heart conditions

What Is Atrial Fibrillation (A-Fib)?

Atrial FibrillationAtrial fibrillation is the most common irregular heart rhythm in the United States. According to the American Heart Association, about two million Americans suffer from atrial fibrillation. This irregular heart rhythm occurs when multiple circuits of disorganized electrical activity in the top chambers of the heart (the atria) replace the organized electrical activity that is normally generated by the heart. The result is “quivering” (or “fibrillation”) of the atria instead of regular heartbeats.

Although not directly life threatening, atrial fibrillation often produces a fast, irregular and ineffective heart rhythm that can cause a variety of symptoms, including chest pain, decreased blood pressure, weakness, lightheadedness and shortness of breath.

There are many conditions that can cause atrial fibrillation. The most common include:

  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • Coronary artery disease (CAD)
  • Heart valve disease
  • Heart surgery
  • Chronic lung disease
  • Heart failure
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Pulmonary embolism
  • Alcohol use

Recently, it has been discovered that high-level athletes competing in endurance sports are at higher risk of developing this condition. Of note, the risk of atrial fibrillation increases with age, particularly after age 60. However, in at least 10% of cases, atrial fibrillation occurs without any identifiable cause or risk factor. This is called “lone atrial fibrillation” and can be successfully treated in many cases.

Atrial fibrillation was once thought to be a harmless condition, but we now know that it can contribute to additional heart problems over time, including stroke and heart failure. Only a few years ago, people suffering from this common heart arrhythmia were told they would probably have to live with the problem. Today, however, an increasing number of people with atrial fibrillation can be treated and cured, thanks to innovative therapies and procedures such as cardiac ablation, available through the Emory Heart & Vascular Center’s Atrial Fibrillation Program.

With sites at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory’s Heart & Vascular Center has one of the few truly comprehensive atrial fibrillation treatment programs of its kind in the Southeast.

For more information about the Emory Atrial Fibrillation Program or to schedule an appointment, please call Emory HealthConnection℠ at 404-778-7777 or 1-800-75-EMORY.

About Dr. Lloyd

Michael Lloyd, MDMichael Lloyd, MD , began practicing medicine at Emory in 2007. He specializes in cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology. His areas of clinical interest and research include arrhythmias in athletes, arrhythmias in young adults with congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation and implantable devices for the treatment of heart failure. Dr. Lloyd is the program director for the Cardiac Electrophysiology Fellowship Program at Emory and holds organizational leadership positions with the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society.

About Emory’s Arrhythmia Center

Emory’s Arrhythmia Center is one of the most comprehensive and innovative clinics for heart rhythm disorders in the country. Our electrophysiologists have been pioneers in shaping treatment options for patients with arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, as well as for those with congestive heart disease. Our specialized electrophysiology (EP) labs host state-of-the-art equipment, including computerized three-dimensional mapping systems to assist with the ablation of complex arrhythmias, and an excimer laser system to perform pacemaker and defibrillator lead extractions.

Patients with devices, whether implanted at Emory or elsewhere, have access to Emory’s comprehensive follow-up care. Patients benefit from remote monitoring, quarterly atrial fibrillation support groups and 24-hour implantable cardiac device (ICD) and pacemaker monitoring services. Inpatient telemetry and coronary care units, as well as outpatient care and educational support of patients with pacemakers and ICDs, complete Emory’s comprehensive range of arrhythmia treatments and services.

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Congenital Heart Defect Repair in Childhood: Will I Need Another Surgery?

congenital heart repairNot too long ago, most babies born with serious heart defects died in childhood. Thanks to advances in cardiac care, some estimates indicate that today as many as 90% of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are able to live well into adulthood. In fact, there are now more adults than children living with CHD, and it has become increasingly clear that this growing population requires ongoing, specialized care. For instance, even if their defects are treated surgically in childhood, many patients will require additional surgery as adults to keep their hearts functioning correctly.

When many surgical procedures were first performed to correct congenital heart defects in children, the medical community generally assumed they were curative. But as the first generation of post-operative patients survived into adulthood, some began to develop late complications associated with the procedures they underwent as children.

Unfortunately, many of these late complications develop gradually and are associated with non-specific symptoms. In addition, CHD is so closely associated with infancy and childhood, that many patients assume they no longer need to worry about their condition once they have reached adulthood. Consequently, they may not make the connection between the symptoms they develop as adults and their CHD—especially if it was successfully corrected in childhood.

