Heart Disease is Not Just a “Man’s Disease”

Heart Disease PreventionHeart disease is often considered “a man’s disease” so you may be surprised to learn that over 8.6 million women worldwide die from heart disease each year. This accounts for over 1/3 of all deaths in women. In fact, heart disease kills 6 times more women each year compared to breast cancer.*

Interesting Facts on Heart Disease in Women Vs. Men:

  • Women often times wait longer than men to go to an emergency room for treatment while having a heart attack.
  • Physicians, not specifically trained in women and heart disease, some times have a harder time diagnosing heart attacks in women because of the differences in presentation of symptoms.
  • Women’s hearts respond better than men’s hearts to healthy changes in lifestyle.
  • Within a year after a heart attack, 38% of women will die, compared to 25% of men.
  • Women are more than 2 times more likely to die after bypass surgery then men.

Join Dr. Cutchins for an Online Chat on Heart Disease in Women!

Women's Heart Disease Prevention Chat

Heart disease may be prevented so it is critical that women of all ages take control of their heart health and learn how to protect themselves from this deadly disease. If you think you are at risk for heart disease, want to learn how to prevent heart disease, or you have been diagnosed with heart disease but want to speak with a female cardiologist specifically trained to treat women with heart disease, join us for an interactive web chat on the topic of Women and Heart Disease. I will be available to answer questions and discuss various topics about women and heart disease including how symptoms are different in women than men, diagnosing heart disease, preventing heart disease, treatment of heart disease and research on the horizon.

Chat date: Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Chat time: 12:00pm
Host: Alexis Cutchins, MD, Emory Women’s Heart Center cardiologist

Women's Heart Disease Chat
*Statistics adapted from the Women’s Heart Foundation

About Alexis Cutchins, MD
Alexis Cutchins, MD is Assistant Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Cutchins completed medical school at Emory University School of Medicine before going to New York Presbyterian Hospital for her Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine. She completed an NIH-supported research fellowship in vascular biology and a clinical fellowship in cardiovascular diseases at the University of Virginia in 2012. She has a special interest in heart disease in women in addition to heart disease prevention and risk reduction in cardiology patients.

Dr. Cutchins has published several different articles on adipose tissue distribution and obesity in journals such as Circulation Research, Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and Stroke and has a special interest in the effects of adipose tissue distribution on the heart.

Dr. Cutchins is board certified in Internal Medicine (2007) and Cardiovascular Diseases boards (2012). She is a member of several professional organizations including the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology.

Dr. Cutchins will see patients at Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory University Hospital Midtown and Emory Heart & Vascular Center at Emory Saint Joseph’s.

She enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband, their three daughters and their dog. She loves to cook and ride horses

About the Emory Women’s Heart Center
Emory Women’s Heart Center is a unique program dedicated to screening, preventing and treating heart disease in women. The Center, led by nationally renowned cardiologist Gina Lundberg, MD provides comprehensive cardiac risk assessment and screenings for patients at risk for heart disease as well as full range of treatment options for women already diagnosed with heart disease care.
Find out if you are at risk for heart disease by scheduling your comprehensive cardiac screening. Call 404-778-7777.

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  • Debbie A.

    I have problems with angina pain. Nothing seems to be working. What can I do?

    • Emory Women’s Heart Center

      Debbie,

      Unfortunately, we are not able to speak to your condition without seeing you in person, but general angina pain should be evaluated by a physician. We encourage you to schedule an appointment with one of our Emory Women’s Heart Center physicians as soon as possible. You can call 404-778-7777 to find the physician closest to you.

  • Maryam Elahi

    hi, since last 3 weeks i am suffering from severe dizziness and pain in centr of chest, i took serc and depex tablet last week, and now dizziness problem is solved, now only a mild chest pain left, is there any problm with my heart??
    i am 22 years old girl

    • Emory Healthcare

      Hi Maryam,

      We’re sorry to hear you aren’t feeling well. Unfortunately, we cannot offer a diagnosis or treatment plan via this forum, but our HealthConnection nurses would be happy to help you choose a physician to make an appointment with. You may reach them by calling 404-778-7777 between 7:30am – 6:00pm M-F.

      If you feel you need immediate help, please call 911.

  • Maryam Elahi

    i have digestion problem too from 5 to 6 months, frequent stools and urination,
    plz tell me what is main issue

    • Emory Healthcare

      Maryam,

      As we said earlier, we’re very sorry to hear you aren’t feeling well. Unfortunately, we cannot offer a diagnosis or treatment plan via this forum, but our HealthConnection nurses would be happy to help you choose a physician to make an appointment with. You may reach them by calling 404-778-7777 between 7:30am – 6:00pm M-F.

      We do always advise that if you feel you need immediate help, please call 911.