Live Doctor Chats

What Causes Varicose Veins or Spider Veins? – Join Us for a Live Web Chat!

Varicose Spider VeinsWhile it’s important to look your best, it’s also important to feel your best. Males, females, the young and the old. Varicose veins can affect anyone. So have you ever wondered what causes those unsightly bulges and twists to appear on your legs?

Join us on Tuesday, April 14, at 12:00 p.m. for an interactive web chat discussing the causes of varicose veins and spider veins. Dr. Rheudasil will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics, including the causes, prevention and treatment of varicose veins.

During this interactive web chat, you’ll be able to ask questions and get real-time answers from our Emory Healthcare professional.

Register now for our April 14 chat at emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About Dr. Rheudasil

Mark Rheudasil, MDMark Rheudasil, MD, graduated magna cum laude from Abilene Christian University in Texas and he earned his medical degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas in 1983. He completed a general surgery internship and residency program at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. Rheudasil also completed a fellowship in vascular surgery at Emory University in 1989.

Dr. Rheudasil is a diplomat of the American Board of Surgery and is a board certified vascular surgeon. He is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the International Society for Cardiovascular and Endovascular Surgery, and the North American chapter of the International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery. He is also a member of the Peripheral Vascular Surgery Society, the Southern Association for Vascular Surgery, the Emory Association of Vascular Surgery, the Atlanta Vascular Society, and the Georgia Surgical Society. He is also a member of the Medical Association of Georgia, the Medical Association of Atlanta, and the Atlanta Clinical Society. He is also certified as a Registered Vascular Technologist.

Dr. Rheudasil has published articles in several medical journals including The Journal of Vascular Surgery, American Surgeon and The Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia. He has lectured at the regional and national level on a variety of topics including current reviews of vascular surgery.

What’s Causing Your Leg Pain? – Join Us for a Live Web Chat!

PAD Live ChatPeripheral artery disease (PAD) is a commonly undiagnosed disease affecting about 8.5 million Americans. Symptoms vary from cramping in the lower extremities, as well as pain or tiredness in leg or hip muscles. According to the American Heart Association, many people mistake the symptoms of PAD for something else, which is why it can easily go undiagnosed. Having the correct diagnosis is important because people with PAD are at a higher risk of heart attack or stroke, and if untreated, PAD can lead to gangrene and amputation.

Many people think their leg pain is due to arthritis, sciatica or just a part of aging. People with diabetes may even confuse PAD pain with a neuropathy, a common diabetic symptom that causes a burning or painful discomfort of the feet or thighs. It is important to know that, while PAD is potentially life-threatening, it can be managed or even reversed with proper care. If you’re having any kind of recurring pain, talk to your healthcare professional.

Join me on Tuesday, March 24, at 12:00 p.m. for an interactive web chat entitled “What’s causing your leg pain?” Dr. Robertson will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about PAD, including symptoms, diagnosis and misdiagnosis, prevention and treatment.

During this interactive web chat, you’ll be able to ask questions and get real-time answers from our Emory Healthcare professional.

Register now for our March 24 chat at emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About Dr. Robertson

Gregory Robertson, MDGreg Robertson, MD, is the chief of the Emory Heart and Vascular Clinic at Johns Creek. At the Emory Johns Creek Hospital he is chief of cardiology and the medical director of the Cardiac Catheterization laboratory and interventional program. He is board certified in Vascular Medicine, Endovascular Medicine, Interventional Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine.

Dr. Robertson’s research has had a focus on the development of new technologies and techniques to treat blocked leg arteries in patients with peripheral arterial disease, helping patients walk farther and prevent limb amputation in diabetic patients. While in the San Francisco Bay Area for 16 years before moving to Atlanta, he practiced with the well-known medical device inventor Dr. John Simpson, whose development teams invented the atherectomy procedure and the first percutaneous arterial closure device. Atherectomy is a procedure which allows the physician to remove plaque in blocked arteries without major surgery. His newest project is with Dr. Simpson’s invention of the Avinger Ocelot and Pantheris devices which open blocked arteries using smart laser imaging.

Dr. Robertson’s clinical expertise is oriented on performing minimally-invasive procedures to avoid major surgery. He has developed many of the vascular programs at the new Emory Johns Creek Hospital including 1) carotid artery stenting, 2) percutaneous repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms and 3) limb preservation for those at risk of limb amputation. He has also developed the cardiac intervention programs for emergency heart attack victims and elective procedures to include PCI and PFO/ASD closure.