This relatively recent phenomenon bolsters the argument that patients with CHD—even if their defect was surgically corrected in childhood—need to continue regular follow-up with a congenital heart specialist into adulthood so that he or she can monitor for subtle changes that may indicate a serious problem.

Another issue with managing CHD in adulthood is that adult cardiologists may have difficulty treating conditions in hearts repaired—often effectively re-configured—by pediatric surgeons years earlier. Conversely, pediatric surgeons may be unfamiliar with the unique complications that can arise years later as “corrected” anatomy ages, and in general may not have the specific training and experience required to address congenital disease in adults.

In response to this growing crisis, Emory and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta have teamed up to help ensure that patients with CHD don’t get lost to follow-up as they transition into adulthood. The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia combines the expertise of Children’s Sibley Heart Center with that of Emory’s Adult Congenital Heart Center to address this crucial need. It is the first program of its kind in the South and one of the largest in the country.

About Dr. Kogon

Brian E. Kogon, MD , is chief of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery at Children’s Sibley Heart Center and Emory University Hospital , surgical director of the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program at Emory University Hospital and director of the Congenital Cardiac Surgery Fellowship at the Emory University School of Medicine.

Dr. Kogon received his medical degree from the University of Cincinnati and completed his residency in general surgery and a fellowship in cardiothoracic surgery at Indiana University. He then went on to complete his fellowship in pediatric cardiac surgery at Emory University, joining the staff in 2004.

Dr. Kogon is now a nationally recognized leader in pediatric and adult congenital heart disease. He has numerous publications in peer-reviewed journals and presents nationally at the major cardiothoracic surgery society meetings. He has earned various awards over the years, most recently the Teacher of the Year award for Pediatric Cardiac Surgery from the Sibley Cardiology Fellowship Program and Emory University.

Dr. Kogon’s major areas of interest include pediatric cardiac surgery, cardiac transplantation and adult congenital heart surgery.

About the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia

The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a collaboration between Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare. The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a comprehensive program for children and adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) that provides a continuum of lifesaving care from before birth through adulthood. The program is led by Emory Healthcare cardiologist Wendy Book, MD, Robert Campbell, MD, chief of cardiac services and director of cardiology at Children’s Sibley Heart Center, and Brian Kogon, MD, chief of Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery at Children’s Sibley Heart Center and Emory University Hospital and surgical director of the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Program at Emory University Hospital. To schedule an appointment please call 404-778-7777.

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Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects

CDH BabyBecause congenital defects can decrease the heart’s ability to pump blood and deliver oxygen throughout the body, they often produce telltale signs. Below are some of the more common symptoms that indicate a baby may have congenital heart disease (CHD).

  • Heart Murmur

A heart murmur is often the first sign of CHD. In basic terms, a murmur is just an extra heart sound, in addition to the regular sounds of a beating heart. Heart murmurs usually don’t indicate the presence of any heart problem. Sometimes a doctor can use a stethoscope alone to determine whether a particular murmur is a sign of heart disease. In other cases additional tests are necessary to determine the exact nature of a murmur.

  • Breathing Difficulties

Breathing difficulty caused by blood building up in the lungs (lung congestion) is a sign of a serious defect that will likely need medical or surgical intervention in the first year of life. Lung congestion may be the result of excessive blood flow from the left side of the heart to the right side through an abnormal connection, such as a hole in the heart or a connection between major blood vessels that allows blood to bypass the heart. Congestion can also be the result of an obstruction in blood flow on the left side of the heart that causes blood to back up in the vessels returning blood from the lungs.

  • Blue Skin

Some CHDs result in an inadequate amount of oxygen in the blood, which can cause the baby’s skin to have a bluish tint, especially in the lips, tongue, fingernails and toenails—called cyanosis. Cyanosis can result from an obstruction of blood flow to the lungs or a hole within the heart that allows oxygen-poor blood to flow from the right side to the left side and out to the body. It can also be related to other heart issues, including an abnormal positioning (transposition) of the arteries leaving the heart.

