Arrhythmia/Atrial Fibrillation

Lone Atrial Fibrillation (A-Fib) – Takeaways from our Heart to Heart

Lone Atrial FibrillationThank you for those who were able to participate in the Emory Heart & Vascular Center Live Chat on Arrhythmias last week! You all had great questions and highly engaged. If you could not join me, you can view the Arrhythmia chat transcript here. We covered a lot of different topics. Please feel free to use the comments below to let us know if you have other heart and vascular topics you would like to cover in future live chats, and we will see if we can organize!

During the chat, there were questions I did not have time to answer. Specifically, I told attendees that I’d be posting a follow up blog on Lone Atrial Fibrillation, a less discussed type of arrhythmia that I got some good questions around.

What is Lone Atrial Fibrillation (A-Fib)?

Lone Atrial Fibrillation (A-Fib) is atrial fibrillation seen in patients younger than 60 years with no underlying structural heart disease.  It may be caused by a specific trigger or could occur without any trigger.

What are the possible triggers for Lone Atrial Fibrillation?

Lone A-Fib can be triggered by:

  • Emotional or work related stress
  • Physical Overexertion
  • Alcohol use or overuse
  • Caffeine consumption
  • Infection
  • Dehydration
  • Electrolyte imbalances
  • Drugs (cocaine, amphetamines, etc)
  • Hypoglycemia

Unfortunately, in the majority of cases of Lone Atrial Fibrillation occur without any triggers. It is probably difficult to avoid all the potential triggers for Lone A-Fib.  But when a trigger exists, it is  typically specific to each individual.  There is no consistent way to safely and effectively manage Lone A-Fib episodes, so I recommend you consult your cardiologist to ensure you are taking the most appropriate steps for your particular case.

You can visit our website to learn more about Emory’s Arrhythmia Program.

Dr. Mikhael El-ChamiAbout Mikhael El-Chami, MD
Dr. El-Chami completed his residency at Emory in 2003 and he was nominated for a chief residency year at Emory in 2004. His training in cardiology and electrophysiology also was completed at Emory. His areas of clinical interest include: cardiac arrhythmia ablation, cardiac resynchronization therapy and prevention of sudden cardiac death. Dr. El-Chami holds organizational leadership memberships with the American College of Cardiology and the Heart Rhythm Society. He speaks Arabic and French fluently.

Has Your Heart Ever Skipped a Beat?

Arrhythmia Web Chat with Dr. El-ChamiHave you ever experienced a skipped heart beat or a change in the regular beat of your heart? If so, you may have a rhythm disorder called an Arrhythmia. Arrhythmias are common in middle-aged adults. Some arrhythmias are relatively harmless, but others can be fatal if not treated. Nearly 1,000,000 people are hospitalized for an arrhythmia each year, and some arrhythmias, such as Atrial Fibrillation, are extremely common and affect over 2,500,000 million Americans.

Join me on Wednesday, August 24, at 12:30 p.m. for an interactive web chat on the topic of Diagnosing, Managing and Living with Arrhythmias. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about arrhythmias, including symptoms, diagnosis, prevention and treatment, as well as innovative new cardiovascular research on the horizon.

You can register online for the live chat! UPDATE CHAT TRANSCRIPT

Dr. El-Chami

About Mikhael El-Chami, MD

Dr. El-Chami completed his residency at Emory in 2003, and he was nominated for a chief residency year at Emory in 2004. His training in cardiology and electrophysiology also was completed at Emory. His areas of clinical interest include: cardiac arrhythmia ablation, cardiac resynchronization therapy and prevention of sudden cardiac death. Dr. El-Chami holds organizational leadership memberships with the American College of Cardiology and the Heart Rhythm Society. He speaks Arabic and French fluently.

Learn About Atrial Fibrillation (A–Fib) in new Physician “Ask the Expert” Video Series

Atrial Fibrillation Ask the ExpertsAs we have discussed in previous blogs on the topic of arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, also referred to as A – Fib, is the most common irregular heart rhythm in the United States.  It is so prevalent that over 2 million Americans suffer from it. Even though it is not directly life threatening, it can lead to other heart problems such as congestive heart failure and stroke, as well as shortness of breath, dizziness, chest discomfort and palpitations.

The physicians in Emory’s Arrhythmia Program talk about various arrhythmia topics and how to best manage your condition in our new “Ask the Expert” video series.

You can also view past blogs about arrhythmia including:

If you have further questions or think you may have A- Fib after viewing our atrial fibrillation videos, please call Emory HealthConnection℠ 404-778-7777 to speak with a nurse.

Do you have questions about this procedure or about A-Fib in general? If so, please let me know in the comments section.

About Angel Leon, MD:

Dr. Leon is a Professor of Medicine and the Chief of Cardiology at Emory University Midtown. His specialties include electrophysiology, cardiology, and internal medicine, and his areas of clinical interest include arrhythmia ablation, electrophysiology lab, and pacemaker. Dr. Leon holds organizational leadership memberships with the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. He has been practicing with Emory since 1991.