Takeaways from Dr. Hoskins’ Arrhythmia Live Chat

arryhthmia live chatThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, February 24 for the live online chat entitled “Irregular Heart Beat: Is it normal?,” hosted by Emory Arrhythmia Center physician Michael Hoskins, MD.

Because arrhythmias are common in young- and middle-aged adults, it is important to understand the symptoms. Some arrhythmias are relatively harmless, but others can be fatal if not treated. Dr. Hoskins provided answers to questions about the diagnosis and treatment of heart rhythm disorders, as well as tips of how to deal with an episode of irregular heart beats. Check out the conversation by viewing the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: I have observed that during some of these episodes my blood pressure is really low and it has been recognized that sometimes my oxygen level is low during the night. could this be causing my arrhythmias? I do have trouble breathing through a deviated nostril.

Michael Hoskins, MDDr. Hoskins: A common condition associated with arrhythmias is sleep apnea. This can be caused by a deviated septum and can cause difficulty breathing and low oxygen levels at night. It sounds like you may benefit from a sleep apnea evaluation.

 

Question: I have been advised that I am a candidate for ablation for my a-fib. What are the options offered by Emory and how do I become educated about the options?

Michael Hoskins, MDDr. Hoskins: Ablation and medications are both treatment options for atrial fibrillation. It’s important to tailor that therapy to each specific patient. I would encourage you to schedule a visit with one of our arrhythmia specialists.

 

Question: Most irregular heartbeats do resolve within a few beats. If they don’t resolve for a longer period of time, a person would go to the emergency room, right? Or should that person wait for other symptoms, (dizziness or something else).

Michael Hoskins, MDDr. Hoskins: Some arrhythmias are more dangerous than others. We often encourage patients to call their doctor before going to the ER if it has been determined that their particular arrhythmia isn’t life threatening. However, certain arrhythmias need immediate attention and are best handled in the ER. If your arrhythmia is accompanied by severe chest pain, shortness of breath or loss of consciousness, you should consider calling 9-1-1.

If you missed this chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the web transcript. For more information or to request an appointment to be screened for a heart rhythm disorder, visit emoryhealthcare.org/arrhythmia.

If you have additional questions for Dr. Hoskins, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

 

Irregular Heartbeat: Is it Normal? – Join Us for a Live Web Chat!

Arrhythmia live chatHave you ever felt like your heart skipped a beat? Do you experience palpitations or “fluttering?” This is a symptom of a very common rhythm disorder called an arrhythmia. Arrhythmias are common in young- and middle-aged adults. Some arrhythmias are relatively harmless, but others can be fatal if not treated. Nearly 1,000,000 people are hospitalized for an arrhythmia each year, and some arrhythmias, such as Atrial Fibrillation, are extremely common and affect over 2,500,000 million Americans.

Other symptoms of arrhythmia include:

  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Lightheadedness
  • Fainting (syncope) or near-fainting spells
  • Rapid heartbeat or pounding
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • In extreme cases, collapse and sudden cardiac arrest

Join me on Tuesday, February 24, at 12:00 p.m. for a live, interactive web chat on the topic of “Living With and Treating Arrhythmias.” Dr. Michael Hoskins will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about arrhythmias, including symptoms, diagnosis, prevention and treatment.

During this interactive web chat, you’ll be able to ask questions and get real-time answers from our Emory Healthcare professional.

Register now for our February 24 chat at emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About Dr. Hoskins

Michael Hoskins, MDMichael Hoskins, MD , is an assistant professor of medicine and electrophysiologist who practices primarily at Emory University Hospital. Dr. Hoskins received his medical degree from the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, after which he completed his residency in internal medicine at Emory. He was chief resident in Internal Medicine from 2005 to 2006. He then completed fellowships in cardiology and electrophysiology, also at Emory, and has been practicing here since 2010. He specializes in treating cardiac arrhythmias, focusing on ablation of arrhythmias and implantation and management of pacemakers and defibrillators.

About Emory’s Arrhythmia Center

Emory’s Arrhythmia Center is one of the most comprehensive and innovative clinics for heart rhythm disorders in the country. Our electrophysiologists have been pioneers in shaping treatment options for patients with arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, as well as for those with congestive heart disease. Our specialized electrophysiology (EP) labs host state-of-the-art equipment, including computerized three-dimensional mapping systems to assist with the ablation of complex arrhythmias, and an excimer laser system to perform pacemaker and defibrillator lead extractions.

