Emory Explores New Treatment Option to Reduce High Blood Pressure

heart-stethoscopeAbout, 10-20 percent of high blood pressure, or hypertension, patients cannot control their symptoms with medication. A new experimental procedure, The SYMPLICITY HTN-3 Blood Pressure trail, is being conducted to help these patients drop their blood pressure an average of 30 points.

Dr. Chandan Devireddy recently reported to Fox 5 Atlanta that approximately 40 percent of people with treatment-resistant hypertension experience surges of adrenaline, signaling the kidneys to ramp up blood pressure. For these patients—who can’t control their blood pressure no matter how many medications they’re taking—Dr. Devireddy and his team are exploring a new treatment option. Because Dr. Devireddy has identified the kidneys as a potential source of the problem in treatment-resistant hypertension patients, the study will evaluate how hypertension among these patients is affected by delivering radio frequency energy to the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys. The goal of the procedure is to diminish or cease the excess adrenaline being delivered to the kidneys, thereby reducing blood pressure.

The study’s procedure, which will be conducted at Emory University Hospital Midtown, is recruiting 20 volunteers. Candidates for the study are those with long-term high blood pressure that hasn’t responded to treatment from at least three medications.

“The SYMPLICITY HTN-3 Blood Pressure study is double-blinded, so half of the volunteers will get the investigational procedure; half will get a so-called “sham” procedure. Researchers and participants won’t know who got what until it’s over,” says Dr. Devireddy.

Read more about the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 Blood Pressure trial being conducted at Emory University Hospital Midtown.

 

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