News

Expanding Cardiovascular Team

Emory Healthcare is constantly growing, and in doing so continues to welcome some of the best faculty and staff members in the industry. Here’s a spotlight on two of the newest members of our cardiovascular team:

Camden Hebson, MD
Camden Hebson, MDDr. Hebson was born in Gadsden, Alabama and raised in Birmingham. He attended Vanderbilt University for undergraduate training and then returned to Alabama for medical school. Dr. Hebson joined Emory Healthcare eight years ago and has since completed a pediatric residency, chief residency, pediatric cardiology fellowship, and an advanced fellowship in adult congenital cardiology.

Dr. Hebson now cares for both children and adults with congenital heart disease. He focuses on lifelong care and has particular interest in patients with single ventricle disease, aortopathies (including bicuspid aortic valves), and patients with congenital heart disease who become pregnant. He sees patients at both The Emory Clinic located on Clifton Road and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital.

Dr. Hebson enjoys spending time with his family – wife Carolyn, son Henry, and daughter Alice. His other interests outside of cardiology include fishing, leisure reading, and being a self proclaimed “baseball junkie.”

Jonathan Kim, MD
Jonathan Kim, MDDr. Kim is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology, and additionally holds an adjunct Assistant Professorship in the Division of Applied Physiology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Kim received his Bachelor of Science in Biology at Emory in 1998. He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and studied in Melbourne, Australia before attending Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He completed his internship and residency in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard University before completing his General Cardiology fellowship at Emory in 2014. Dr. Kim was chief fellow at Emory between 2013-14. Dr. Kim joined the faculty at Emory in 2014 as part of the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute.

Dr. Kim’s research focuses on issues relevant to sports cardiology and exercise physiology. His interest and published work in this field began during his time in Boston, and continued as a fellow at Emory. Dr. Kim has engaged in and published work analyzing exercise-induced cardiovascular remodeling, pre-participation ECG screening of collegiate athletes, cardiac arrests in marathon and half-marathons, and hypertension in isometric sporting disciplines. Dr. Kim has a strong clinical interest in sports cardiology as well, and will be developing a dedicated sports cardiology clinic at Emory St. Joseph’s Hospital.

Outside of cardiology, Dr. Kim enjoys running, golf, watching sports and spending time with his wife and two kids: son Benjamin (age 3) and daughter Isabella (age 1).

For information about cardiovascular services offered at Emory Healthcare, please visit www.emoryhealthcare.org/heart.

Emory Opens Heart Rhythm Clinics to Treat Growing Problem

arrhythmia screening centerEmory Healthcare is launching new screening centers across the Atlanta area to help diagnosis abnormal heart rhythms, or arrhythmias. An arrhythmia is a disorder of the heart that occurs when the body’s electrical impulses, which direct and regulate heartbeats, do not function properly and cause the heart to beat slowly (bradyarrhythmias), rapidly (tachyarrhythmias) or in an uncoordinated manner.

The new clinics will offer screening and, if needed, state-of-the-art care by some of the country’s leading arrhythmia experts. Clinics in Villa Rica, Conyers and Johns Creek are already operating, and a fourth location in Decatur will open later this summer.

Emory has been a pioneer in shaping arrhythmia treatment options, serving as primary and principal investigators for many national clinical trials. We rank among the world’s leaders in cardiac resynchronization therapy and have performed more cardiac ablation procedures than anyone in the Southeast.

According to the American Heart Association, atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is the most common chronic cardiac dysrhythmia and affects nearly 2.3 million people in the United States. The prevalence of arrhythmias is age-related and is expected to rise substantially as the baby boomer population continues to age.

Emory has one of the most wide-ranging and innovative treatment programs for heart rhythm disorders in the United States. Anyone who is experiencing palpitations, heart racing or other rhythm symptoms can visit one of our new screening locations to determine if their condition is serious and requires treatment by a specialist.

To learn more about arrhythmia screening, treatment and heart rhythm management services at Emory, please visit emoryhealthcare.org/arrhythmia.