Patients with devices, whether implanted at Emory or elsewhere, have access to Emory’s comprehensive follow-up care. Patients benefit from remote monitoring, quarterly atrial fibrillation support groups and 24-hour implantable cardiac device (ICD) and pacemaker monitoring services. Inpatient telemetry and coronary care units, as well as outpatient care and educational support of patients with pacemakers and ICDs, complete Emory’s comprehensive range of arrhythmia treatments and services.

Takeaways from Dr. Lundberg’s Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating Chat

heart health holiday eatingThanks to everyone who joined us Tuesday, December 9, for our live online chat on “Heart-Healthy Holiday Eating,” hosted by the Clinical Director of the Emory Women’s Heart Center, Gina Lundberg, MD.

With holiday parties in full swing, many of us are staying busy and eating on the go or overindulging in sweet party treats. Dr. Lundberg discussed heart-healthy tips and recipes, as well as answered your questions on how to make smart food and drink decisions.

See all of Dr. Lundberg’s answers by checking out the chat transcript! Here are just a few highlights from the chat:

Question: What are some entrée or side substitutions I can make without losing the “holiday” touch?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: Turkey and ham are both lean meat, so entrees aren’t usually the problem The side dishes are usually where we run into trouble. Feel free to have your ham, turkey, and even lean pork and beef, but try to avoid the potato-heavy, cheesy side dishes.

 

Question: I crave sweets every day. What can I do to satisfy my cravings without reaching for the chocolate?

Gina Lundberg, MDDr. Lundberg: The more sugar you eat, the more you crave sugar. If you stick to a diet that is higher in protein, you’ll be more satisfied and won’t crave sugar as much. Eating healthier snacks more frequently (fruit, veggies, raw nuts) will stop you from being hungry and eating the wrong things.

 

BONUS: Dr. Lundberg’s Top 10 Tips to Stay Healthy During the Holidays

holiday-health-tips

If you missed out on this live chat, be sure to check out the full list of questions and answers on the chat transcript. If you have additional questions for Dr. Lundberg, feel free to leave a comment in our comments area below.

 

Takeaways from Dr. Murphy and Dr. Halkos’ Chat on Mitral Valve Disease

Mitral Valve Disease Q&AThank you for attending the live chat on mitral valve disease on Tuesday, February 25. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here).

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Jean -What precautions need to be taken when diagnosed?

halkos-michael

Dr. Halkos: 

Jean – In general, patients with mitral valve disorders need to take special precautions against infection during certain procedures, such as dental cleaning.  It is important to let providers that take care of you know you have mitral valve disorders when seeing them so they can take the necessary precautions.

Takeaways from Dr. Cutchins’ Chat on Heart Disease in Women

Heart Disease PreventionThank you for attending the live chat on women and heart disease on Tuesday, February 11. We had a great discussion, so thank you all who posed questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here). We hope this means the word is spreading that heart disease is the number one killer of women and in many cases it is preventable if we take action.

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Kim – Do you have advice for how we handle ER/EC encounters and successfully get the ER/EC doc/ staff to acknowledge active Heart Disease in the pre-menopausal woman?? With newer diagnoses such as coronary endothelial dysfunction/severe coronary vasospasms for me diastolic CHF due to the preceding perhaps advice on how to navigate our local healthcare systems when we cannot get to Emory. Are these disorders and often the testing that goes along with them that is often NORMAL, are they becoming more well-versed to the medical establishments or not?

Dr. Alexis Cutchins

Dr. Cutchins: 

Kim – This is a very good question but not so easy to answer. The Emory Women’s Heart Center is working hard on trying to educate physicians in our communities about heart disease in women. We are stressing to these physicians that heart disease can exist with negative ED test results. That said, when a woman presents to the ED with symptoms the physicians are doing their best to make sure there is nothing acute or life threatening going on with the patient. If all ED tests are normal and the patient is still concerned, the patient should follow up afterwards with a cardiologist who specializes in women with heart disease. All of the diseases you have described above are real and should be taken seriously. We have multiple treatment options for patients who fall into those categories. To find out more information you can visit emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart.

Tonia – Recently diagnosed with CHF- should I be concerned about my heart murmur?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins: 

Hi Tonia. Although I can’t speak to your condition without seeing you in person, I can tell you that in general, it’s not uncommon for patients with CHF (congestive heart failure) to have heart murmurs. Typically, I recommend patients speak to their physician and ask their physician(s) to perform an echo (heart ultrasound) if it has not been imaged already.

A heart murmur could be caused from any number of factors including:

  • Increased flow across a heart valve
  • Leaking of a heart valve
  • Tightening of a heart valve.