  • Failure to Thrive

Another result of inadequate oxygen in the blood is that an infant may lose weight or not gain enough, or may take longer to reach developmental milestones. These symptoms can result directly from the body not receiving enough oxygen to thrive, or they may be an indirect consequence of the infant tiring during feeding because of a lack of oxygen and, as a result, not receiving enough nutrients.

  • Excessive Sweating

Many CHDs can cause excess blood flow through the lungs, which makes breathing more difficult. The increase in exertion required to breathe can, in turn, result in excess sweating. Because feeding is a common form of activity in babies, this excess sweating is often closely associated with feeding, though any activity that causes an increase in the infant’s breathing rate can also cause increased sweat production. Excess blood flow to the lungs can also accelerate the infant’s metabolism, a side effect of which is increased sweating.

If you notice any of these signs in your baby or child, call your doctor right away. If your doctor notices these signs, you may be referred to a pediatric cardiologist.

About Dr. Rodriguez

Fred Rodriguez, MDFred Rodriguez, MD, is a pediatric cardiologist who practices pediatric cardiology at the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Sibley Heart Center and adult congenital heart disease at the Emory Clinic and Emory University Hospital. Dr. Rodriguez earned his medical degree from the Louisiana State University at New Orleans School of Medicine, where he also completed his combined residency in both internal medicine and pediatrics. Following his residency, he completed a cardiology fellowship at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, with additional training in adult congenital heart disease. He is board certified in pediatrics, pediatric cardiology and internal medicine.

About the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia

The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a collaboration between Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare. The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a comprehensive program for children and adults with congenital heart disease that provides a continuum of lifesaving care from before birth through adulthood. It is the first comprehensive congenital heart disease program in the South and one of the largest in the country. The program is led by Emory Healthcare cardiologist Wendy Book, MD, Robert Campbell, MD, chief of cardiac services and director of cardiology at Children’s Sibley Heart Center, and Brian Kogon, MD, chief of pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. To schedule an appointment, please call 404-778-7777.

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Congenital Heart Defects in Newborns

newbornCongenital heart defects (CHDs) are abnormalities present at birth that can affect the structure and function of the heart. Approximately 1% of infants born in the United States have CHDs. A baby’s heart begins to develop at conception, but is completely formed by eight weeks into the pregnancy. CHDs occur during this crucial first eight weeks of the baby’s development. Specific steps must take place in order for the heart to form correctly. Often, CHDs are a result of one of these crucial steps not happening at the right time, leaving a hole where a dividing wall should have formed or a single blood vessel where two ought to be, for example.

Some CHDs are known to be associated with genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome, but the cause of most CHDs is unknown. In these cases, doctors generally assume the cause is some mixture of environmental and inherited (genetic) factors.

Common types of congenital heart defects, which can affect any part of the heart or its surrounding structures, include:

While CHDs sometimes go undiagnosed for years — even into adulthood — others cause serious symptoms at birth, requiring the infant to be placed in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for immediate evaluation by a cardiologist.

Today there are more treatment options for CHDs than ever before, and most defects are treated successfully. If you suspect that your child has a heart defect, the sooner you get medical attention, the better chance your child will have of making the fullest recovery possible.

About Dr. Campbell

Robert Campbell, MD, is chief of cardiac services and director of cardiology at Children’s Sibley Heart Center. Dr. Campbell earned his medical degree from Emory University, where he also completed a residency in pediatrics. He completed a pediatric cardiology fellowship at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

About the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia

The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a collaboration between Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare. The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a comprehensive program for children and adults with congenital heart disease that provides a continuum of lifesaving care from before birth through adulthood. It is the first comprehensive congenital heart disease program in the South and one of the largest in the country. The program is led by Emory Healthcare cardiologist Wendy Book, MD, Robert Campbell, MD, chief of cardiac services and director of cardiology at Children’s Sibley Heart Center, and Brian Kogon, MD, chief of pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. To schedule an appointment, please call 404-778-7777.

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What Is Congenital Heart Disease?

Congenital Heart GraphicCongenital heart disease, or CHD, is a broad term that covers a range of conditions present at the time of birth that can affect the structure and function of the heart. CHD is the most common type of birth defect, but thanks to a number of advances in medical and surgical treatment, more and more children with CHD are surviving into adulthood. In fact, according to the Adult Congenital Heart Association (ACHA), there are about one million adults living with CHDs in the U.S.

