Committee to promote Go Red for Women. She has been involved in every program related to the Go Red for Women initiative for the metro Atlanta area since its development in 2003. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for North Fulton/ Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009 she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is a Circle of Red founding member and Core Vitae member for AHA. She also serves on the ACCF Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.
She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women on CNN and in USA Today. Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the Advisory Board for the Department of Women’s Health for the State of Georgia in 2007 till 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman Magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008 Atlanta Woman Magazine named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine. She has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and recertified in both in 2002. Dr. Lundberg has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career. Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in the metro Atlanta area.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.
Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

New Guidelines Suggest Risk Factors, Not Cholesterol Levels, Should Determine Cardiovascular Treatment Options

Statin Medications for patients with cardiovascular Risk FactorsThe American Heart Association (AHA) in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology recently released new, more aggressive cardiovascular treatment guidelines.  The new guidelines indicate that patients should be evaluated by their risk factors instead of a cholesterol number to determine if they should be prescribed medications.  Many patients who in the past would not have been prescribed statin medications will now be evaluated to determine if the medication is necessary.

Some of the risk factors physicians will take into consideration when evaluating a patient are:

  • Has the patient been diagnosed with heart disease?  This includes if the patient has ever had a heart attack or stroke.
    • If yes, your cholesterol should probably be managed with medication.
  • Does the patient have diabetes, type I or type II?
    • According to Emory Women’s Heart Center clinical director, Gina Lundberg, MD, “heart disease is the number one killer of all diabetics”.  Diabetics often need to manage their cholesterol with statin medications.
  • Does the patient have an LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) level of over 190.
    • According to the new cardiovascular treatment guidelines, if a patient is over 21 years old and has an LDL level above 190 he/she should be prescribed a statin medication.
  • Does the patient have a heart attack risk greater than 7.5%?

If a patient falls into any one of the risk factor categories above, they should be put on a statin according to the new guidelines. The new guidelines will hopefully prevent heart attacks and strokes in many patients who were previously not on statins to control cholesterol.

Related Resources:

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Gina Lundberg, MD

Dr. Gina LundbergGina Price Lundberg, MD FACC is the Director of the Heart Center for Women. She founded and directed The Women’s Heart Center, the first women’s cardiac prevention program in the state of Georgia in 1998.

She was named by Governor Sonny Perdue to the Advisory Board for Women’s Health, Georgia Department of Women’s Health, Department of Community Health for 2007-2008. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University and teaches cardiology fellows at Grady Hospital. She also teaches medical students from the Medical College of Georgia in preventive cardiology. She is a member of the American College of Cardiologist’s Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.

She has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta since 2001. She has been involved with the Go Red for Women campaign since it launched in 2004. She has been on the Southeast Affiliate for the AHA’s Strategic Initiative Committee representing Go Red for Women. She is national speaker for the American Heart Association. She has also been working with the national organization, Sister to Sister Foundation from 2004 till the present with their Atlanta program.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women in Glamour Magazine, MD News, the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, the Atlanta Business Chronicle, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and other magazines. She has been interviewed on numerous local news shows and many radio programs over the years. Dr. Lundberg has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in Atlanta, GA. She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in private practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and re-certified in both in 2002. She has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career.

Moderate-Intensity Walking Can Lower Diabetes Risk & Boost Overall Health

Walking For Your HealthWalking is one of the most popular, cheapest as well as convenient exercises you can do. A recent study completed at George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) and published in Diabetes Care indicates that moderate – intensity walking is one of the best prescriptions for improving your overall health. In order to receive the maximum benefit from this activity, it is important to work on getting your heart rate up. When you are walking you should be able to hold a conversation with your walking partner but that you are not completely out of breath.

The study showed that a short (15 minutes) moderate – intensity walk after each meal in patients at risk for Type 2 diabetes helped control blood sugar. The research was done with 10 overweight, sedentary, pre – diabetic individuals indicated walking is beneficial because it helps to clear blood sugar by the muscle contractions.

Read the full USA Today article to get some tips on walking to ensure you are maximizing your effort and the net benefit!

National government guidelines recommend adults get at least 2 ½ hours of moderate – intensity physical activity each week in addition to strengthening exercises so get walking today! You could be adding years to your life and have fun at the same time!

Related Resources:

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Gina Lundberg, MD

Dr. Gina LundbergGina Price Lundberg, MD FACC is the Director of the Heart Center for Women. She founded and directed The Women’s Heart Center, the first women’s cardiac prevention program in the state of Georgia in 1998.