Stay in close connection with your cardiologist to evaluate your case. If you need a cardiologist who specializes in heart disease and women, you can choose an Emory Women’s Heart Center physician by calling 404-778-7777 or visiting emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart.

Flora – I have atrial fibrillation (AF) will I get better?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins:

Hi Flora. I can’t speak to your condition without seeing you in person, but for many people, atrial fibrillation can get better. Some people have atrial fibrillation that comes and goes and some are in AF all the time. Typically, depending on a patient’s symptoms while they are in AF there are a variety of treatment options available ranging from medications to surgical procedures. How an individual feels with the diagnosis can vary so it is important to visit your cardiologist and discuss your particular case in person.

Imelda – Is taking baby aspirin now is safe?

Dr. Alexis Cutchins

Dr. Cutchins:

Like most medication, taking baby aspirin can provide side effects and is risky in some populations of people. In some cases it can cause gastrointestinal bleeding. In certain populations, such as women over the age of 65, the benefit outweighs the risk. For women over 65 who are at risk for heart disease and have well controlled blood pressure, a baby aspirin is recommended to decrease the risk of stroke and heart attack. Also women of any age with diabetes or diagnosed coronary artery disease, who do not have a contraindication, typically should take a daily baby aspirin. We always recommend to patients that they consult with their physician prior to taking any new medication to make sure it does not interact with any other medication the patient may be taking.

Imelda – Is fish oil and vitamin E is good for the heart?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins:

Fish oil is useful for women with high cholesterol or triglyceride levels. The recommendation is to take 1800mg/day of “EPA” which should be found on the bottle. Also fatty fish such as salmon, is a great source of Omega-3 fatty acids that are protective. For more information on how fish oil can improve your heart & brain health please visit this blog on fish oil, posted last week on the Emory Advancing your Health Blog.

I am not as familiar with the benefits and risks associated with taking Vitamin E but it is not specifically recommended for women by the American Heart Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Dr. Cutchins
Alexis Cutchins, MD is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

Dr. Cutchins has published several different articles on adipose tissue distribution and obesity in journals such as Circulation Research, Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Stroke and has a special interest in the effects of adipose tissue distribution on the heart.

Dr. Cutchins is board certified in Internal Medicine (2007) and Cardiovascular Diseases (2012). She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.
Dr. Cutchins sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Saint Joseph’s.

She enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband, their three daughters and their dog. She loves to cook and ride horses.

Related Links

If I’ve Been Diagnosed with a Leaky Heart Valve, What happens next?

Mitral Valve Disease Q&ADid you know that the most common type of heart valve disorder is mitral regurgitation, sometimes called a “leaky valve”? This happens when the valve between the upper and lower chambers on the left side of the heart do not close properly, which can cause a decrease in blood flow to the rest of the body.

One cause of mitral regurgitation can be mitral valve prolapse, which may affect people without always causing symptoms. This condition may also be hereditary and is sometimes handed down through families.

Join Emory Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery Douglas Murphy, MD, and Asst. Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Michael Halkos, MD, on Tuesday, Feb. 25, for an online web chat to discuss mitral valve disease. They will be available to answer questions such as:

  • What is mitral valve prolapse and regurgitation?
  • Do they always require treatment?
  • If so, what are my options?

Mitral Valve Disease Chat

Heart Disease is Not Just a “Man’s Disease”

Heart Disease PreventionHeart disease is often considered “a man’s disease” so you may be surprised to learn that over 8.6 million women worldwide die from heart disease each year. This accounts for over 1/3 of all deaths in women. In fact, heart disease kills 6 times more women each year compared to breast cancer.*

Interesting Facts on Heart Disease in Women Vs. Men:

  • Women often times wait longer than men to go to an emergency room for treatment while having a heart attack.
  • Physicians, not specifically trained in women and heart disease, some times have a harder time diagnosing heart attacks in women because of the differences in presentation of symptoms.
  • Women’s hearts respond better than men’s hearts to healthy changes in lifestyle.
  • Within a year after a heart attack, 38% of women will die, compared to 25% of men.
  • Women are more than 2 times more likely to die after bypass surgery then men.

Dr. Lundberg Shares Heart Healthy Holiday Recipes and Tips for the Whole Family!

Heart Healthy RecipesThank you for attending the live chat on Eating Heart Healthy during the holidays. We had some great questions and I hope you found the information valuable to ensure that you stay heart healthy this holiday season!

We had a couple questions about our favorite recipes that we were not able to respond to so we outlined two below that we love to prepare this time of year from the American Heart Association’s Healthy Recipes book.