Some of the most common conditions that cause congenital heart disease include:

As children with CHDs grow into adults, they need ongoing specialty cardiac care. Yet, this high-risk group often experiences lapses in cardiac care due to the perception that they are “fixed” or because they aren’t experiencing symptoms. Moreover, CHDs are so closely associated with infancy and childhood that people often think the conditions just don’t affect adults.

The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia was created to bridge the gap between pediatric and adult care for people with CHDs. If you were born with a CHD and haven’t been evaluated regularly by a cardiologist, you were recently diagnosed with a CHD or you have a child who will be transitioning into adult care in the near future, learn more about the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia and make an appointment today.

About Dr. Book

Wendy Book, MDWendy Book, MD , is the director of the Emory Adult Congenital Heart Center. She has 15 years of experience in adult congenital heart disease, including clinical and research experience. She has a background in heart failure, transplantation and pulmonary hypertension, which complement skills of other Emory Adult Congenital Heart Center physicians. She is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease, advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology.

About the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia

The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a collaboration between Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare. The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia is a comprehensive program for children and adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) that provides a continuum of lifesaving care from before birth through adulthood. It is the first comprehensive CHD program in the South and one of the largest in the country. The program is led by Emory Healthcare cardiologist Wendy Book, MD, along with Robert Campbell, MD, chief of cardiac services and director of cardiology at Children’s Sibley Heart Center. To schedule an appointment please call 404-778-7777.

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Treating Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

Congenital Heart DiseaseDid you know that congenital heart defects affect approximately 40,000 babies each year? And now, due to advances in medicine, many of these patients are living to adulthood and there are estimated to be more than 1 million adults in the United States with congenital heart defects, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

We strongly recommend that all adults born with a congenital heart defect should have routine follow – up care with a congenital heart specialist in order to ensure the heart is healthy. Conditions can develop later in life that a patient could benefit from additional treatment later. Luckily, not all congenital heart patients have to have surgical or medical treatments – some patients may just need routine monitoring.

Congenital Heart Disease Treatments

For those congenital heart patients who need more advanced treatments your physician will work with you to determine if your condition warrants medical treatment only or if you need more advanced surgical treatment.

Medical Management of Congenital Heart Disease

If a patient has an of the following conditions, preventive care and medical management of the congenital heart disease may be sufficient to keep the heart healthy:

If the congenital heart defect is more serious, surgical or interventional treatment may be required such as:

  • Heart Transplant
  • Pulmonary Valve Replacement
  • Valve Repair and Replacement
  • Septal Defects
  • Congenital Structural Heart Interventions

If you were born with a congenital heart defect it is important to find a physician who has specialized training in congenital heart disease. These physicians have specialized training and experience to deal with the complexities of congenital heart disease. Emory recently partnered with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta to form the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia that offers congenital heart care from birth until late life. Physicians at the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia have years of dedicated experience on patients with CHDs and will work with the team of physicians across CHOA and Emory to develop a treatment plan that best meets your needs.

About Dr. Sahu

Anurag Sahu, MDAnurag Sahu, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and is the Director of the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Emory University Hospital. He also specializes in cardiac MRI and cardiac CT imaging with specific training imaging of adults with congenital heart disease. He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Cardiovascular CT and Echocardiography. He has 4 years of adult congenital heart clinical and research experience.

About the Congenital Heart Center of Georgia

The Congenital Heart Center of Georgia, a collaboration between Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare, is one of the largest programs in the U.S.—and the only one in Georgia—specializing in the treatment of children and adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). The team, led by Wendy Book, M.D., Robert Campbell, M.D., and Brian Kogon, M.D., provides individuals with congenital heart disease appropriate lifelong care from before birth through adulthood. To schedule an appointment please call 404-778-7777. Find more information about this unique partnership by visiting congenitalheartgeorgia.org.

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Emory Adult Congenital Heart Center Treatments

How the “Superwoman” Syndrome Impacts Heart Health

superwoman4Are you a woman who tries to do it all? Many women are busier than ever these days juggling their careers, families, children, household duties, social lives and other obligations. When we can’t do it all, many of us feel guilty that we are unable to achieve perfection and balance in our lives. At the times we are most stressed, many of us make unhealthy choices, such as leaving exercise out of our daily routine, eating unhealthy foods and not getting enough rest. Unfortunately, this “superwoman” syndrome can lead to higher blood pressure, elevated blood sugar, higher cholesterol, cancer and importantly, heart disease, which is the number one killer of women in this country.