About Dr. Hoskins

Michael Hoskins, MDMichael Hoskins, MD , is an assistant professor of medicine and electrophysiologist who practices primarily at Emory University Hospital. Dr. Hoskins received his medical degree from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, after which he completed his residency in internal medicine at Emory. He was chief resident in Internal Medicine from 2005 to 2006. He then completed fellowships in cardiology and electrophysiology, also at Emory, and has been practicing here since 2010.

About Emory’s Arrhythmia Center

Emory’s Arrhythmia Center is one of the most comprehensive and innovative clinics for heart rhythm disorders in the country. Our electrophysiologists have been pioneers in shaping treatment options for patients with arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, as well as for those with congestive heart disease. Our specialized electrophysiology (EP) labs host state-of-the-art equipment, including computerized three-dimensional mapping systems to assist with the ablation of complex arrhythmias, and an excimer laser system to perform pacemaker and defibrillator lead extractions.

Patients with devices, whether implanted at Emory or elsewhere, have access to Emory’s comprehensive follow-up care. Patients benefit from remote monitoring, quarterly atrial fibrillation support groups and 24-hour implantable cardiac device (ICD) and pacemaker monitoring services. Inpatient telemetry and coronary care units, as well as outpatient care and educational support of patients with pacemakers and ICDs, complete Emory’s comprehensive range of arrhythmia treatments and services.

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Miracle Mom

Mother’s Day had a whole new meaning for a local family this year.

As a soon-to-be second time mom, Edita Tracey was familiar with the aches and pains of pregnancy. But when a pressing pain in her back moved to her chest, she knew it was time to call 911. Edita was taken to a local hospital where doctors discovered that her aorta, the main blood vessel that pumps blood from her heart to her body, was bulging and tearing apart. Doctors sent the scans of Edita’s heart to Omar Lattouf, MD, a heart surgeon at Emory University Hospital Midtown, who confirmed the diagnosis. Edita was quickly airlifted to Emory University Hospital Midtown, where a team led by Dr. John Horton was prepped to deliver her baby by emergency c-section. Next, Dr. Lattouf and his team set to work on the nine hour surgery to repair Edita’s heart. Watch this Fox 5 piece to hear more of Edita’s amazing story.

Atlanta News, Weather, Traffic, and Sports | FOX 5

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Want a Heart Healthy Summer Dessert Recipe?

Raw Brownie RecipeThank you all for submitting recipes into the Emory Women’s Heart Center recipe contest! After consulting an Emory Healthcare nutritionist, we have selected LaVelle Johnson’s submission for the “OMG, It Can’t Be A Raw Brownie” Recipe as our favorite! LaVelle’s recipe was taken from the website PreventDisease.com. This recipe is amazing, but what is even more amazing about this delicious dessert – it’s heart healthy! Try out this new, fabulous brownie recipe to make a scrumptious dessert for your mother this Mother’s Day, and check out all of our great heart healthy recipes on our Pinterest page!

Brownie Base Ingredients

  • 1 cup Walnuts
  • 1 cup Medjool dates, pitted
  • ½ cup Raw Cocoa Powder
  • 1 Avocado

Icing Ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp Raw Honey
  • 1 Tbsp Maple Syrup
  • 3 Tbsp Cocoa Powder
  • 2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • Dash sea salt
  • Dash cinnamon

Directions

  1. Combine walnuts, dates, and the 1/3 cup of cocoa powder in a food processor (or high-end blender) and pulse mixture until it looks like potting soil. Pat this into an 20cm x 20cm (8inch x 8inch) pan.
  2. With a food processor (or high-end blender) blend the avocado, honey, maple syrup, second lot of cocoa, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon until smooth.
  3. Spread the icing over the brownie base, then put in the freezer for about an hour to set. No matter how long the brownies stay in the freezer, they never become rock-hard mostly because they won’t last that long.
  4. Enjoy!

*Original image and adapted recipe from wayfaringchocolate.com

Eating healthy can help prevent heart disease. So why not, eat your favorite foods with different healthy twist and try it out! Remember to schedule your heart screening today!

Heart Disease Screening

About Emory Women’s Heart Center

Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

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Emory Expansion Update: Emory General Cardiology is On the Move!

Emory Expansion UpdateTo provide a better patient care experience and align demand with available capacity, many Emory Clinic (TEC) and Emory Healthcare practices are relocating to redesigned clinical space and/or new locations, either temporarily or permanently. This is to accommodate both patients and our physicians more comfortably.