Roasted Carrots, Beets, and Red Onion Wedges (Serves 4)

Ingredients

  • 2 medium beets (~5oz) peeled and cut into ½ inch wedges and patted dry with paper towels
  • 3 small carrots (~2oz each) cut crosswise into 2 inch pieces
  • 1 onion (medium)
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano, crumbled
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425
  • Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to keep it getting stained.
  • Lightly spray with foil and cooking spray
  • Put beets, carrots, and onion wedges on the foil.
  • Drizzle the oil and sprinkle the oregano and salt over the vegetables
  • Toss gently
  • Arrange the vegetables in a single layer so they don’t touch.
  • Bake 15 minutes. Stir. Bake another 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

Nutrition

  • 78 Calories
  • 2.5 grams total fat
  • 14 grams carbohydrates
  • 4 grams fiber
  • 9 grams sugar
  • 2 grams protein

Pork Medallions in Chunky Apple Cream Sauce (Serves 4)

Ingredients

  • 1 pound pork tenderloin
    • All visible fat discarded
    • Cut crosswise into 1 inch slices and each flattened to ½ inch
  • 2 teaspoons light tub margarine
  • 1 medium cooking apple, such as Granny Smith, peeled and chopped
  • 1/3 cup chopped onion
  • 2 medium garlic cloves
  • 5 ounces fat – free evaporated milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • Pinch of white pepper
  • Pinch of ground nutmeg
  • 2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley

Instructions

  • Turn stove on medium heat.
  • Spray a large skillet with cooking spray.
  • Arrange pork in a single layer in the skillet.
  • Cook for 2 minutes on each side.
  • Transfer to a larger plate.
  • Reduce heat to medium.
  • In same skillet, melt margarine.
  • Cook the apple and onion for 5 minutes until onion is tender, stir in garlic.
  • Cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly
  • Stir in remaining ingredients except parsley.
  • Bring to a simmer and simmer for 1 minute.
  • Stir in parsley.
  • Return the pork to the skillet and spoon the sauce over the pork.
  • Reduce heat and cook one additional minute.

Nutritional Information

  • 215 calories
  • 6.0 grams Fat
  • 28 grams Protein
  • 12 grams carbohydrates

Thank you again for joining us. Join us on Tuesday, February 11 at noon for a live chat with Emory Women’s Heart Center physician Alexis Cutchins about Treating and Preventing Heart Disease in Women. To register visit emoryhealthcare.org/mdchats.

About Gina Lundberg, MD
Dr. Gina LundbergDr. Lundberg, Emory Women’s Center Clinical Director, is a Preventive Cardiologist with The Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

She is a National AHA Spokesperson. Dr. Lundberg has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta from 2001 till 2007 and was on the Southeast Affiliate Board 2006-2007. She also served on the SEA Strategic Health Initiatives Committee to promote Go Red for Women. She has been involved in every program related to the Go Red for Women initiative for the metro Atlanta area since its development in 2003. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for North Fulton/ Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009 she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is a Circle of Red founding member and Cor Vitae member for AHA. She also serves on the ACCF Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.

She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women on CNN and in USA Today. Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the Advisory Board for the Department of Women’s Health for the State of Georgia in 2007 till 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman Magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008 Atlanta Woman Magazine named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine. She has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and recertified in both in 2002. Dr. Lundberg has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career. Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in the metro Atlanta area.

About Stacy Jaskwhich, NP-C
Stacy Jaskwhich is a certified Nurse Practitioner with 20 years of medical experience, primarily in Cardiology. After graduating with her BSN from the University of South Carolina, she found her career and passion for cardiology while caring for patients in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care unit. After obtaining her Masters degree as a nurse practitioner from Clemson University, she expanded her career while practicing in the emergency room setting both in Greenville South Carolina as well as Northwestern Hospital in Chicago, Illinois.

Stacy is currently the Clinical Coordinator of Saint Joseph’s Heart Center for Women where she personally evaluates women through early screening and education. She also promotes research and community awareness of women and heart disease. Her favorite aspect of care is education, which is crucial in cardiac prevention. She also enjoys motivating women to make healthy life style changes. She is a Nurse Practitioner for The Emory Clinic as well and sees patients at the East Cobb location. She is a member of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nursing Association, the American College of Cardiology and is involved in many other local Advanced Provider Associations. She was a finalist in the 2012 March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Award. Favorite pastimes include running, biking, shopping, and being outside and of course, spending time with family and friends.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.

Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

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