Heart disease may be prevented and is potentially reversible in many cases, so it’s important to learn how to make the best choices for our future health.

1. Realize that it is ok to not be perfect all the time. You are not alone — ask any other woman, and most likely you will learn that she is experiencing some of the same struggles as you. When you can’t be perfect, learn to laugh through the chaos.

2. Learn stress-relieving techniques. Determine the avenue for stress relief that works best for you. For some people it is going out for a run or scheduling a girls’ night, while others may prefer some time alone. Determine which activities make you happiest and make sure to work some of these into your schedule.

3. Eat healthy foods. Food choices can dramatically impact the way you feel. Make sure to balance protein, carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, and good fats in each meal so that your body has the energy it needs to make it through the toughest days.

4. Rest. Make sure to get six to eight hours of rest each night. Although it may be hard to pack this much rest into the day with your hectic schedule, try to rest as much as possible so you are alert and more productive. When you are rested, you can accomplish more, and you feel better overall.

5. Exercise. Try to work exercise into your daily routine. Exercise has been proven to increase energy levels, lower stress and improve mood. If you don’t have time to go out for a morning run, walk up stairs, park at the back of the parking lot, do squats at your desk while on a teleconference or lift hand weights while you are waiting for your child to get ready for school.

All of the recommendations above do not have to be completed at once — at first, try taking small steps toward improving your health. If you have a high-stress lifestyle and think you may be at risk for heart disease, schedule a comprehensive cardiovascular screening at the Emory Women’s Heart Center. Emory Women’s Heart Center nurse practitioners may be able to help you craft a plan to help you reduce stress and reduce your risk of developing heart disease.

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Farheen Shirazi, MDAbout Farheen Shirazi, MD

Farheen Shirazi, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine before completing her internship at New York University, her residency at Stanford University and her fellowship at Emory University. She is passionate about teaching patients how to reduce their risk for heart disease and stroke. Her practice encompasses the scope of general cardiology, with a focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and women’s health.

Dr. Shirazi has published in the area of preventive cardiology and is currently working on literature in the field of women’s cardiovascular health.

Dr. Shirazi is board certified in internal medicine and cardiology. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Heart Association, the American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Shirazi sees patients at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at East Cobb, as well as the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at 1365 Clifton Road.

She enjoys drawing, painting and reading classical literature in her spare time.

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center

The Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening for, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD, provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessments and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease, as well as a full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease. Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

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Simple Test Can Help Predict Future Risk for Heart Attacks

New research indicates that a blood test that is relatively simple can predict a patient’s risk of suffering a future heart attack. Physicians can determine what patients need more aggressive testing and treatment as well as those who are low – risk patients so they can avoid unnecessary tests. Before this research was completed it was not possible to differentiate a patient with heart disease who was at risk for a future heart attack versus a patient who was not likely to suffer future cardiac events. Therefore, cardiologists are now able to quickly treat the at risk patients and monitor those at lower risk.

Emory cardiologist Arshed Quyyumi, MD and Stephen E. Epstien, MD of MedStar Heart Institute are the senior authors of this research. During the research they studied over 3400 cardiology patients who had confirmed coronary artery disease or suspected disease. Each patient was followed for over 2 years.

Read the full news article and more about the new findings that were published in the Journal of American College of Cardiology.

About Arshed Quyyumi, MD

Dr. Quyyumi is a Professor, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Co-Director, Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (ECCRI)

Dr. Arshed A. Quyyumi has been involved in clinical translational research in cardiovascular diseases for over 25 years. Dr. Quyyumi received his undergraduate degree in Pharmacology and medical degree from the University of London, England. He completed his residency at Guy’s and Royal Free Hospitals in London, and cardiology fellowships at National Heart Hospital, London; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; and the National Institutes of Health. After completion of his residency and fellowship, he served in several capacities in the Cardiology Branch of National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, NIH in Bethesda, MD, including Senior Investigator and Director of the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. In 2001 he was appointed Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine, and in 2010 he was named Co-Director of the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute (ECCRI). Since 2005, Dr. Quyyumi has been awarded more than $9 million in research funding. He serves on the Editorial Boards of several national journals, is a member on several Scientific Advisory Boards, and is a reviewer for the NIH-NHLBI Study Sections. Dr. Quyyumi has authored more than 180 peer-reviewed publications and has been an invited speaker and session chair at numerous National and International scientific meetings and conferences.

