Heart Health

Reversing Heart Disease – Is it Possible?

Did you know that in women, heart disease takes more lives than every type of cancer combined? The good news is that in the last 20 years deaths due to heart disease have declined thanks to advances in medicine as well as education of the population.

In the past, heart disease was thought to be just a “man’s disease,” but surprisingly more women currently die from cardiovascular disease than men. Therefore, it is important to take action to prevent and potentially reverse heart disease. If you think you may be at risk, schedule your heart disease screening today.

There are various things you can do to reverse heart disease and if action is taken quickly, heart disease symptoms can be reduced in a very short period of time.

  • Evaluate your diet to determine if the foods you are eating are causing plaque build up. If you stop consuming foods that are contributing the plaque build up, your arteries will have a better chance to recover. A plant based diet incorporating fruits, vegetables and whole grains can likely help to reverse heart disease.
    • If this diet is too restrictive, or you are just looking to prevent heart disease, the USDA ‘s new “MyPlate” program is a good option. It suggests filling half of your plate with fruits and vegetables, and the other half is split between lean proteins and good carbs, like brown rice or quinoa. In addition, the program says to:
      • Reduce saturated fat to less than 7% of your daily total calories
      • Choose healthier fats, like from salmon, omega-3 fatty acids, nuts, avocados and olives
    • This will ensure that you feel better, no matter how old or how sick you may have felt before, in a more sustainable way.
  • Exercise – If you really want to reverse heart disease, you have to start working exercise into your daily routine. If you have never exercised, you can start with as little as 15 minutes a day and work your way up to 30 minutes a day. If you don’t have time to hit the gym each day, work 30 minutes into your daily routine. Walk your child to school, take the stairs at work, go for a 15-minute walk at lunch, or mow your lawn. These are all ways to get your heart rate up during your daily activities.
  • Relax – take time each day to totally unwind and de-stress. Turn off the computer, turn off the TV, put the kids to bed and totally relax. Stress is a big contributor to heart disease, the quicker you learn to manage your stress the quicker you will be able to reverse some of the symptoms of heart disease.

Heart Disease Screening

About Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Resources:

How the “Superwoman” Syndrome Impacts Heart Health

superwoman4Are you a woman who tries to do it all? Many women are busier than ever these days juggling their careers, families, children, household duties, social lives and other obligations. When we can’t do it all, many of us feel guilty that we are unable to achieve perfection and balance in our lives. At the times we are most stressed, many of us make unhealthy choices, such as leaving exercise out of our daily routine, eating unhealthy foods and not getting enough rest. Unfortunately, this “superwoman” syndrome can lead to higher blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, higher cholesterol, cancer and importantly, heart disease, which is the number one killer of women in this country.

Heart disease may be prevented and is potentially reversible in many cases, so it’s important to learn how to make the best choices for our future health.

1. Realize that it is ok to not be perfect all the time. You are not alone — ask any other woman, and most likely you will learn that she is experiencing some of the same struggles as you. When you can’t be perfect, learn to laugh through the chaos.

2. Learn stress-relieving techniques. Determine the avenue for stress relief that works best for you. For some people it is going out for a run or scheduling a girls’ night, while others may prefer some time alone. Determine which activities make you happiest and make sure to work some of these into your schedule.

3. Eat healthy foods. Food choices can dramatically impact the way you feel. Make sure to balance protein, carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, and good fats in each meal so that your body has the energy it needs to make it through the toughest days.

4. Rest. Make sure to get six to eight hours of rest each night. Although it may be hard to pack this much rest into the day with your hectic schedule, try to rest as much as possible so you are alert and more productive. When you are rested, you can accomplish more, and you feel better overall.

5. Exercise. Try to work exercise into your daily routine. Exercise has been proven to increase energy levels, lower stress and improve mood. If you don’t have time to go out for a morning run, walk up stairs, park at the back of the parking lot, do squats at your desk while on a teleconference or lift hand weights while you are waiting for your child to get ready for school.

