Live Doctor Chats

Heart Disease is Not Just a “Man’s Disease”

Heart Disease PreventionHeart disease is often considered “a man’s disease” so you may be surprised to learn that over 8.6 million women worldwide die from heart disease each year. This accounts for over 1/3 of all deaths in women. In fact, heart disease kills 6 times more women each year compared to breast cancer.*

Interesting Facts on Heart Disease in Women Vs. Men:

  • Women often times wait longer than men to go to an emergency room for treatment while having a heart attack.
  • Physicians, not specifically trained in women and heart disease, some times have a harder time diagnosing heart attacks in women because of the differences in presentation of symptoms.
  • Women’s hearts respond better than men’s hearts to healthy changes in lifestyle.
  • Within a year after a heart attack, 38% of women will die, compared to 25% of men.
  • Women are more than 2 times more likely to die after bypass surgery then men.

Dr. Lundberg Shares Heart Healthy Holiday Recipes and Tips for the Whole Family!

Heart Healthy RecipesThank you for attending the live chat on Eating Heart Healthy during the holidays. We had some great questions and I hope you found the information valuable to ensure that you stay heart healthy this holiday season!

We had a couple questions about our favorite recipes that we were not able to respond to so we outlined two below that we love to prepare this time of year from the American Heart Association’s Healthy Recipes book.

Roasted Carrots, Beets, and Red Onion Wedges (Serves 4)

Ingredients

  • 2 medium beets (~5oz) peeled and cut into ½ inch wedges and patted dry with paper towels
  • 3 small carrots (~2oz each) cut crosswise into 2 inch pieces
  • 1 onion (medium)
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano, crumbled
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425
  • Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to keep it getting stained.
  • Lightly spray with foil and cooking spray
  • Put beets, carrots, and onion wedges on the foil.
  • Drizzle the oil and sprinkle the oregano and salt over the vegetables
  • Toss gently
  • Arrange the vegetables in a single layer so they don’t touch.
  • Bake 15 minutes. Stir. Bake another 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

Nutrition

  • 78 Calories
  • 2.5 grams total fat
  • 14 grams carbohydrates
  • 4 grams fiber
  • 9 grams sugar
  • 2 grams protein

Pork Medallions in Chunky Apple Cream Sauce (Serves 4)

Ingredients

  • 1 pound pork tenderloin
    • All visible fat discarded
    • Cut crosswise into 1 inch slices and each flattened to ½ inch
  • 2 teaspoons light tub margarine
  • 1 medium cooking apple, such as Granny Smith, peeled and chopped
  • 1/3 cup chopped onion
  • 2 medium garlic cloves
  • 5 ounces fat – free evaporated milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • Pinch of white pepper
  • Pinch of ground nutmeg
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley

Instructions

  • Turn stove on medium heat.
  • Spray a large skillet with cooking spray.
  • Arrange pork in a single layer in the skillet.
  • Cook for 2 minutes on each side.
  • Transfer to a larger plate.
  • Reduce heat to medium.
  • In same skillet, melt margarine.
  • Cook the apple and onion for 5 minutes until onion is tender, stir in garlic.
  • Cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly
  • Stir in remaining ingredients except parsley.
  • Bring to a simmer and simmer for 1 minute.
  • Stir in parsley.
  • Return the pork to the skillet and spoon the sauce over the pork.
  • Reduce heat and cook one additional minute.

Nutritional Information

  • 215 calories
  • 6.0 grams Fat
  • 28 grams Protein
  • 12 grams carbohydrates

Thank you again for joining us. Join us on Tuesday, February 11 at noon for a live chat with Emory Women’s Heart Center physician Alexis Cutchins about Treating and Preventing Heart Disease in Women. To register visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About Gina Lundberg, MD
Dr. Gina LundbergDr. Lundberg, Emory Women’s Center Clinical Director, is a Preventive Cardiologist with The Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

She is a National AHA Spokesperson. Dr. Lundberg has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta from 2001 till 2007 and was on the Southeast Affiliate Board 2006-2007. She also served on the SEA Strategic Health Initiatives Committee to promote Go Red for Women. She has been involved in every program related to the Go Red for Women initiative for the metro Atlanta area since its development in 2003. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for North Fulton/ Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009 she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is a Circle of Red founding member and Cor Vitae member for AHA. She also serves on the ACCF Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women on CNN and in USA Today. Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the Advisory Board for the Department of Women’s Health for the State of Georgia in 2007 till 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman Magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008 Atlanta Woman Magazine named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine. She has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and recertified in both in 2002. Dr. Lundberg has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career. Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in the metro Atlanta area.