She was named by Governor Sonny Perdue to the Advisory Board for Women’s Health, Georgia Department of Women’s Health, Department of Community Health for 2007-2008. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University and teaches cardiology fellows at Grady Hospital. She also teaches medical students from the Medical College of Georgia in preventive cardiology. She is a member of the American College of Cardiologist’s Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.

She has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta since 2001. She has been involved with the Go Red for Women campaign since it launched in 2004. She has been on the Southeast Affiliate for the AHA’s Strategic Initiative Committee representing Go Red for Women. She is national speaker for the American Heart Association. She has also been working with the national organization, Sister to Sister Foundation from 2004 till the present with their Atlanta program.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women in Glamour Magazine, MD News, the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, the Atlanta Business Chronicle, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and other magazines. She has been interviewed on numerous local news shows and many radio programs over the years. Dr. Lundberg has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in Atlanta,GA. She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in private practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and re-certified in both in 2002. She has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career.

Emory Cardiologist Elected President of American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Emory Heart & Vascular CenterEmory Heart & Vascular cardiologist, Laurence S. Sperling, MD, was recently named the president-elect of the American Society for Preventive Cardiology (ASPC). Dr. Sperling’s two-year-term will begin in 2014.

The ASPC was founded in 1975 and represents the increasingly multidisciplinary group of healthcare providers (including nurses, nurse practitioners, dieticians and other healthcare specialists in addition to physicians) along with researchers and industry representatives who share an interest in and passion for preventive cardiology.

Dr. Sperling is the medical director of the Emory’s Heart Disease Prevention Center and also serves as medical director for a number of unique programs at Emory including the HeartWise Risk Reduction Program and Optimal Living. In 2004, Dr. Sperling founded and currently directs the first and only LDL apheresis program in the state of Georgia. He has also been instrumental in the development of the Emory Women’s Heart Center which will be opening up two new locations, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Johns Creek Hospital, in September 2014.

Sperling has been an investigator in a number of important clinical trials and has authored more than 150 manuscripts, abstracts and book chapters. He is co-editor of the American College of Cardiology’s Diabetes Self Assessment Program and has served as special consultant to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 2011, Sperling has served annually on the U.S. News & World Report’s panel of 22 national dietary experts evaluating the country’s most popular diets for the publication’s “Best Diets” rankings.

Congratulations Dr. Sperling! We are happy to have you on the Emory team.

About Dr. Laurence Sperling

Dr. Laurence Sperling

Dr. Sperling specializes in internal medicine and cardiology—his areas of clinical interest are cardiac catheterization, cardiac rehabilitation, general cardiology, echocardiogram, lipid metabolism, and electron beam computed tomography. Dr. Sperling has received various awards from the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association Council, and Emory University Hospital and has been a special consultant to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Sperling received his undergraduate degree from Emory College and graduated with his medical degree from Emory University School of Medicine in 1989. He subsequently completed eight additional years of training at Emory, including a residency in internal medicine, chief resident year at Emory University Hospital, a National Institutes of Health-supported research fellowship in molecular and vascular medicine and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases.

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Dr. Samady talks George W. Bush, Cardiac Angioplasty with Associated Press

Many of the Associated Press new stories on former United States President George W. Bush’s recent surgery to unblock an artery in his heart feature discussion from Emory Heart & Vascular Center’s Director of Interventional Cardiology, Habib Samady, MD, who was interviewed to discuss details of the former President’s cardiac angioplasty and how arteries in the heart become blocked.

During a routine physical, doctors found a blockage in Bush’s artery. In order to open up the artery blockage, cardiologists at a Texas hospital performed a cardiac angioplasty procedure.

Dr. Samady says it takes 20 to 30 years for cholesterol to build up in the arteries. When the narrowing of the blood vessel gets to 80– 90 % then the blockage will limit blood flow. When this occurs patients may experience symptoms of heart disease such as:

• Chest pain
• Pressure in chest
• Shortness of breath
• Fatigue

Learn more about cardiac angioplasties and the former President’s heart surgery in this AP video featuring Dr. Samady!