As of May 5th, the following General Cardiology providers will temporarily move down the street to the 4th floor of the 1525 Clifton Road clinic:

Beginning on Monday, May 5th, our patients will be seeing these providers at their new location.

The new address is:
The Emory Clinic at 1525 Clifton Road
1525 Clifton Road, NE
4th Floor
Atlanta, Georgia 30322

For more information, call 404-778-5299 or get details online, at: http://emoryhealthcare.org/expansion/moves.html

Emory Expansion Update: Emory Cardiovascular Specialists and the Emory Heart and Vascular Center at Saint Joseph’s are On the Move!

on-the-move-300x114To provide a better patient care experience and align demand with available capacity, many Emory Clinic and Emory Healthcare practices are relocating to redesigned clinical space and/or new locations. The new spaces will be more inviting for patients and more accommodating to the needs of our physicians as well.

As of April 28, 2014, Emory Cardiovascular Specialists and the Emory Heart and Vascular Center at Saint Joseph’s are moving to a new and shared location at 5671 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd, Suite 300, Atlanta, GA 30342, on the third floor.

Beginning April 28th, the patients of the following providers will be seen at the new location:

Emory Cardiovascular Specialists:

Emory Heart and Vascular Center at Saint Joseph’s:

For more information, call 404-778-6070 or get details online, at: http://emoryhealthcare.org/expansion/moves.html

How to Fall Asleep Faster!

Tips to Fall AsleepDo you have a hard time falling asleep? Women are busier than ever and as a result at the end of the day, many women have a hard time falling asleep. In an American Heart Association article, Emory Women’s Heart Center Clinical Director, Gina Lundberg, MD offers a few tips to help women get to sleep faster and stay asleep longer.

Here is a sneak peak at the some of her tips to help you fall asleep faster!

  • Exercise regularly
  • Avoid stimulants before bed
  • Establish a relaxation routine
  • Stay away from sleep medications

Emory and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Partner to Form Georgia’s First Comprehensive Congenital Heart Center

We are excited to announce the launch of the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia, collaboration between Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare. The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a comprehensive program for children and adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) that provides a continuum of lifesaving care from before birth through adulthood. It is the first comprehensive CHD program in the South and one of the largest in the country.

The program is led by Emory Healthcare cardiologist Wendy Book, MD, along with Robert Campbell, MD, chief of cardiac services and director of cardiology at Children’s Sibley Heart Center.

Not too long ago, most babies born with serious heart defects died in childhood. Thanks to advances in cardiac care, many patients with congenital heart defects are able to live well into adulthood. However, as adults, they need ongoing, specialized care that a practice like the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia can provide.

Even if a person born with a congenital heart defect is not experiencing symptoms, he or she should continue to receive regular, ongoing medical management. Recent research shows that 40% of people between 13 and 21 with congenital heart defects discontinue care for their heart condition. The newly formed Congenital Heart Center of Georgia will help patients make a seamless transition from pediatric to adult care, as well as make sure they benefit from the latest medical research and receive the most appropriate treatments available.

For more information about the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia, please visit www.congenitalheartgeorgia.org.

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Dr. Wendy BookAbout Wendy Book, MD
Dr. Book is a professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at Emory Healthcare. She specializes in cardiology, internal medicine and transplantation and is the director of the Emory Adult Congenital Heart (EACH) Center. Her areas of clinical interest include congenital heart disease, pregnancy in women with heart defects, heart failure and cardiac transplantation. Dr. Book has been practicing at Emory since 1998 and is highly regarded by her patients and colleagues.

Fish Oil Can Improve Heart & Brain Health

Fish Oil Supplements Heart HealthPhysicians and nutritionists advocate that individuals should eat 2 – 3.5 ounce servings of fish high in omega – 3s each week to improve heart and brain health. When eating this amount is not possible, many experts recommend substituting fish oil supplements. In fact, Emory Women’s Heart Center clinical director Gina Lundberg, MD recommends fish oil supplements for all patients after 50 years old.