About Stacy Jaskwhich, NP-C
Stacy Jaskwhich is a certified Nurse Practitioner with 20 years of medical experience, primarily in Cardiology. After graduating with her BSN from the University of South Carolina, she found her career and passion for cardiology while caring for patients in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care unit. After obtaining her Masters degree as a nurse practitioner from Clemson University, she expanded her career while practicing in the emergency room setting both in Greenville South Carolina as well as Northwestern Hospital in Chicago, Illinois.

Stacy is currently the Clinical Coordinator of Saint Joseph’s Heart Center for Women where she personally evaluates women through early screening and education. She also promotes research and community awareness of women and heart disease. Her favorite aspect of care is education, which is crucial in cardiac prevention. She also enjoys motivating women to make healthy life style changes. She is a Nurse Practitioner for The Emory Clinic as well and sees patients at the East Cobb location. She is a member of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nursing Association, the American College of Cardiology and is involved in many other local Advanced Provider Associations. She was a finalist in the 2012 March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Award. Favorite pastimes include running, biking, shopping, and being outside and of course, spending time with family and friends.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Resources:

Get Healthy Holiday Recipe Tips from Dr. Lundberg!

Healthy Holiday RecipesThere are so many temptations during the holiday season that cause many people to gain weight and develop unhealthy eating habits. Luckily, there are ways to enjoy most of your favorite foods but also ensure you are heart healthy. Join us on Tuesday, December 10 for a live web chat on Eating Heart Healthy During the Holidays. Gina Lundberg, MD, the Director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center, along with Stacy Jaskwhich, Nurse Practitioner specializing in women and heart disease will be giving us advice on how to prepare our menus during this festive time of year to ensure they are delicious but also healthy for your body and your heart. During the interactive chat, you will be able to ask direct questions to the leading authorities on heart disease in women as well as get the best information on how to eat heart healthy!

As a sneak peak for the types of information we will go over here are a few tips:

  • Eat turkey, instead of ham because ham is higher in sodium which can increase your blood pressure.
  • If you enjoy alcohol, limit your consumption to 1 to 2 glasses. Overindulging in alcohol increases the calorie consumption and also makes your more hungry.
  • Instead of making vegetable dishes with heavy cream and butter, try sautéing them. You will decrease the calories and really get more of the nutrients of the food out. For example, instead of your traditional green bean casserole, prepare fresh green beans, sautéed in olive oil and add a little lemon zest.
  • Drink lots of water. Before going back for your second helping of dessert, that third beer or that glass of eggnog, drink a glass of water to see if it craves the temptation to overindulge. You may think you are hungry when you are really thirsty.

Healthy Recipes Chat Sign Up
Join us on December 10 for more helpful tips to help ensure you stay heart healthy! To register for the chat visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats

About Gina Lundberg, MD

Dr. Gina LundbergGina Price Lundberg, MD FACC is the Director of the Heart Center for Women. She founded and directed The Women’s Heart Center, the first women’s cardiac prevention program in the state of Georgia in 1998.

She was named by Governor Sonny Perdue to the Advisory Board for Women’s Health, Georgia Department of Women’s Health, Department of Community Health for 2007-2008. She is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University and teaches cardiology fellows at Grady Hospital. She also teaches medical students from the Medical College of Georgia in preventive cardiology. She is a member of the American College of Cardiologist’s Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.