Cardiac angioplasties are fairly common procedures and many times the patients go home the same day or the next day. They can be performed for outpatients with symptoms of angina or evidence of low blood flow on a stress test or for inpatients with heart attacks or “near heart attacks”. Emory cardiologists were pioneers in developing the angioplasty procedure in the 1980’s. Former Emory cardiologist Andreas Gruentzig performed the first balloon angioplasty in 1977 in Zurich, Switzerland before immigrating to the United States and coming to Emory from where the procedure was taught and disseminated through out the world. In 1987, Emory interventional cardiologists were the first to deploy coronary stents in the United States and currently are national leaders in determining which patient needs to have a blockage unblocked by measuring blood flow in each artery as well as in the use of miniaturized ultrasound and infrared cameras for the optimal deployment of coronary stents.

Dr. Habib SamadyAbout Habib Samady, MD
Dr. Samady is the Director of Interventional Cardiology at Emory Hospitals as well as an Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. He has been practicing medicine for over 20 years and has been on faculty at Emory since 1998. Dr. Samady has been instrumental in the development of the interventional cardiology program at Emory. He specializes in cardiac cauterization, interventional cardiology, nuclear cardiology and valve disease. He is a published author and has published several articles in peer reviewed publications.

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Christine Nell – Dybdahl Awarded 2013 Life Changer Award

HeartWise events AtlantaEmory Heart & Vascular Center, Nurse Practitioner, Christine Nell – Dybdahl, MSN, MPH was recently awarded the 2013 Life Changer Award by the Health Monitor Magazine, in conjunction with the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP).

Christine was nominated by two of her patients in her preventive cardiovascular clinic who nominated her because of her great compassion and concern for all of her patients. One patient noted, that “Christine has so much humanity that she brings to the office”. The award recognizes and honors outstanding service to patients and community care by nurse practitioners.

Christine has been a nurse practitioner at Emory for 14 years and is currently the Clinical Nurse Director within the Emory Center for Heart Disease Prevention. She also is very active in the Women’s Heart program at Emory. She is adjunct faculty with the Emory School of Nursing. We are very proud to have Christine as a part of the Emory Heart & Vascular Center team!

Learn more about this honor and about Christine in this short video

New Treatments for High Risk Complex Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Patients

Aortic Aneurysm TreatmentIn recent years, endovascular techniques have greatly improved the safety of surgical treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) who had concomitant health conditions that affect cardio-pulmonary and renal function. Because many patients with AAAs do not qualify for endo-vascular repair, newer procedures called “fenestrated and branched endografts” were designed as an alternative for these patients. Until recently, fenestrated endografts were not commercially available and surgeons had to modify grafts themselves to repair the AAAs. In November of 2012, Emory vascular surgeons Yazan Duwayri, MD, and Ravi Veeraswamy, MD, performed Georgia’s first implantation of an U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved fenestrated graft. The new device can be used to repair aneurysms in patients who are not candidates for other traditional repair options.

Treatment Options for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

Emory offers the full range of treatment options for abdominal aortic aneurysms, including open and endovascular repair techniques. For patients who are not candidates for the newer FDA-approved devices, Emory surgeons still offer open surgical and endovascular repair using the chimney and snorkel techniques. We tailor AAA treatment, selecting the treatment option that is most appropriate for each patient. Learn more about our

There are many benefits to fenestrated endovascular repair including:

  • Shorter days in ICU
  • Less blood loss
  • Fewer mortalities
  • Fewer complications post surgery
  • Shorter average number of days to resume normal diet
  • Fewer days spent in the hospital

Fenestrated Graft Procedure Video



Learn more about fenestrated and branched endografts >>


Dr. Ravi VeeraswamyAbout Ravi Veeraswamy, MD

Dr. Veeraswamy specializes in vascular surgery, and has been practicing with Emory since 2006. Some of his areas of clinical interest include aortic aneurysm repair, carotid endarterectomy and stenting, peripheral arterial and vascular disease, and vascular surgery. Recently, Dr. Veeraswamy has published articles in the Washington University Manual of Surgery, Vascular and Endovascular Challenges, and the Annals of Vascular Surgery.

 

Yazan Duwayri, M.D.About Yazan Duwayri, MD

Dr. Duwayri specializes in endoluminal and endovascular surgery. His areas of clinical interest include treatment of carotid stenosis, abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms, aortoiliac occlusive disease, renal arterial stenosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, dialysis access, peripheral arterial disease, and venous disease. He has published articles in several journals including the Journal of Vascular Surgery and Annals of Vascular Surgery, in addition to several textbook chapters.

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