All of the recommendations above do not have to be completed at once — at first, try taking small steps toward improving your health. If you have a high-stress lifestyle and think you may be at risk for heart disease, schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening at the Emory Women’s Heart Center. Emory Women’s Heart Center nurse practitioners may be able to help you craft a plan to help you reduce stress and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

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Farheen Shirazi, MDAbout Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Links

Quiz: Are You at Risk for Heart Disease?

Stress & Heart Disease Chat With Dr. Parashar

Keep Your Heart Healthy – Get Active!

Signs That You May Need a Cardiovascular Screening

Make a Healthy Nutrition New Year’s Resolution You Will Keep All Year Long!

How to Fall Asleep Faster!

Tips to Fall AsleepDo you have a hard time falling asleep? Women are busier than ever and as a result at the end of the day, many women have a hard time falling asleep. In an American Heart Association article, Emory Women’s Heart Center Clinical Director, Gina Lundberg, MD offers a few tips to help women get to sleep faster and stay asleep longer.

Here is a sneak peak at the some of her tips to help you fall asleep faster!

  • Exercise regularly
  • Avoid stimulants before bed
  • Establish a relaxation routine
  • Stay away from sleep medications

Takeaways from Dr. Murphy and Dr. Halkos’ Chat on Mitral Valve Disease

Mitral Valve Disease Q&AThank you for attending the live chat on mitral valve disease on Tuesday, February 25. We had a great discussion, so thank you to all who participated and asked questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here).

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Jean -What precautions need to be taken when diagnosed?

halkos-michael

Dr. Halkos: 

Jean – In general, patients with mitral valve disorders need to take special precautions against infection during certain procedures, such as dental cleaning.  It is important to let providers that take care of you know you have mitral valve disorders when seeing them so they can take the necessary precautions.

4 Heart Healthy Benefits of Almonds!

AlmondsThe evidence is overwhelming that almonds can help lower LDL-cholesterol and reduce your risk of heart disease. On top of that they are incredibly convenient, requiring no preparation. Why do these little nuts pack such a big punch? Read on to find out.

  1. Almonds are high in monounsaturated fats, but low in saturated fat (the bad kind). Monounsaturated fats are the same type of health-promoting fats as are found in olive oil, and they’ve been associated with reduced risk of heart disease.
  2. Almonds are packed with a whopping 247 milligrams of magnesium per cup. Magnesium is a natural calcium channel blocker, cleaning out veins and arteries and helping them relax, which lessens resistance and improves the flow of blood and oxygen throughout the body.
  3. Almonds are loaded with potassium. Potassium is an electrolyte with a critical job: helping your heart beat. Potassium helps trigger your heart’s squeeze of blood through your body, and helps to promote normal blood pressure.
  4. Almonds are high in Vitamin E. Two landmark studies followed a total of 125,000 men and women, concluding those who supplement with at least 100 IU of vitamin E daily reduced their risk of heart disease by 59 to 66%.1, 2

So next time you’re in the supermarket, grab some almonds and do something good for your heart!

References

1 Stampfer MJ, Hennekens CH, Manson JE, Colditz GA, Rosner B, Willett WC. Vitamin E consumption and the risk of coronary disease in women. N Engl J Med. 1993;328:1444-1449.
Rimm EB, Stampfer MJ,Ascherio A, Giovannucci E, Colditz GA, Willett WC. Vitamin E consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease in men. N Engl J Med. 1993;328:1450-1456.

Related Resources:

Takeaways from Dr. Cutchins’ Chat on Heart Disease in Women

Heart Disease PreventionThank you for attending the live chat on women and heart disease on Tuesday, February 11. We had a great discussion, so thank you all who posed questions. We were thrilled with the number of people who were able to register and participate in the chat. (You can check out the transcript here). We hope this means the word is spreading that heart disease is the number one killer of women and in many cases it is preventable if we take action.

The response was so great that we had a few questions we were not able to answer during the chat so we will answer them below for your reference.