A study has recently shown that women over the age of 50 who consumed the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids maintain better brain function than those who consumed lower levels. While fish oils have not been proven in research to reduce heart attack and strokes, the benefits of consuming fish oil are great. Foods (and supplements) that contain omega – 3 fatty acids (such as fish and fish oil) can reduce an individuals risk of abnormal heart rhythms such as arrhythmia and can delay plaque growth rate in the arteries. Further, omega – 3s and/or fish oil can also help lower blood pressure. A generic over the counter fish oil supplements can provide a similar benefit to the more expensive omega – 3 prescription fish oils at a lower cost, say Dr. Lundberg. Read the entire article published in USA Today to learn more as well as determine which fish oil supplements may be the best for your heart and brain health.

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About Gina Lundberg, MD
Dr. Gina LundbergDr. Lundberg, Emory Women’s Center Clinical Director, is a Preventive Cardiologist with The Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

She is a National AHA Spokesperson. Dr. Lundberg has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta from 2001 till 2007 and was on the Southeast Affiliate Board 2006-2007. She also served on the SEA Strategic Health Initiatives Committee to promote Go Red for Women. She has been involved in every program related to the Go Red for Women initiative for the metro Atlanta area since its development in 2003. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for North Fulton/ Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009 she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is a Circle of Red founding member and Core Vitae member for AHA. She also serves on the ACCF Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.
She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women on CNN and in USA Today. Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the Advisory Board for the Department of Women’s Health for the State of Georgia in 2007 till 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman Magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008 Atlanta Woman Magazine named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine. She has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and recertified in both in 2002. Dr. Lundberg has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career. Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in the metro Atlanta area.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.
Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

New Guidelines Suggest Risk Factors, Not Cholesterol Levels, Should Determine Cardiovascular Treatment Options

Statin Medications for patients with cardiovascular Risk FactorsThe American Heart Association (AHA) in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology recently released new, more aggressive cardiovascular treatment guidelines.  The new guidelines indicate that patients should be evaluated by their risk factors instead of a cholesterol number to determine if they should be prescribed medications.  Many patients who in the past would not have been prescribed statin medications will now be evaluated to determine if the medication is necessary.

Some of the risk factors physicians will take into consideration when evaluating a patient are:

  • Has the patient been diagnosed with heart disease?  This includes if the patient has ever had a heart attack or stroke.
    • If yes, your cholesterol should probably be managed with medication.
  • Does the patient have diabetes, type I or type II?
    • According to Emory Women’s Heart Center clinical director, Gina Lundberg, MD, “heart disease is the number one killer of all diabetics”.  Diabetics often need to manage their cholesterol with statin medications.
  • Does the patient have an LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) level of over 190.
    • According to the new cardiovascular treatment guidelines, if a patient is over 21 years old and has an LDL level above 190 he/she should be prescribed a statin medication.
  • Does the patient have a heart attack risk greater than 7.5%?

If a patient falls into any one of the risk factor categories above, they should be put on a statin according to the new guidelines. The new guidelines will hopefully prevent heart attacks and strokes in many patients who were previously not on statins to control cholesterol.

Related Resources:

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Gina Lundberg, MD

Dr. Gina LundbergGina Price Lundberg, MD FACC is the Director of the Heart Center for Women. She founded and directed The Women’s Heart Center, the first women’s cardiac prevention program in the state of Georgia in 1998.

She was named by Governor Sonny Perdue to the Advisory Board for Women’s Health, Georgia Department of Women’s Health, Department of Community Health for 2007-2008. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University and teaches cardiology fellows at Grady Hospital. She also teaches medical students from the Medical College of Georgia in preventive cardiology. She is a member of the American College of Cardiologist’s Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.

She has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta since 2001. She has been involved with the Go Red for Women campaign since it launched in 2004. She has been on the Southeast Affiliate for the AHA’s Strategic Initiative Committee representing Go Red for Women. She is national speaker for the American Heart Association. She has also been working with the national organization, Sister to Sister Foundation from 2004 till the present with their Atlanta program.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women in Glamour Magazine, MD News, the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, the Atlanta Business Chronicle, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and other magazines. She has been interviewed on numerous local news shows and many radio programs over the years. Dr. Lundberg has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in Atlanta, GA. She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in private practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and re-certified in both in 2002. She has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career.