Dr. Quyyumi’s research focus includes vascular biology, angiogenesis, progenitor cell biology, mechanisms of myocardial ischemia, and the role of genetic and environmental risks on vascular disease. Other interests have spanned the fields of personalized medicine and disparities in cardiovascular diseases. During his academic career, Dr. Quyyumi has carried out more than 50 NIH, industry-funded, or investigator-initiated projects, including numerous clinical trials.

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Welcoming New Medical Director of the Saint Joseph’s Hospital Heart Failure Clinic

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Dr. David Markham, MD, MSc

Emory Center for Heart Failure and Transplantation and Saint Joseph’s Hospital are pleased to welcome David Markham, MD, MSc, to the team as the medical director of the Heart Failure Clinic at Saint Joseph’s Hospital.

Markham is an experienced heart failure and transplant cardiologist and has performed groundbreaking work in the area of assist device physiology.

“I’m excited that Dr. Markham will be leading heart failure services and our partnership with Saint Joseph’s,” says Andrew Smith, MD, director of the Center for Heart Failure and Transplantation and chief of cardiology at Emory University Hospital. “He will continue the progress we’ve already made over the past few months with the Advanced Heart Failure Network and the consolidation of services for network patients at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Saint Joseph’s Hospital. These steps benefit our patients and enhance the services we offer.”

Markham received his undergraduate and medical degrees from Emory in 1991 and 1995, respectively and is a native of Marietta, GA. He completed an internship and residency at the University of Virginia, a post-doctoral fellowship in clinical and molecular cardiology at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and a fellowship in cardiology with advanced training in heart failure and cardiac transplantation at Duke University Medical Center.

Before his return to Emory, Markham was medical director of the Heart Failure Clinic at Parkland Memorial Hospital and associate director of heart failure, assist devices and cardiac transplantation at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

About the Emory and Saint Joseph’s Center for Advanced Heart Failure

The Advanced Heart Failure Network is an enhanced cardiac collaboration that includes expert care from subspecialists at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Saint Joseph’s Hospital of Atlanta. For over 20 years Emory Healthcare and Saint Joseph’s Hospital have had the largest advanced heart failure programs in Georgia. The new collaboration will focus on meeting the needs of patients and their families dealing with heart failure. Patients in need of advanced heart failure management, medical and surgical management of other heart conditions and related therapies, may now access treatment at any of the three facilities.

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Heart Disease is the Number One Killer of Women – Take Action Now to Avoid Being a Statistic!

Many people consider heart disease to be a predominantly male-oriented condition. However, heart disease is the number one killer in women and affects one out of every three in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. Heart disease occurs when fatty build-up in your coronary arteries, called plaque, prevents blood flow that’s needed to provide oxygen to your heart.  When the blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart muscle is severely reduced, or completely cut off, a heart attack occurs.

“The scary thing is that heart attacks in females are more likely to be fatal than in men,” explains Farheen Shirazi, Cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Johns Creek. “Far too often, women ignore the warning signs of a heart attack and do not seek immediate medical attention. As time elapses, the muscles of the heart weaken, causing severe or life-threatening damage.”

Thankfully the awareness about heart disease continues to be on the rise. “The most important weapon against heart disease is awareness. Women need to research their family history and take time to educate themselves on not only the risk factors and symptoms of heart disease, but preventive medicine as well.”

How can you educate yourself? Join Dr. Shirazi on Tuesday, April 9 for an online web chat on women and heart disease. She will be available to answer your questions such as: what women can do to prevent heart disease, the importance of getting treatment right away and the research underway to combat heart disease in women.


 About Dr. Farheen Shirazi

Farheen Shirazi, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and a cardiologist at the Emory Heart & Vascular Center.  She specializes in preventive cardiology and heart disease in women.  Dr. Shirazi completed medical school at Morehouse School of Medicine, her Internship at New York University School of Medicine, her residency at Stanford Hospital and her Fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine.  Dr. Shirazi has been practicing at Emory since 2012 and primarily sees patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Johns Creek Hospital and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Cumming She is passionate about educating women about how to prevent heart disease.

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