Kim – Do you have advice for how we handle ER/EC encounters and successfully get the ER/EC doc/ staff to acknowledge active Heart Disease in the pre-menopausal woman?? With newer diagnoses such as coronary endothelial dysfunction/severe coronary vasospasms for me diastolic CHF due to the preceding perhaps advice on how to navigate our local healthcare systems when we cannot get to Emory. Are these disorders and often the testing that goes along with them that is often NORMAL, are they becoming more well-versed to the medical establishments or not?

Dr. Alexis Cutchins

Dr. Cutchins: 

Kim – This is a very good question but not so easy to answer. The Emory Women’s Heart Center is working hard on trying to educate physicians in our communities about heart disease in women. We are stressing to these physicians that heart disease can exist with negative ED test results. That said, when a woman presents to the ED with symptoms the physicians are doing their best to make sure there is nothing acute or life threatening going on with the patient. If all ED tests are normal and the patient is still concerned, the patient should follow up afterwards with a cardiologist who specializes in women with heart disease. All of the diseases you have described above are real and should be taken seriously. We have multiple treatment options for patients who fall into those categories. To find out more information you can visit emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart.

Tonia – Recently diagnosed with CHF- should I be concerned about my heart murmur?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins: 

Hi Tonia. Although I can’t speak to your condition without seeing you in person, I can tell you that in general, it’s not uncommon for patients with CHF (congestive heart failure) to have heart murmurs. Typically, I recommend patients speak to their physician and ask their physician(s) to perform an echo (heart ultrasound) if it has not been imaged already.

A heart murmur could be caused from any number of factors including:

  • Increased flow across a heart valve
  • Leaking of a heart valve
  • Tightening of a heart valve.

Stay in close connection with your cardiologist to evaluate your case. If you need a cardiologist who specializes in heart disease and women, you can choose an Emory Women’s Heart Center physician by calling 404-778-7777 or visiting emoryhealthcare.org/womensheart.

Flora – I have atrial fibrillation (AF) will I get better?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins:

Hi Flora. I can’t speak to your condition without seeing you in person, but for many people, atrial fibrillation can get better. Some people have atrial fibrillation that comes and goes and some are in AF all the time. Typically, depending on a patient’s symptoms while they are in AF there are a variety of treatment options available ranging from medications to surgical procedures. How an individual feels with the diagnosis can vary so it is important to visit your cardiologist and discuss your particular case in person.

Imelda – Is taking baby aspirin now is safe?

Dr. Alexis Cutchins

Dr. Cutchins:

Like most medication, taking baby aspirin can provide side effects and is risky in some populations of people. In some cases it can cause gastrointestinal bleeding. In certain populations, such as women over the age of 65, the benefit outweighs the risk. For women over 65 who are at risk for heart disease and have well controlled blood pressure, a baby aspirin is recommended to decrease the risk of stroke and heart attack. Also women of any age with diabetes or diagnosed coronary artery disease, who do not have a contraindication, typically should take a daily baby aspirin. We always recommend to patients that they consult with their physician prior to taking any new medication to make sure it does not interact with any other medication the patient may be taking.

Imelda – Is fish oil and vitamin E is good for the heart?

Dr. Alexis CutchinsDr. Cutchins:

Fish oil is useful for women with high cholesterol or triglyceride levels. The recommendation is to take 1800mg/day of “EPA” which should be found on the bottle. Also fatty fish such as salmon, is a great source of Omega-3 fatty acids that are protective. For more information on how fish oil can improve your heart & brain health please visit this blog on fish oil, posted last week on the Emory Advancing your Health Blog.

I am not as familiar with the benefits and risks associated with taking Vitamin E but it is not specifically recommended for women by the American Heart Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

About Dr. Cutchins
Alexis Cutchins, MD is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

Dr. Cutchins has published several different articles on adipose tissue distribution and obesity in journals such as Circulation Research, Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Stroke and has a special interest in the effects of adipose tissue distribution on the heart.

Dr. Cutchins is board certified in Internal Medicine (2007) and Cardiovascular Diseases (2012). She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.
Dr. Cutchins sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Saint Joseph’s.

She enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband, their three daughters and their dog. She loves to cook and ride horses.