She has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta since 2001. She has been involved with the Go Red for Women campaign since it launched in 2004. She has been on the Southeast Affiliate for the AHA’s Strategic Initiative Committee representing Go Red for Women. She is national speaker for the American Heart Association. She has also been working with the national organization, Sister to Sister Foundation from 2004 till the present with their Atlanta program.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women in Glamour Magazine, MD News, the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia, the Atlanta Business Chronicle, the Atlanta Journal Constitution and other magazines. She has been interviewed on numerous local news shows and many radio programs over the years. Dr. Lundberg has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in Atlanta, GA. She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in private practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and re-certified in both in 2002. She has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career.
About Stacy Jaskwhich, NP-C
Stacy Jaskwhich is a certified Nurse Practitioner with 20 years of medical experience, primarily in Cardiology. After graduating with her BSN from the University of South Carolina, she found her career and passion for cardiology while caring for patients in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care unit. After obtaining her Masters degree as a nurse practitioner from Clemson University, she expanded her career while practicing in the emergency room setting both in Greenville South Carolina as well as Northwestern Hospital in Chicago, Illinois.

Stacy is currently the Clinical Coordinator of Saint Joseph’s Heart Center for Women where she personally evaluates women through early screening and education. She also promotes research and community awareness of women and heart disease. Her favorite aspect of care is education, which is crucial in cardiac prevention. She also enjoys motivating women to make healthy life style changes. She is a Nurse Practitioner for The Emory Clinic as well and sees patients at the East Cobb location. She is a member of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nursing Association, the American College of Cardiology and is involved in many other local Advanced Provider Associations. She was a finalist in the 2012 March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Award. Favorite pastimes include running, biking, shopping, and being outside and of course, spending time with family and friends.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Resources:

Understanding Heart Disease in Women

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Dr. Farheen Shirazi, Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist, recently conducted a live web chat on the topic of women and heart disease. During the chat, Dr. Shirazi provided participants with information ranging from how women can prevent heart disease to the importance of getting treatment right away, and details on the latest research underway to combat heart disease in women.

One of our attendees in Tuesday’s chat asked Dr. Shirazi, “What is the best diet for patients with heart disease?” Dr. Shirazi noted that the most effective diet will depend on each person’s specific risk factors for heart disease, but in general, the most recent evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet is heart healthy. Dr. Shirazi explained that the Mediterranean Diet is rich in lean protein (poultry), good fats (olive oil) and omega-3s (fatty fish), and low in saturated fats and bad carbohydrates. And like any healthy diet, the Mediterranean Diet is low in sodium and loaded with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Another great question fielded by Dr. Shirazi in Tuesday’s live chat was related to symptoms and warning signs of heart disease, “I have read that symptoms of coronary heart disease are different in woman than in men, but when symptoms present, at what point should you seek medical attention? I sometimes feel chest discomfort, even sharp pains, but how will I know if it’s more serious than say stress for example?” Dr. Shirazi says patients should trust their instincts if something doesn’t “feel right,” in which case, Dr. Shirazi recommends seeing a medical professional. “A provider will be able to evaluate your symptoms and do appropriate screening. If you’re having any symptoms such as: chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations, excessive fatigue, dizziness, loss of consciousness, or abdominal pain (to list a few), you should see your primary care physician. Your cardiologist will then be able to further assess your risk for heart disease,” she says.

In addition to the questions above, Dr. Shirazi answered questions related to cholesterol levels, hormone replacement therapy, and several other topics specific to heart disease in women. Most importantly, though, she reminded participants to take action immediately if they are at risk for, or experiencing symptoms of, heart disease.

For more information, check out the Women and Heart Disease chat transcript.

Related Resources:

Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Young Athletes

Cardiac arrest, once thought to be rare in young athletes, is becoming increasingly prevalent.  According to some experts, a high school student dies of cardiac arrest as often as every three days. A young person’s cardiac arrest could stem from a structural defect in the heart, or a problem with its electrical circuitry. But the most frequent cause of cardiac arrest among young athletes—making up nearly 40 percent of all cases— is the Hypertrophic Cadriomyopathy (HCM) which is a thickening of the heart muscle.

Fortunately, there are warning signs of both hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrest. To ensure good health during healthy competition among young athletes, parents and guardians need to be aware of the symptoms of both.