Related Links

Top Symptoms of Heart Attacks in Women

Heart Attack WomenHeart Disease is the most common cause of death in men and women and can often strike without warning. Despite advances in treatment for heart disease, only a fraction of patients make it to the hospital in time for them to benefit from these therapies.

When treating heart disease, time is critical. Recognition of the symptoms of a heart attack is essential in obtaining potentially life-saving treatment. A heart attack can begin to damage the heart within minutes of the start of symptoms and sometimes this damage may be irreversible. With heart attacks, TIME = MUSCLE. So Call 911 as soon as symptoms appear!

Many individuals do not realize they are having a heart attack because the symptoms may be mild. They may attribute the symptoms to stress, muscle strain, indigestion, or the flu. It is important to recognize these atypical heart attack symptoms in women because not all heart attacks manifest with chest pain. This tends to be the case more so in women than for men.

What are the top symptoms of a heart attack in women?

  • Chest pain or discomfort: May feel like a squeezing, pressure, heaviness, tightness or fullness. The pain or pressure can be gradual or sudden. It may come and go, gradually intensify or awaken one from sleep.
  • Heaviness or pain in other areas including back, neck, jaw or arms. This is more common in women.
  • Cold sweat: This can occur even without chest discomfort. If there is no obvious reason for sweating such as during exercise or hot flashes, consider having your physician investigate this further.
  • Fatigue: Some women may experience feeling extremely tired even during routine tasks, a gradual or sudden decrease in energy level or an inability to complete tasks that they were able to in the past.
  • Nausea: This can be mistaken for other problems such as flu, heartburn or stomach ulcers; however, nausea can also be a presentation of heart disease or angina.
  • Shortness of breath: Can occur with minimal activity or with activities that previously did not cause difficulty breathing. This is especially important because people with diabetes may not necessarily have chest pain, and this may be their only symptom of a heart attack.
  • Lightheadedness: May occur with activity or in conjunction with any of the other symptoms.

In the case of a heart attack, no symptom should be taken lightly. If symptoms exist, act on them as soon as possible. Remember, TIME = MUSCLE. Call 911 even if you suspect you may be having a heart attack, but are not sure.

About Ijeoma Isiadinso, MD
Ijeoma Isiadinso, MDIjeoma Isiadinso, MD MPH is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed her undergraduate studies at Binghamton University in New York majoring in biology and sociology. She then pursued a joint degree in medicine and public health at MCP Hahnemann (Drexel University) School of Medicine. Dr. Isiadinso completed a residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Cardiology at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia. She served as Chief Fellow during her final year of her cardiology fellowship.

Her commitment to public health has led to her involvement in several projects focused on heart disease and diabetes. She has participated in research projects with the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and presented her work at national conferences. Her research interests include inequalities in health care, community and preventive health, lipid disorders, women and heart disease, and program development and evaluation.

Dr. Isiadinso has served as the health advisor to nonprofit organizations. She has participated in panel discussions at high schools, universities, and with the Black Entertainment Television Foundation.

Dr. Isiadinso is board certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases, Nuclear Cardiology, Echocardiography, and Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. She is a member of several professional organizations including the Association of Black Cardiologists, the American College of Cardiology, the American Society of Preventive Cardiology, and the American Public Health Association.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.
Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Related Resources

Fish Oil Can Improve Heart & Brain Health

Fish Oil Supplements Heart HealthPhysicians and nutritionists advocate that individuals should eat 2 – 3.5 ounce servings of fish high in omega – 3s each week to improve heart and brain health. When eating this amount is not possible, many experts recommend substituting fish oil supplements. In fact, Emory Women’s Heart Center clinical director Gina Lundberg, MD recommends fish oil supplements for all patients after 50 years old.

A study has recently shown that women over the age of 50 who consumed the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids maintain better brain function than those who consumed lower levels. While fish oils have not been proven in research to reduce heart attack and strokes, the benefits of consuming fish oil are great. Foods (and supplements) that contain omega – 3 fatty acids (such as fish and fish oil) can reduce an individuals risk of abnormal heart rhythms such as arrhythmia and can delay plaque growth rate in the arteries. Further, omega – 3s and/or fish oil can also help lower blood pressure. A generic over the counter fish oil supplements can provide a similar benefit to the more expensive omega – 3 prescription fish oils at a lower cost, say Dr. Lundberg. Read the entire article published in USA Today to learn more as well as determine which fish oil supplements may be the best for your heart and brain health.

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About Gina Lundberg, MD
Dr. Gina LundbergDr. Lundberg, Emory Women’s Center Clinical Director, is a Preventive Cardiologist with The Emory Clinic in East Cobb. Dr. Lundberg is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine.

She is a National AHA Spokesperson. Dr. Lundberg has been a Board Member of the American Heart Association for Atlanta from 2001 till 2007 and was on the Southeast Affiliate Board 2006-2007. She also served on the SEA Strategic Health Initiatives Committee to promote Go Red for Women. She has been involved in every program related to the Go Red for Women initiative for the metro Atlanta area since its development in 2003. Dr. Lundberg was the Honoree for North Fulton/ Gwinnett County Heart Ball for 2006. In 2009 she was awarded the Women with Heart Award at the Go Red Luncheon for outstanding dedication to the program. She is a Circle of Red founding member and Core Vitae member for AHA. She also serves on the ACCF Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee.
She has been interviewed on the subject of Heart Disease in Women on CNN and in USA Today. Governor Sonny Perdue appointed Dr. Lundberg to the Advisory Board for the Department of Women’s Health for the State of Georgia in 2007 till 2011. In 2005, Atlanta Woman Magazine awarded Dr. Lundberg the Top 10 Innovator Award for Medicine. In 2008 Atlanta Woman Magazine named her one of the Top 25 Professional Women to Watch and the only woman in the field of medicine. She has published articles in several medical journals and contributed to several text books.

She attended the Medical College of Georgia and trained in Internal Medicine at Atlanta Medical Center (Georgia Baptist). Her cardiology fellowship was at Rush University in Chicago. She has been in practice in Atlanta since 1994. She is Board Certified in Cardiology and Internal Medicine and recertified in both in 2002. Dr. Lundberg has two children and considers motherhood her first and foremost career. Dr. Lundberg has lived most of her life in the metro Atlanta area.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.
Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

Heart Disease is Not Just a “Man’s Disease”

Heart Disease PreventionHeart disease is often considered “a man’s disease” so you may be surprised to learn that over 8.6 million women worldwide die from heart disease each year. This accounts for over 1/3 of all deaths in women. In fact, heart disease kills 6 times more women each year compared to breast cancer.*

Interesting Facts on Heart Disease in Women Vs. Men:

  • Women often times wait longer than men to go to an emergency room for treatment while having a heart attack.
  • Physicians, not specifically trained in women and heart disease, some times have a harder time diagnosing heart attacks in women because of the differences in presentation of symptoms.
  • Women’s hearts respond better than men’s hearts to healthy changes in lifestyle.
  • Within a year after a heart attack, 38% of women will die, compared to 25% of men.
  • Women are more than 2 times more likely to die after bypass surgery then men.

Go Red for Your Heart In February

Go Red Events AtlantaHeart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States, but in many cases it’s preventable. That’s why Emory Healthcare would like to invite you to a women’s heart health event in February, either at our Emory University Hospital Midtown campus, or our Emory University Hospital campus.

During these fun, educational events, participants will have an opportunity to meet Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians and staff and learn about how to prevent, detect and treat heart disease. In addition, the events feature nutrition consultations, food and promotional vendors, as well as body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure screenings for attendees.

RSVP: 404-778-7777

Go Red Event Details

Date: Friday, February 14, 2014
Program: 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. — Heart Health event in the hospital’s atrium
12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. — How to Prevent, Detect and Treat Heart Disease in Women, a presentation delivered by Emory Women’s Heart Center physician Alexis Cutchins, MD

Location: Emory University Hospital Midtown
550 Peachtree Street, NE
Atlanta, GA 30308