Join Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist and director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy clinic, B. Robinson Williams III, MD  onThursday, August 9, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive online Q & A web chat on the topic of sudden cardiac arrest in young athletes. Dr. Williams will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about cardiac arrest in young athletes including causes, symptoms, and how to quickly treat, if it occurs.

You can register online for the live chat today!

Related Resources

Heart Disease in Young Women

Young Women Heart Disease Web ChatDid you know that heart disease is the number one killer of women? And, what is more alarming is that heart disease affects women of all ages, not just older women. It is very important to know that younger women are more likely to fail to recognize their risk. According to researchers at the American Heart Association, about 16,000 women under age 55 die of heart disease each year, which is close to the same number of women of the same age who die of breast cancer. So, women of all ages should listen up: learn the symptoms of a heart attack so you are not one of the statistics!

If you are young women and have a history of heart disease in your family, have risk factors that could lead to heart disease or are concerned about your chances of developing heart disease, join us on Tuesday, May 15, 2012, at 12:30 p.m. EST for a live chat on Heart Disease in Young Women.

Emory Heart & Vascular Center cardiologist Susmita Parashar, MD, will answer questions about heart disease in young women including:

  • Why it is crucial for women to know the symptoms of heart disease in women
  • What young women can do to prevent heart disease
  • The importance of getting treatment right away
  • The research underway to combat heart disease in women

To register, visit Emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

Don’t Let Your Stress Levels Stress Your Heart

Stress & Heart Disease Chat Sign Up

Join Emory Heart & Vascular Center preventive heart disease specialist Susmita Parashar, MD to learn about how stress can contribute to heart disease. Dr. Parashar will participate in a free live web chat on Tuesday, February 28, 2012 and will be available to provide information linking stress to heart disease as well as answer questions on how to best balance your life to reduce stress. The chat will begin at 12:30pm EST.

Register for the Stress & Heart Disease Web Chat: UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

 


About Dr. Susmita Parashar

Dr. Susmita Parashar

Dr. Susmita Parashar is a Board certified cardiologist at the Emory Heart and Vascular Center and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) at Emory University School of Medicine. Prior to joining as faculty in the Division of Cardiology, Dr Parashar was Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Medicine at Emory for 8 years. She applies her experience as a Board certified internist in providing a holistic care to patients. She was awarded the American Heart Association (AHA) Trudy Bush Fellowship for Cardiovascular Research in Women’s Health Award to recognize outstanding work in the area of women’s health and cardiovascular disease and Emory Department of Medicine Early Career Faculty Research Award for Clinical Research.

Dr Parashar completed her residency in Internal Medicine at Medical College of Georgia, Augusta and Cardiology fellowship at Emory University. She completed her Master of Public Health and a Master of Science from Emory in 2005. A passionate clinician-researcher and educator, she trains medical students, residents and cardiology fellows. In addition, she conducts clinical research. Dr Parashar’s clinical and research focus is in preventive cardiology with a focus on women and cardiovascular diseases.

She has received several grants and awards from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and the AHA to conduct research on women and heart disease. She has served as Emory principal investigator for large NIH funded clinical research for heart attack patients. She was also invited to participate as a co-investigator for the NIH funded Cardiovascular Health Study for older adults. She has presented her work in national and international scientific meetings, including the AHA Annual Session, AHA Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke, American College of Cardiology Annual Session, Society of General Internal Medicine and International Congress of Coronary Heart Disease.

Dr. Parashar has authored/coauthored over 60 peer-reviewed publications, including invited textbook chapters, manuscripts, abstracts and review articles. Her work has been published in such prestigious journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine and Circulation, and highlighted by the Nature and national media such as CNN, CBS and NPR news.

She believes in family-career balance and applies her experience as a mother of two young children and wife to her work.


Celebrate Heart Month with this Tasty Pasta Salad Recipe!

Thank you to those who attended our  live web chat on Nutrition for the Heart! We had an excellent discussion and thank Emory Heart & Vascular Center Registered Dietician Cheryl A. Williams, RD, LD (pictured below) for her insight on this important topic!   If you were not able to attend the live chat, you can view the transcript from this chat and others using the “Past Web Chats” link in the top navigation bar.

Cheryl Williams

We would like to clarify a question posed in the chat regarding the amount of fish that is healthy for your heart.  The guidelines for fish consumption are 2 servings of fatty fish, salmon, trout, mackerel etc.,  per week for heart health. There are no separate guidelines for white-flesh fish  such a tilapia.  For people who do not like fatty fish they can have white-flesh fish instead (if not fried), as it generally has less saturated fat then red meat and poultry.

Eating fish is healthy and tasty too!  Cheryl provided us with this delicious Salmon Pasta Salad recipe.  Try it! I am sure you will like it and your heart will too!

Fresh Veggie & Salmon Whole Wheat Pasta Salad

Makes 16 servings (servings size: 1 cup)

Healthy Pasta Salad Recipe♥ 16 ounces whole wheat pasta (penne, bowtie, etc.)
♥ Three 6-7 ounce cans of Wild Alaska Pink Salmon (sockeye salmon) flaked
♥ 8 cups fresh whole spinach leaf (10 ounce bag)
♥ 2 cups halved grape/cherry tomatoes 1 cup chopped walnuts

Raspberry Citrus Vinaigrette

♥ 1/3 cup canola oil
♥ 1/2 cup orange juice (about 1 orange)
♥ 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
♥ 1/4 cup fresh or frozen raspberries
♥ 4 tbsp fresh oregano or basil or  4 tsp dried oregano or basil leaves
♥ 2 garlic minced garlic cloves
♥ ½ tsp salt
♥ 2 tbsp ground black pepper

Directions:

  1. Cook pasta according to package; drain pasta and set aside in strainer
  2. Open cans of salmon, cover with can lid and run under water faucet for 1 minute
  3. In large salad bowl combine pasta, salmon, tomatoes, spinach & chopped walnuts
  4. Prepare vinaigrette:In blender or food processor combine citrus juices, raspberries, oregano, garlic, salt and pepper, whirl until well blended; add canola oil slowly until well blended
  5. Pour vinaigrette over salad and toss.
  6. Refrigerate salad for at least 30 minutes before serving.

Nutrition Analysis (per serving)

  • 252 Calories
  • 12 gramsTotal Fat
  • 1 grams Saturated Fat
  • 0 grams Trans Fat
  • 23 milligrams Cholesterol
  • 235 milligrams Sodium
  • 25 grams Carbohydrates
  • 4 grams Fiber
  • Sugars 1 gram
  • Protein 15
  • Dietary Exchanges: 1.5 starches, 1/2 vegetable, 2 meats, 2 fats\

Related Resources:

Did you Know Heart Disease is the Number 1 Killer of Women?

And…heart disease kills more women than the next 5 highest causes COMBINED!  In fact, 40,000 more women than men die of heart disease each year.

Gina Lundberg, MD, cardiologist at Saint Joseph’s Hospital who specializes in heart disease in women gives tips of how you can lower your risk for heart disease and protect yourself!


Don’t forget to join Emory Healthcare nutritionist Cheryl Williams, RD, LD  on Thursday, February 9 for a live chat to learn some ideas for heart healthy recipes. To register visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats!

Related Resources:

Celebrate Heart Month by Joining Our Top Heart Healthy Foods Chat!

Top Heart Healthy Foods ChatJoin Emory Heart & Vascular Center nutritionist Cheryl A. Williams, RD, LD on Thursday, February 9 at 12:30 for a live web chat titled “Top Heart Healthy Foods”. She will be available to answer questions about what the best food choices are for your heart, share new recipe ideas, as well as provide ideas for your favorite current recipes that will help keep your heart healthy.

Sign up for the Top Heart Healthy Foods Chat here: UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

We look forward to helping facilitate a dialog that builds awareness around the importance of prioritizing a heart healthy diet and taking control of your heart health! See you there!

About:  Cheryl Williams is a registered dietitian (RD) specializing in the nutritional management of a variety of chronic conditions including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity. In her current position at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center, Cheryl provides nutrition therapy, wellness coaching, monthly nutrition seminars and healthy cooking demonstrations.